YTread Logo
YTread Logo

Eye Glass Case with a Hidden Surprise

Eye Glass Case with a Hidden Surprise
Welcome to SewVeryEasy, my name is Laura. I know we can buy eye

glass

case

s, but there's something fun about making them. We can make them the size we want, the fabric we want, and we can always add a

hidden

surprise

. We're going to need two pieces of fabric: One for the outside, one for the inside, and a piece of this sewable foam. I'm starting with a piece that's 9½" square. From there I just want to make sure that my

glass

es are going to fit inside with room to spare. If
eye glass case with a hidden surprise
you need it bigger than 9½", do this right at the very beginning. The sun

glass

case

is a drawstring pouch so we're going to need a little bit of a drawstring and these little clips for the end of the string. They're going to keep that pouch closed. If you happen to have a cleaning cloth for your

glass

es, this will be another thing we're going to be able to add. So depending on the size of your

glass

es, you'll have to adjust your fabric. I have a 9½" piece of foam, and
fabric that's a little bit bigger. The first thing I want to do is quilt the top fabric to my foam. This is another reason why it's nice to have it a little bit bigger. The

case

is going to have one seam along the side and one along the bottom, so you can always fussy-cut your fabric to fit. Put that sewable foam on top of your fabric and do a couple of rows of stitching. You can always use quilt batting, but the foam has a little bit more stability to it and it's a little bit
thicker so it's going to protect the

glass

es more. And, you can quilt over top of it without having to have another piece of fabric. It can also be quilted any way you'd like. The quilt pattern I chose was just a crosshatch with a 1½" space. When you do quilt, it does shrink a little bit and that's why it's nice to start with something a little bit bigger. From here we're going to do a little bit of sewing first, and then we're going to trim off the seam allowances.
Put right sides together of both fabrics. Following the top of the foam, do a row of straight stitching, and get as close as you can to the foam. Stitch that line coming on and off the fabric. We now have those pieces stuck together at the top. It's really easy to work with this because we have some extra to hold onto. We need to do two row of stitching down the sides but we're only going to do a very little bit. But first we're going to draw some little lines to give us some
markings from the top down. Put a ¼" mark on both sides. From that line down do a ½". One more measurement, and that'll be ¼". So from the top of the foam, we're 1". This is what it looks like. We have that ¼", the ½", and the ¼". We need to stitch this top ¼" and the bottom ¼", but we're going to leave this piece open. We do it to both sides, and we can stitch right along the edge of this foam. Do a little bit of a back stitch
eye glass case with a hidden surprise
here and a little bit of a back stitch here. Do that to both sides. It's really hard to see it on the back, but I do have some stitching here and some stitching there, and that's that ½" opening. The next thing we will do is trim a seam allowance. The seam allowance is going to be cut from the outside over so if you want a ¼", you're going to need to leave a ¼". If you want ½", we need a ½". So whatever your seam allowance is, that's what you're
going to need to cut all the way around this piece of foam. With that extra trimmed off we'll be able to finish stitching the bag. We have that top row stitched and a little bit up at the top. When we open it up we will notice a portion stitched right here at the top. We're going to be able to put this bag together. Take this and open it up. Pull the lining to one side and the bag to the other. We're going to have that little bit stitched up here at the top. Fold this right in half.
We need to match up those seams. That 1" little stitching we did is going to be the top of the drawstring of the bag, so we need to keep that out of the way. Matching up those seams, stitch down the lining all the way. When you get to the corner, come all the way off to the end so you're stitching a big L. The stitching along the outside of the bag has made the outside of the bag finished. Roll that top fabric down. Those seams will automatically match up. Start stitching right there
where the threads end and come all the way down. Leave the bottom of the bag open because we will need this to turn the whole bag rightside-out. We have the front of the bag stitched together and the lining of the bag stitched together, and we have that flap up at the top. Snip off a little bit of the fabric on the two corners of the front of the lining and on the two corners of the front of the bag. We just want to remove a little extra fabric so there's not so much bulk in those corners.
Take the bag and turn it right-side out. Be sure to poke out the corners of the bottom of the front of the bag. Up at the top you're going to have two areas that you're going to be able to poke out. Those were at the very top. Turn those raw edges so that they're facing inside. This is where you can add a cleaning cloth. By adding it into the bottom of the bag it means it will always be there when you need it. I want to just tuck one of those corners in. Do a row of top stitch so
eye glass case with a hidden surprise
I'm closing the bottom of the bag off but I'm also holding this cloth in. I now will always have my cleaning cloth handy. Push that lining into the inside of the bag. To finish this up we need to do two rows of stitching along the top of the bag. Be sure to tuck the lining in so you have that nice straight edge along the top. Be sure those pins are out of the way as we do those two rows of stitching. The first one is going to be that ¼" all the way around. The second one is going
to be that ½" space. So we're duplicating the measurements in this little top. This little 1" area is where we're going to be able to put the drawstring. You can feed this in through the good old safety pin way or use a flexible bodkin. A flexible bodkin is designed so that it can fit into small areas. That little ½" is that opening we left right at the very beginning. We're going to be able to get that in and it's going to go all the way around. These little
stoppers often come in packages of two. You can also get them singular. Be sure that the string will fit inside the holes of these little stoppers. I can tape each end of my string so that they don't fray. They would be like shoelace ends. Squeeze the unit together and, just like a shoelace, thread the end through the holes. You need both ends coming out in the same direction.T This little piece is a lock and it's going to lock the string into the position that you stopped that lock at.
When you squeeze it open you'll be able to move in either direction, but as soon as you let go it locks it. For the end, we're going to be able to take this and tie it into a knot. That knot will prevent the lock from coming off. You can trim off the ends and let them fray. Now we have that stopper on the end of the bag, so the lock is not going to come off, but it will also lock the bag closed. The ends of the string do not have to be overly long; just enough that you can hold onto
them. The great part about this

case

is not only does it store my

glass

es, but I can reach in and pull out that lining which has my eye

glass

cleaner. I'm going to be able to clean my

glass

es and then stick that lining right back in the bag. Now I will always have my eye

glass

cleaner right handy in my

case

. I have it the size I want, the fabric I want, and I have the great advantage of having a little

hidden

surprise

: A built-in cleaning cloth that I know I will never lose. It will be there
when I need it. Thank you for joining me today on SewVery Easy. Feel free to subscribe and, as always, come on back. Let's see what we're sewing next time in the sewing room. Bye for now!