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Q&A 29: Galilean Sights and American AKs

Q&A 29: Galilean Sights and American AKs
hi guys thanks for tuning in to another QA on forgotten weapons comm I'm Ian McCallum and as usual I have several pages of questions here all of them provided by you guys the awesome patrons who make it possible for me to do forgotten weapons here everyday we'll just jump right into it let's see Eric with a somewhat polish sounding last name says I just got my C on our license I would love my first purchase to be a Polish gun what would you recommend for someone starting to collect for the first time if you can't recommend Polish gun then what would you recommend well there are a number of Polish options out there that are pretty cool and interesting which one you go with really depends on kind of what your interests are and what your budget is so one of the ones that came to mind is the temple which is really the Polish take on the AKM in five for five and it's a really cool gun but it's not a CNR eligible gun at this point so kind of leave that one off the table as for CNR the three that come to my mind would be if you're on a significant budget that there are a couple of Polish compact or subcompact pistols out there the p83 one on our Vinod is the one that really comes to mind and those are only one two to three hundred bucks probably now they're interesting in a historical sense because they came out of Poland Cold War there the story guns that until fairly recently were completely unacceptable and generally not very well known and now...
q a 29 galilean sights and american aks
because a whole big batch of them showed up now they're on the surplus market for just a couple hundred bucks and everyone looks at them in Kyoto as well they're kind of junky because they're cheap and we often combine cheap must mean poor quality we're going to touch on that in some later questions too so that's an option out there to me they're not the most interesting guns but if you're interested more in pistols than rifles then that's something to definitely consider if you have a bit of a larger budget and your interest in pistols definitely the thing I would suggest looking at is the these what we call in this country the raid on WC 35 vis and that is a 9-millimeter kind of a polish take on the 19 eleven sort of with some differences with the decocking lever they were manufactured in Poland before World War two and then the German occupation government continued their production and there are a couple different varieties of them at that really high end you've got pre-war polish marked ones which in there when they originally came out of the factory or just absolutely beautiful gardens extremely well made great finish cool polish crest on them and then as as that transitions to German manufacturer and then turns into kind of last-ditch manufacture by the end of the war the guns become mechanically simpler the finish gets really crude and that's I think for someone who's interested specifically in Polish guns that's a...
q a 29 galilean sights and american aks
really excellent area to take a look at there is a book out there specifically on the VIS raid on the radome is the name of the factory but everyone in the US tends to call the pistol the raid on so be aware of that going in anyway there is a book out there on them I haven't reviewed it but I do have a copy and if you decide to get into that field that book would be a really good resource to have my third option for you would be mousers there are a number of Polish basically Polish made thousand ninety-eight out there that are also kind of the same thing they were made before the war they were also used by the Germans so you've got a couple of different options to look at however mechanically they are Mauser 98 and there's not a whole lot to separate them besides a few markings and you know a few very specific features that sling configurations that barrel lengths the sight configurations that sort of thing so to my mind the most interesting readily accessible polish CNR firearm would probably be this pistol will says your recent Hotchkiss revolving cannon reminded me of when you did a video on a reproduction that used 50 BMG brass black-powder hand loads you said it was because the action wasn't up to smokeless full 50 BMG is this true or is this due to the manufacturing of the reproduction or is the design inherently not up to it this is a question I've been asked a couple times especially when that video came out years ago and what I have learned since...
q a 29 galilean sights and american aks
is that the reason that it was specifically marked for black powder only was actually one of liability that the manufacturer didn't want to take on any liability from people overloading 50 BMG Heon and you know if you do that if you overpressure and blow up a 50 BMG you're causing a really potentially destructive situation and so what they did was they specified black powder only because there's no way you could cram enough black powder into a 50 BMG case to cause any harm to that gun whether the action is actually up to it or not with full power regular factory 50 BMG I have no idea and to be honest I don't want to really make a statement about it one way or another for the exact same reason I don't want to be the guy who says yes it was just a marketing liability thing so go ahead and have fun and then the next person who does it blows the gun up I have no idea if you have a 50 BMG hodgekiss revolving cannon reproduction I would do some more research and try and talk to the original manufacturers and find out what the real deal is we'll also has a bonus question thar ha or floor and the answer is I like them both I had to pick one go with floor in fact I've only ever bought one like and shirt and it was one of my favorite albums of all time Brandon says any good recommendations on finding primary sources for research if you want primary sources you're gonna have to look the archives maybe not have to but you're definitely your best bet...
will be looking to archives so in the United States the US National Archives have an incredible amount of stuff now one of the problems and I should say most other national archives do as well although I'm not nearly as familiar with accessing them one problem with primary source research in the archives is you can't do it online and you can't really do it very quickly you have to go there and become acquainted with What's in all the boxes and it will inevitably involve digging through a lot of random material that you're not interested in and miscellaneous memos that you have to you will often probably have to read in some depth and you know put together you know trace communications you can't just you won't necessarily look at one document and be like oh this explains the answer to my question often it's going to be this guy talked to that guy and the back to this guy ended over to this other guy and once you figure out what the conversation was over this series of of communications or letters then you'll find the answer to some question or you may find that there you know there were issues that were resolved that you don't find out about in any other sort of secondhand referencing but it is the best way to find the most in-depth information but it's also the most time-consuming and the most difficult so brandman I suspect may be looking for Portuguese primary sources and I have no idea where to point you there except for find the...
the factory in Portugal find out if it's still around maybe they have archived still if not maybe the government does maybe the military does you may have trouble getting into a military archive in a country that you are not a citizen of maybe maybe not but that's right start Rob says do you think media like films and games are having a positive effect on the gun world ie bringing things into the open or negative ie stereotyping things it's always both I think in in media you're always going to have misconceptions and and miss things are gonna be presented in ways that aren't realistic and are sometimes counterproductive to you know education and understanding the truth about things but that sort of it when you put a subject in the continent entertainment context you're going to interest people in that subject you're gonna find people who go oh I just watched John wick and guns are cool and I want to learn more about them and all of the nonsense stuff that is in John wick which actually has a little bit less of it than most but it's still you know just it is an action movie out there if someone sees that decides to get into guns they will then learn the things that are in fact not factually accurate from Hollywood or from games and and I think overall it is probably better to get people interested by showing them things that maybe aren't entirely accurate and trust that as that that their interest will lead them to learn more and deeper and...
understand things better John asks what's the story with the Amazon Prime Forgotten weapons content I never really had a maybe I should have announced this more formally but basically Gold Harbor Media is a guy who I got in touch with he started talking he does a lot of other content on Amazon Prime especially like really really lucky sci-fi horror or exploitation sort of movies but has he had a ton of experience in packaging material for Amazon and going through Amazon's process for getting material approved for Amazon Prime and he thought compilations of forgotten weapons material would be a perfect fit for it and I think it also is and so we have a collaborative thing going where he packages things together in a subject and put them up on Amazon and they are up there for you guys to watch some through there a couple I think that are pay to watch but virtually all of them are free for Amazon Prime Christopher says what future books are in the works from headstamp publishing I think I remember talks about British sniper rifle book next but I'm really curious as to what might follow we have two books specifically in the works right now to follow up on mine ShotSpotter from Oz the first one of those is a book not on British sniper rifles but on British bullpup rifles and that will cover everything from the thornycroft circa 1900 all the way through the the current saat series so there were a bunch of experimental and quasi the the mid you know just after world war...
ii the m1 m2 those sorts of guns and then development of the l85 and l86 that's going to be an awesome book that's actually being written by Jonathan Ferguson who is curator of the National Firearms Center so he's got all those guns are right at his disposal to work with and access to the British archives to do research in and that's gonna be an awesome book after that we also have a book coming up on a very niche subject but one that I think is gonna be really interesting and it is the history of the Kabul Arsenal in Kabul Afghanistan I think a lot of people expect that all the guns that came out of Afghanistan were just you know hand built in little huts in reality there was a modern very real manufacturing arsenal in Kabul around the turn of the century and they put out guns that are well built true you know factory manufactured firearms largely martini-henry sand variants thereof but we have a book on that subject that is also in the works and absolutely coming a bunch of the writings done on that a bunch of the photography is done it's it's in the process so after that we have a couple more things that we're working on lining up with authors some you've heard of some you haven't I don't want to talk about those until I know that they're done deals but we've we've got a substantial pipeline of cool material in the works Alexander Goethe says an interesting trend an interesting modern trend is curbing conversion kits for...
pistols are there any interesting historical versions of this how old is the concept really so I think he's talking about primarily things like the roni where you have a carbine chassis and you can drop a glock frame into it and presto your pistol has become a carbine those actually present some interesting subtle legal issues in the US with the short railed rifle considerations and the legal technicalities of converting a pistol to a rifle and a rifle to a pistol I don't want to get into those today because that's a really nitpicky sort of subject there we have a pretty long history basically as long as there have been handguns there have been stocks to put on handguns the thing that doesn't often happen is is ad is like extending the barrel length sometimes this could be done for example there are some of the star pistols from the mid 20th century where they would have a an extended magazine and a buttstock you could snap on to the back of the grip and then also something like a 16-inch barrel that you could swap out and and put into the gun there were let's see the French unique company made the model le and I believe the 60s and that is exactly this sort of thing it is a carbine upper this was a 22 rim firing it was a little low compact subcompact 22 caliber pistol and then a basically a 22 caliber plinking rifle upper and just like the Roni you would pull the slide off of the pistol and then you could fit the grip frame up into a rifle chassis where...
it made it up with its own old and barrel and the whole opera assembly the guns so those were around they were never all that popular they're still out there and people are interested in them see what else the dart neck not exactly a particularly successful gun but it also had a system like that where you could drop a dart Acree vulvar frame into a carbine barrel conversion upper I think the giro jet did I'm not a hundred percent on that the biggest problem you typically run into is you can't really extend a barrel so if you're gonna do a carbine conversion like that you have to have to complete barrels the gyro jet actually is a little bit of an exception to this possibly because it was smoothbore and not rifled and wasn't building up pressure anything so building an extended like having a barrel extension on a gyro jet would be easier than any of these others I think the fundamental problem with them is you don't if you're gonna when you've designed the gun you're either gonna design it to be a good pistol or a good carbine and the two aren't completely interchangeable you will get things like the grip and the trigger are not nearly as good or they aren't the right form in a carbine if they're designed as a pistol and typically I think people are more interested in buying the one gun that they are particularly looking to have than in buying one that can be so so at two different roles it always sounds good on paper but when...
the money actually comes down to it I think people tend to look at it and go you know what for just instead of paying you know let's say $100 for the pistol and then $50 for the conversion kit if I spend a hundred for the pistol I can spend another hundred and get a standalone rifle and I can have them both at the same time and they're both best at being the pistol or the rifle and I'm willing to spend that much extra money rather than having rather than spending a hundred and fifty dollars on this middle-ground thing where it can only be one at a time and and whatever the secondary thing is it's not not quite right nick says if you were in the trenches of World War one what would your loadout be and why my first choice would be an MP 18 if I were gonna if I had to be in World War one that's what I would want because I think that is a long longer range you're shooting is more opportunistic and not in you know immediate self-defense when when you are in immediate need in World War one of shooting someone instead of say taking cover and trying to move either forward or back without getting shot when you immediately need to shoot someone it's gonna be in close proximity and I would far I would be far more happy with a submachine gun than a bolt-action rifle or a handgun and the one submachine gun that was really in use during World War one was the MP 18 and even if we consider the Italian ones which were it presumably I think they were in some use...
I'd rather have the MP 18 I think it was probably the better of the two guns if I couldn't have that my second choice I think would be an RSC 1917 because that is the only semi-automatic rifle that was actually in service we won't talk about weird experimental things that's a different story but for guns that were actually issued a semi-automatic rifle is a fundamental advantage over a bolt-action rifle and that would be my backup choice behind a submachine gun Stephen says could you talk a little bit about the cartridges used on black-powder guns like the gras and the crow pot check were they similar to what we use today or or what would have been used in previous wars like the Civil War that's an easy one those black powder cartridges in this case with those two guns the 11 millimeter Gras cartridge but this is exactly in the same time period same same type of cartridge as the 4570 as the 11 millimeter Mauser there were a whole bunch of these cartridges 11 millimeter Mon liquor and they are fundamentally exactly like cartridges we have today except the powder inside was black powder instead of smokeless powder they're typically rimmed cartridges which is less common today but not fundamentally any different it's a brass cartridge case it's a bullet in the front powder in the middle centerfire primer in the base the bullets typically around that time period are not going to be jacketed they're going to be just solid lead and they would...
often have a a paper wrap around the base of the bullet but really that that paper is the only difference between one of those cartridges at a totally modern cartridge got that instead of a copper jacket on the bullet so yeah very easy they're they're very much like modern cartridges in fact to the point that you can still use them in some of like 4570 is still used as a modern cartridge as long as the firearm that you're using it in is capable of withstanding smokeless powder you can load 4570 with smokeless powder and a modern jacketed bullet and it works just as well as it did as a black-powder round all right following up on that Ryan says I really don't honestly understand what advantage the Crowe panchak offered over to Grodd to justify its adoption so soon after the franco-prussian war the wort was lost because Bismarck beat the pants off Louie Napoleon diplomatically and strategic gaffes made by the French High Command so why focus on the one factor that performed rather well instead of things like modernizing the artillery core brass cases are the better technology but paired with black powder it seems like an incremental improvement rather than a game-changer so first off I think you'd fit in really well with the French High Command because that was their decision at the time the French army did not adopt the core pot check it was only adopted by the French Navy in relatively small numbers that was in 1878 the French army didn't actually...
start adopting something like that until 1884 and even then it was relatively slow the benefit I would I would say to a repeating rifle over a single-shot rifle is kind of analogous to a rifle that is typically going to be used in semi-auto but has a full auto selector switch so we know that you're you know a full auto a select-fire rifle is generally used in semi with auto reserve for specific exceptional situations and what the crappin check allowed was the same sort of thing where yes as long as you're firing in volleys under command of an officer in a well controlled situation it's not a big deal to single load cartridges however if things get really hairy the ability to have that magazine there is kind of like being able to flip the auto when you need it for an emergency so you can engage the magazine and make seven or eight shots in rapid succession before you have to reload and that could be the thing that gives a unit especially a small unit that's being outnumbered which by the way the Navy with Shore parties and marine type detachments that's a situation they're gonna be in potentially a lot more often than the Army that magazine gives them potentially the opportunity to have a you know a one-off burst of much greater firepower and I think there's absolutely value in having that it is also however important to recognize that if you're gonna fire a hundred rounds a single-shot rifles probably going to do it just in the it's not...
gonna do it any slower than say a tube Kapaa check because with a tube fed gun you're gonna fire your eight rounds much faster than the single shot gun or at least faster than a single shot gun but then you've got to reload eight rounds and the way it typically kind of tends to play out is that it's the same amount of time to take a cartridge from your belt and put it into the gun no matter what the system is whether it as long as you're single as long as you're doing it one round at a time stripper clips can make a fundamental change in this equation but if you have a tube magazine the difference between having a single shot gras and pull cartridge out put it in the thing close it fire it to grab your next cartridge the difference between that doing that say eight times and doing first eight repetitions of take a cartridge out and load it into the gun and then eight repetitions of fire work the bolt fire work the bolt those things come out at basically the same overall complete time so what you're saying is valid but in some in a lot of situations there is not an advantage to the to a tube-fed repeating rifle however there are those situations where you want to be able to delay that reloading time even though it you're you're making more reloading time but you're delaying it well those seven or eight rounds may be exactly what you need to get out of a bad situation next up is Keith who says I just saw your video about the Swiss lucre when...
I saw an online gun auction for in inter arms imported Luger this Luger immediately jumped out of me because it shares the straight front grip strap of the Swiss Luger so my question is what if any is the link between the two there is a very distinct link between the two so the inter arms imported Luger that you saw was manufactured by the Mauser company after World War Two and it was done specifically on a contract for interrupts basically inter Arms in the United States looked at the market and said wow there's a lot of people who want Lugar's and I bet we could make money if we could buy a batch of brand-new Lugar's from some manufacturer and sell them here in the United States so they went and approached Mauser seems like an appropriate company to talk to and Mauser thought this was a good idea Mauser needed some work this would been a nice lucrative contract for them but Mauser didn't have any the tooling to build Leuchars it had all been destroyed so what they ended up doing was they got it they went over to Switzerland talked to burn the boffin fabric burn burned still had all of its tooling for Leuchars and was willing to sell it to mauser so Mauser bought Swiss Luger tooling to make the metal occurs for inter arms and they just left them in the original Swiss configuration which is why they have that Swiss simplified straight front grip strap now it's interesting to point out this was a really difficult thing and it cost I think ultimately a cost...
Mauser a substantial amount of to do this it was not profitable for them for untrue reasons like it turned out all of the Swiss tooling was pretty much worn out you know they've been using it for a couple decades the things like the measurement gauges all had to be rebuilt and that was a huge expense that Mauser hadn't been anticipating and then there were also like how's this for an unexpected and you know like not catastrophic but huge substantial problem it was I think it was the probably to get this backwards but the the Swiss plans were designed around machine tools that held only was that Swiss tools held the tool head in one place so think like you're holding a drill and then you take the part and you move the part around to make all the cuts where the Mouser tooling was all based on holding the part in one place and moving the tool head around to make cuts so all of the technical drawings were basically unusable for mousers machine tools and they had to completely redo all of the technical drawings so there's a whole story to that in fact there's a book out there called the Parabellum is back that describes basically everything about every development of the Luger post-1945 and covers that situation in some depth so if you're interested in it that's an interesting book to to check out gas air spark I should we have a number of questions here now about my book of course I didn't mention at the beginning but we are still we are in...
fact know coming right up on the end of the Kickstarter pre-launch for my book Shaw Spota Tomas French military rifles 1866 to 2016 it is hopefully going to be the best collectors guide to these guns out there I'm really excited about it the Kickstarter has absolutely blown the doors off way beyond my expectations however you still have an opportunity to get in on it now and just because it's done fantastically well doesn't mean there's any reason not to still participate as it is right now if you're in on the Kickstarter you get $10 discount on the book compared to the retail version $20 discount actually on a signature edition if that's what you're looking for and we have a whole whole slew of features that we were able to add to the book as a result of blowing away stretch goals most of those will be in the retail book but not quite all of them so I'll have a link in the description to that Kickstarter and now let's talk about a couple of questions related to it gas air spark says what do I have planned meadow that the book is pretty much finished well it's not quite finished there's a fair amount of work still to do so we are currently in the editing and layout stage which means there is a lot of like really nitpicky checking and tweaking and arranging the layout on what is going to be probably a four to five hundred page book is not trivial making sure that all the pictures are just right and focus on on the elements that I...
want each picture to show make sure all the picture captions are good and everything flows nicely and then we've got the actual printing process we're going to be delivering books expectation is I believe November if we can get it done earlier we absolutely will but that's what we're planning on right now and there's gonna be a lot that goes into that so among those things like at this point something like three thousand signed copies of the book which is that steps are really huge endeavor I'm gonna be hand signing thousands of books I am in fact probably going to be flying to the publishing factory and and doing that by hand they're like they're gonna print the page sections that will be like the title pages and I will sign those and then they'll be bound into the books rather than try and deal with you know pallets literal pallets upon pallets of books open up all the boxes open the book sign the book close the book we're gonna simplify that bit by signing pages before they get bound but there's still a lot going into it so that's my first half is like it's yes it's almost done but there's still a lot of work ahead on it what do I have planned next definitely this as painful as the process is at the end it is painful for an author to go through the editing process and have professional people tell you how all your work sucks and needs to be fixed but despite all of that and my poor wrist signing thousands of books...
I'm excited to do another one I have a couple of subjects in mind but again I don't really want to go into detail on those until I'm sure about exactly what I'm gonna be working on because there's always the chance that that I could get started and decide that this just isn't a project that's gonna work well and I don't want to get people's hopes or expectations up before that I will be taking a little bit of a break from book writing in between the two though just to let myself recuperate a little bit Thomas says I know this is too soon but after your book shot Spota from us will you consider writing a book life a show too mAb p15 no probably not that one it is something that I did think about when I was doing this book however part of the reason that I'm it the subject that I did is that there was basically nothing out there on the topic written in English and I wanted to cover it there are a couple of good books out there on French handguns I think they're you know the books could be made a little better I think there's a little more information that could go into them they could be all color with really nice photography like we're gonna be doing for everything in headstamp but fundamentally the information is already out there and I would like to focus on things where there isn't a good resource yet jason says with all those signed versions being sold on Kickstarter is your wrists ready for all that writing no no it...
is not I'm kind of dreading that a honey says do you think your recent success with your book launched on Kickstarter is an indication of the direction of book publishing is headed ie high-end small-batch boutique ebooks for a targeted market or is print ultimately doomed I think print is is definitely not doomed if I did think print was doomed I would not have gotten into partnering up to form a publishing company however I think some of print is doomed I think the kind of read it once and dispose of it print is toast I think magazines are not long for this world and newspapers have even less time for them I think that stuff is readily and easily replaced by online media and online media offers a lot of advantages over those matze however when it comes to reference material when it comes to books that you're going to take down off the shelf and use repeatedly over and over and over not as opposed to books that you're gonna read once paperback novels maybe some problems there I don't know that I'd really be wanting to get into paperback novel publishing these days but good quality reference books I think have a long and strong future in front of them Bobby says of all the open bolt SMGs what are the top three fun and interesting I will restrict this to the ones that I've actually shot because I kind of have to and of those and we restrict it to open ville my top three favorite most interesting ones would be the Owen the Beretta 38 a specifically as...
opposed to the later iterations of the beretta and the zk 383 those three were all extremely pleasant guns to shoot very controllable and they they all have some interesting features to them so the bolt designs in all of them are a little bit more complex than just the simple like you'd have an ass 10 or most other open bolt guns so the ZK 383 has a removable weight lets you change the rate of fire the owen of course has this weird kind of firewall in the middle of it in the middle of the receiver and and then the beretta has a neat sort of it's basically a hammer built into an open bolt gun that I think is part of the reason why the beretta 38 a in particular is such a nice sweet controllable gun to shoot so all three of those were really cool when I was thinking about this question however I realized that ultimately my favorite submachine gun type firearms are in fact the closed bolt ones in particular the mp5 and the vz61 scorpion I really would love to have examples of those there are a lot of fun to shoot they're some of my very favorites to shoot on the rare occasions that I get to and I think part of the reason for that is that they are closed bolt thus they are capable of much better accuracy in in semi-auto fire and and it also lets them be lighter like you can get away from that open bolt thing of having this big heavy bolt it's just the chunka chunka chunka back and forth let's see max says when did you start considering yourself an expert on...
your material did or do you ever experience imposter syndrome I really try to avoid ever considering myself an expert on something I've gotten to the point where I have a lot like maybe too much you have lechon French rifles but the danger is if you ever take that label of expert and and like adopt it and use it yourself you're immediately shooting yourself in the foot because I don't care how much you know you never know everything and if you start assuming that you know everything you're gonna miss stuff there's there's always something new out there you I learned something new every single day even on French rifles a subject that I've been studying in a lot of depth for many years now so I don't ever want to be called an expert I don't like the term imposter syndrome for those of you who haven't heard the term before it's it's a phenomenon of people who are very successful in a field who have like this debilitating paranoia or maybe not that severe all the time but this they're always doubt self doubt and thinking well I can't possibly be as good at this as everyone thinks I am clearly they just haven't caught on to the fact that I don't know it and I think one of the best things you can do to prevent that is to be very upfront about the fact that you don't know everything I'm like I said I'm always learning something new and so to me I'd rather assume that I don't know it all and then I...
don't really have to worry about like are people you know am I just an impostor sneaking around somehow fooling you all that I know a lot oh no because I don't know nearly everything this is particularly hammered home when I get questions on Facebook about like what is this gun because 80% of them I don't know sorry about the dog she's angry at something and that that really kind of keeps it real like I have my area of specialty and I can answer some questions about that but it's a limited area of specialty and it's it's pretty focused LM says what was your favorite thing about the book that you learned when writing it my favorite things are often just little small details little factoids that explain substantial things like one of them would be what's like I learned what the truth is behind this common expectation a common understanding that the FAMAS can only shoot steel-cased ammo that's not true actually at all it's perfectly happy with brass cased ammo and I've ended up shooting almost exclusively brass cased ammo in mine where did that come from learning that was one of the really interesting things in the book and and every time I find a little detail probably one of the most recent ones was if you open up a Maus 44 or 49 or 49 56 and look at the hammer on like the when the hammer is cocked the top surface of it as you look down into the receiver has this little semi circular cutout and I never really thought about it until I...
saw someone point out that when you reassemble the gun I'm sorry one that the Hammers dropped not cocked when it's dropped you have this cutout on top when you reassemble the gun you put the bolt and bolt carrier in and then you put your thumb on the hammer and dry fire the gun then close the hammer and then when you go to put the recoil spring back in the gun it's one of these Springs that has a guide rod and it fits into a cavity in the bolt but you've got a you know like a third of the spring it has to be compressed as you put the top cover back on and it's it's kind of often liable to kink up or bounce out or you know it's a little unruly a little tricky to get in well if you drop the hammer that semicircular cut out acts as a little rest that you can push the spring down onto as you compress it and reassemble the gun much more easily so that's one of the things it's just this little any detail but it explains why is there this feature on this part because every single time there's a machining cut on any manufactured part there's a reason for it if there if there wasn't that cut wouldn't be there and so sometimes finding the explanation for some of these really kind of weird and obscure and seemingly pointless features to me that's some of the most interesting stuff out there Mantia says has anyone tried to change or adapt the a.k to use a short-stroke gas piston or even a DI system not to my knowledge I think that...
would require a fairly fundamental redesign of the gun because the a K doesn't have this easily distinctive upper/lower separation thing that the AR does you're gonna be building a brand new gun for it if you want a short-stroke gas piston a K got a Draganov perhaps and direct impingement no I've never seen anyone try to do that I think they found themselves a really good system in that gun with a long stroke gas piston and stuck to it Timothy has a repeat question would it have been better for Germany to adopt the Gewehr 98 in Paul mousers own battle-proven 7 by 57 cartridge rather than the existing 8 by 57 of the gr 88 especially considering the eventual changes that were made to 8 by 57 anyway in or diameter and Bullitt design which necessitated that they had to go rebuild all the rifles anyway also how would standardizing on 7 millimeter Mauser have affected German machine gun performance during World War 1 yeah I think everything would have been better if they had adopted the Mauser 98 the govenor 98 in seven Mauser instead of eight I think machine guns would have been fine in theory little less long-range performance in practice I don't think it would have mattered it's not a tremendous like it's not a fundamental improvement but it is definitely a quantitative improvement the rifles would have had a bit less recoil mo would have weighed a little bit less not so much that it would matter for a soldier in its basic load but you know when...
you're the guys carrying ten thousand rounds of Ltd ammo for the machine guns a little bit on each cartridge adds up pretty quickly so yeah I think that would have been there would have been no downsides and several quantifiable if not life-changing upsides to seven instead of eight now sir Andy says has any of your handling of older weapons given you ideas about how would you would design your own besides the what would stoner do project watching the channel has inspired me to come up with several designs one of which I'm actually in the process of patenting well congratulations good luck with it I have to say though what the more old the more variety of designs I handle the more I realized that the ones that we have standardized today are the standards for really good reasons and the more I handle the less interested I get in trying to design my own because every time you see a new design you're like oh well that possible change wouldn't have gone any better than what we have today I think what we have is an evolutionary process that has has focused firearms development today on guns that are really good and the guns that aren't around the forgotten weapons so to speak are almost always forgotten for a pretty darn good reason Keith says convince me I shouldn't buy a Mac m11 variant machine gun what are the downsides to machine gun ownership to clarify lesser-known downsides besides just cost well the transfer time is kind of annoying there aren't...
a whole lot of like subtle downsides that you won't recognize I guess make sure if you're gonna buy a machine gun make sure that the range that you plan to use it at allows full auto there are a lot of ranges out there that don't if you have your own private land not a problem but that's something to consider ultimately if if you want me to convince you not to buy a machine gun I think it's a pretty easy argument to make the argument is first off you're going to pay a massive increase in price compared to any sort of equivalent semi-auto gun because of the National Firearms Act and what that has done to the supply and demand equation in the United States so first off you're dumped a ton of money before you put the first round through it and is that worth it the second thing is even in a military sense most machine guns are not used as machine guns if it's a mounted gun yeah once you get something that's belted yes that's primarily used in bursts but when it comes to rifles or submachine guns semi-auto is virtually always the best way to use it and in even in military training usually it is taught as you always fire in semi-auto and full auto is for very exceptional circumstances so I think there's a very high likelihood that if you go through the money and go through the process and spend the money and buy a machine gun you're gonna discover that you know what actually yes it's fun to dump a magazine now and then but if you...
really want the gun to be effective its semi-auto like if you try and use any of these things in competition you're gonna realize I'm just as well off with a semi-auto version of the same thing you know the extra twenty five thousand dollars that I spent to have an m16 instead of an ar-15 gives me no competitive advantage what you're doing is spending a tremendous amount of money basically for a recreational benefit and some of these things maybe you're gonna discover that you're not even gonna use that recreational benefit very often anyway you know how many mags do you want to load I mean how many of those single stack Mac mags do you want to load when you know that it takes you about two seconds to empty them and your thumbs gonna get real sore from loading those things so you want me to convince you not to buy on that's how I would do it I would say find someone else who has won and borrow it or go to a rental range and rent one every now and then and you can spend you could spend a lot of time with a rental machine gun and end up paying less than owning one yourself and never have to go through the NFA process and not have your money sitting in a machine gun that you may discover you don't use very much Thomas says have you ever come across the

Galilean

sites used on World War one rifles I just finished reading snipers in the Great War by Martin pegler he recommends it as do i and apparently there are hardly any photos of them despite...
thousands being used I have seen them yes I have actually encountered a couple very actually I think I've encountered them on one rifle once and I'm I'm still very interested I would love to try actually shooting one but from look from the time that I was able to look at one like wow it's gonna suck it's really a poor alternative to a proper optic and it's not really like you might be better off with iron

sights

maybe so for those of you who aren't familiar the idea of a

Galilean

optical sight is basically think of a tubeless telescope so you've actually got a lens on the front and a lens on the back but nothing in between and this was something that was adopted by the British give us a stopgap measure early in World War one they didn't have a sniper program really they didn't have sniper scopes they didn't have anything really standardized and a couple of companies offered will build you

Galilean

sights

and they'll just clip onto existing rifles and there's basically no infrastructure to them they're relatively cheap because they're pretty simple you know you're making a couple lenses to have it's almost the equivalent of making a pair of eyeglasses where both sides are separate and you click one on the front and one on the back they do not offer much magnification it's like to power at best and they have a very small field of view you know these are they're called

Galilean

because they were the sort...
of tellest version of a telescope before a proper telescope was invented so I'd love to get a little more hands-on time with them and I would love to be able to bring you guys one on video but one time I was able to get a look at one I didn't have a camera and Pandy and wasn't able to do that and I think the reason that there are hardly any photos they were probably like counting the British were really wanting to advertise their sniper stuff at that time very few survived the war because they got rid of them I want to say by 1950 they basically scrapped that part of the program and that's a thing that's very easily broken very easily lost and why would anyone keep them you know if you're in the trenches in 1915 and you have the chance to get rid of this

Galilean

thing and get a proper scope are you gonna carry around those

Galilean

sights

for the rest of the war no you're gonna keep them Brackett says do property of US government markings or other similar markings have any legal effect for resale do they increase or decrease the value of a firearm interesting question having a gun or magazine marked property of US government does not carry any automatic legal status so just because it says it doesn't mean anything necessarily now if the gun is legally property of the US government and you're not allowed to have it if you're not authorized to have it if someone stole it from the government then you can get in trouble but you're...
getting in trouble because the gun is actually owned by the government not because of a marking on it there are a number of examples of things out there that are marked property of US government that are perfectly legal to own and usually that will increase their value the one that comes to mind most recently was the the Colt aircrewman revolvers they're marked property of US Air Force which is a really it's a cool feature on them and it really helps distinguish them from commercial similar commercial guns it did actually scare people at the time a few people a few of the guns I've actually had those marking ground off because people thought that they did have legally binding status you'll also find magazines that were manufactured during the assault weapons ban like 94 to 2004 that are marked law enforcement or like military law enforcement use only restricted some words to those effect those again have no legally binding status and to some people they're going to be a cool memento of that law that is no longer in effect so I'd say in general those markings as long as they're legitimate will increase the value I don't know of any situation where they would decrease the value Adam says before the NFA was passed in 1934 and suppressors started to be regulated at how common was their ownership why don't I ever see vintage suppressors for sale like I do old NFA guns so two-part question here I don't really have a good answer to the first...
half how common were suppressors how popular were they I don't really know you really only had one company selling them and that was Maxim run by Hiram Maxim's son and they were quite cheap but I don't know how many people actually use them now the second part of the question I have a better answer for that's why don't you see these things anymore the answer is because they were so cheap they're talking less than $10 for a suppressor and when the NFA came into effect it put a $200 tax on them and basically virtually nobody was willing to pay $200 in 1934 to keep their suppressor they just a lot of people didn't know that they became you know had to be registered the people who did know either threw them away or just put them in the back of the safe and didn't talk about it for a long time the NFA was not enforced the way it is today I know people who are pretty old but who remember the days when you know if you were out there shooting an unregistered machine gun and some cop caught you the punishment was like they send the gun to ATF and you have to pay the tax and they register it and they give it back to you like that's the punishment today people quake in fear at the idea of violating the NFA with an illegal machine gun and being subject to years in prison and hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines and never being able to legally own a firearm again for the rest of their lives that's a more recent phenomenon it used to be...
basically a slap on the wrist like if you get caught with it unregistered they're gonna make your register it so however legally technically speaking you cannot legally register an existing unregistered suppressor you can make a new one but you can't take an existing one and file paperwork to register it which is really unfortunate and that's probably the biggest reason why you don't see original vintage maximum suppressors for sale most of them weren't registered in the 30s most of them weren't registered you know the few we're probably registered in the amnesty in 1968 when that well when when monetary values had shifted a bit but today they're pretty much just underground things because they can't be legally registered legally they just have to be destroyed Kyle says hello in I was curious in your travels visiting different weapons collections and museums if you have come across the night

sights

for World War 1 rifles yes yes I have actually I have a set on a French Air ta which should probably surprise nobody both the French and the Germans made fairly reasonable use of luminous night

sights

I don't know the exact formulation it was basically a luminous paint that was applied on 2 X basically slightly oversized dots two dots in the rear one dot on the front sight to give you glow in the dark night

sights

the French did this as a permanent feature on the birthday for a little while around 1917 both the French and the Germans also had...
clip-on night

sights

I don't think the Germans ever did a permanent night sight I think theirs were all clip-on variety the French also put this sort of night

sights

on their machine guns so the Hotchkiss 1914 guns in World War one had night

sights

in fact they had them but many more of the machine guns had them than rifles having the machine guns Aimable and usable at night is more important than having individual rifles usable that way so yeah they were out there and they were not particularly rare they're not super common they're not everywhere but they're far from the scarcest sort of accessory or modification to World War one rifle John says with the drying up of parts kits from the soap former Soviet bloc countries we've seen a lot of US manufacturers ramped up production in-house with 100 percent

american

-made a que pattern rifles however very universally seen as inferior and garbage when compared to their parts kit or factory made counterparts for a variety of reasons why is that is there historical anecdote like growing pains the Soviet faced with developing stamped receivers it's applicable I have trouble understanding why a country with significant manufacturing infrastructure and technique cannot produce a rifle of similar if not better quality than the aks produced in countries with much more significant economic hardship so there are I think first we have a bit of a misconception here hunt you're referring to countries that originally...
made a case as having economic hardships that may have been the case if you are an individual citizen trying to buy some various consumer good however almost those government's pretty much across the board put a high emphasis on having good weapons and these guns weren't built on a budget and the problem the fundamental problem with

American

made a case is that they are built on a budget so the problem is the Soviet bloc everyone who's building a case and in fact it literally was everyone like sort of maybe Albania or North Korea there were no like cheap not-so-great aks out there the Bulgarian aks the Polish ak's the Hungarian aks the Romanian a cage that Russian aks the Chinese aks these are all excellent guns they're extremely well made and then they come in to the US have that manufacturing cost all gets paid by the government when they're being manufactured and then the wall falls Soviet bloc disintegrates and those guns are now being sold off by people who have zero money invested in them and there's lots of them and so they sell them cheap and they come into the United States at rillette prices that are ludicrously low compared to the amount of effort and expense that went into making them and that's that's where we get this idea that aks are cheap rifles to make they're not cheap rifles to make they just happen to be cheap rifles for us to buy second-hand because so many of them were made to very high standards many many years...
ago so the problem with

american

-made ones is that they're trying to compete with say a parts kit made in Poland in the 60s that would have cost thousands of dollars for that rifle to be made here today but if I can go buy a Polish parts kit ill gun for 600 bucks why would I spend any more than that on an

american

-made gun like the

american

-made guns got to be as good and for the

american

-made gun to be made as well it's price is gonna be huge comparatively speaking so all of the

American

manufacturers feel they have well have to compete price-wise with guns whose manufacturing cost has already been paid by someone else and so they have to do it on a budget it's not that we can't make a good AAA in the United States you absolutely could it just would require spending the same amount of of money you know having the same quality and the same attention to detail which turns into the same amount of money as the Soviet bloc countries did when they originally built those guns Zachary says what loadout or theme would you like to run desert route alley 2020 with that is an interesting question that I have thought about a little bit so in general at regular to gun matches I enjoy running weird obscure guns kind of fun it doesn't really matter so much if they're really craptacular guns if they are if I kind of know going in that they're gonna be difficult and not go well and my scores are gonna be bad that's not a big deal on a regular monthly to got...
matches and it's interesting to get the experience when it comes to desert brutality this is a match that I know going in is going to be physically challenging and exhausting the last couple of years well this past year it was up in st. George Utah so I was gonna drive eight hours to get there and then eight hours again after the match and as you know it's gonna be like five days spent doing this match including all the travel I don't want to have a gun that actively is going to work against me I want to be able to enjoy the match now that doesn't mean has to be you know a completely modern gun I shot the first desert brutality with a semi-auto FAMAS that was a tremendous amount of fun a very cool experience I shot this year's desert brutality with a Brownells retro 605 which again great gun ran perfectly it's it's an early ar-15 the ergonomics are good the cartridge is good the

sights

are good the trigger was good it was a gun that it wasn't 100% modern didn't have optics that's but it didn't hold me back and so that's kind of what I want to do for any future desert brutality I want to find a gun that is both interesting but also fundamentally a good gun that I can run the match well with and so the three that I'm that have come to mind and I'm far from having made any decision I obviously need to talk to Carl about it because often we try and mesh what we're doing so that my guns and his complement each other in...
some way but the three that occurred to me in m1 garand I think that that would be like hard mode but in m1 has great trigger great

sights

the end block clips are pretty quick and easy to reload I think that would be a lot of fun I would love to do one with aster MacGyver I think that would be a really interesting and fun experience and I think again in that case you're looking at a self-loading high-capacity magazine decent

sights

decent trigger you know there's nothing fundamentally bad about that gun what would be really cool is to run it with a legit NFA select-fire stern Gewehr that would be awesome if HMG ever has their guns out on the market that would be 80% as cool and that would be a fun one to do like I'd be excited about doing that with a semi-auto reproduction Sturm affair or what would stoner do carbine and that in some ways that would be that's that's easy mode like that would allow me to really see how well I can do in competition with the best rifle that I can come up with to take so I kind of feel that sort of like that cheating not cheating but like taking the easy route by taking a what what stoner do carbine but that would be fine so that's what I'm thinking of who knows I've got a while to figure that one out alright and our very last question is dr. Joe mama chubby says what gun are you guns are you currently chasing to get your hands on to review or to own there's always something got the hots to own however there is...
a gun that I've been looking for for quite some time now to do a video on because I've actually already done the first half of the video and it's been sitting there waiting for over a year now I'm just waiting for access to the gun and the gun is a Cal Toph repeater which is basically the very first repeating military firearms and the second half of the video that I've already done was done at the location where the Celt off repeater was first used in actual military combat and so when I had the opportunity to be there I realized you know this would be super cool I can do here's here's the first repeating gun and here is physically where it was first used so I have the geographical part there aren't exactly a lot of Celt off repeaters floating around and I think like virtually all of them are in Europe so sooner or later I will get my hands on one and when I do then I'll be able to finish off that video so that's one that I'm always keeping my eye out for and that is all of our questions for today so I haven't quite caught horse yet a big thank you to all of my patrons who submitted questions you guys truly make forgotten weapons possible and deeply appreciate it so we'll be back again next month with another Q&A thanks for watching