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Rocket Powered Golf Club at 100,000 FPS

May 29, 2021
This is a

rocket

powered

golf

club

. Professional

golf

ers have an average swing speed of 110 miles per hour. But using two F-size motors, it turns a hundred and fifty miles per hour, every time. Usually for builds on my channel I just show you the latest and don't really talk about the process of how we got there. But rest assured, we're going to see some big pushes today, WOW! golf balls breaking glass in super slow motion, pulverized watermelon and even a portable version. But I think this build is a great opportunity to pull back the curtain and demonstrate how the engineering design process really works.
rocket powered golf club at 100 000 fps
I want to highlight six: "Learning Opportunities" that led us to this final design, and to do that we need to go back in time four months, when I first had the idea. And as always, we started with a simple prototype to see if the concept had a remote chance of working. Before you turn it on, you'll notice that we have counterweights on the opposite side here. That is so that the center of mass of the rotating part is above the axis of rotation. In other words, it balances perfectly at the point where it turns. If you don't do that for something spinning, it creates a lot of extra force for your system to take care of.
rocket powered golf club at 100 000 fps

More Interesting Facts About,

rocket powered golf club at 100 000 fps...

It starts out as a little vibration, but then it gets worse and worse as speed increases. Since we needed to hit this little ball with the head of this

club

at really high speeds, if we're not perfectly balanced, the club and the whole deck will shake all over the place and we'd never hit it. Ok back to the test Those brackets are shaking more than they should so we knew we would need to balance the rotating part better for the actual test But at least we knew it could go a little fast and nothing would blow And so it was time for CAD Which it always is the next step and then together with my friends, Ken and Kayla.
rocket powered golf club at 100 000 fps
We started by cutting metal and fabricating things. Things clicked together well, so we attached an epoxy 3D printed motor mount to the top of the controller and set up our first real test by taking one of those simple ups and attaching some netting to the side for safety just in case. something went catastrophically wrong. This was our second learning experience, we didn't have enough contact area to epoxy the head onto the driver. So it wasn't a strong enough bond. This was tricky because it meant we had to 3D scan the clubhead, which allowed us to CAD and then 3D print a more contoured saddle with more contact area for the epoxy.
rocket powered golf club at 100 000 fps
We also took this opportunity to double up on the

rocket

sleeves because what could possibly go wrong? So we went to test our new dual rocket setup with two e motors and everything went perfectly Except for the part where the head came off the controller And when we reviewed the slow motion footage, we realized that the axis of the The controller is so flexible that it would start to bend AND then it would create really weird thrust vectors for the rockets which would then bend the axis even more. This is not what you want to see.
Eventually it exceeded the stress limit of the shaft and the head just came off. So our third learning opportunity was to stiffen the shaft of the club. So we got an aluminum C-channel and just dumped a ton of epoxy in there and this worked great. , you can see the difference here. And with that we headed to a very remote shooting location in beautiful Northern California So we finally got there and started to get ready but first I have something I wanted to get off my chest so one of my favorite things about myself . is that I would like to approach lesser known channels and give them a hand with some exposure on my channel.
That's why I'm here today with Destin And Smarter Every Day and if by some miracle you don't I know Destin is on Mount Rushmore We science youtubers have been friends for almost exactly six years and I know because I took a screenshot of big moment screen for me when he subscribed to my channel when he only had 10,000 subscribers. He has made videos. about the physics of cats landing on their feet, tattoos in super slow motion, or the first video I ever saw of him about how chickens have an internal open feedback loop that allows them to keep track if you've never seen their stuff. really jealous because you have so many hours of high-quality viewing in your near future.
So I like golf. I like the Rockets. Should we do this? Yeah, let's... That was the introduction, right? That was it. Anyway, we all proceeded with the installation and one thing that was important to me was that it looked as natural as possible on a driving range, so we added some grass to cover the base plate and then we dissected a golf bag to cover the base plate. solid steel column. and then if you add some sticks it looks pretty awesome. It's incredibly stiff, and yet you can still swing freely. Our fourth learning experience came from reviewing our final test material.
If you listen, the stick goes faster and faster with each rotation. Naturally, we want the stick. to make contact with the ball when it's going faster, which in our case is ten rotations in a second, which means we need to somehow sneak the ball into the driver's path in less than a tenth of a second or a quarter of a second. a blink to achieve it. this we have a pneumatic cylinder here that articulates the tee It knows when to fire because on the back of the shaft There is a light sensor and this disk has a slot that allows light to pass through once per rotation So we send that information to an Arduino here which counts for us and then after 15 rotations it tells the cylinder the precise moment to fire using a solenoid and then we glue the ball to the tee because it provides the Goldilocks amount of force to first secure and then release the ball and the super glue is looks cool in slow motion So now with everything in place we start with two electronic motors which is a Reminder it's the same setup that ripped the clubhead three two one roll where did it go? ?
What happened? YES BABY!! There's no way it's going to be a cool shot right there. is Dude this is uh, this is respectable This is legit after reviewing more high speed images. We noticed something interesting. The sound effect is like "do yoy yoy". This was an interesting technical observation from Destin and that the flex of the tee was causing us to hit some bad shots like this. The obvious solution is to make the tee stiffer so it doesn't twist too much when it pops up But there is a problem with this There is a saying that strength follows stiffness and for us a really stiff tee would transfer a lot of force and ​​it would destroy our nice 3d printed pop up mechanism.
Now imagine this crumpled up. The piece of paper facing up is the tee which is obviously much less rigid. Our flexible rubber tee was great because it acted like this piece of paper no matter how hard you hit it. The force doesn't translate down and damage our hardware. So Ken had the bright idea of ​​simply tying a string to the tee and sticking it into the ground. This stopped the excessive rotation but everything was still just as flexible when the string is tightened. Does it make the ball fly out because it doesn't? Are you not doing enough?
Uh the only way to test is the doink test Ahhh beautiful there was some doinkage I just thought this was a really simple clever idea that solved both problems at once and as you can see it worked perfectly Now we are ready to test a dual F motor So these deliver about twice the force to the club as the head-smashing e motors and this provided our last and certainly most poignant learning opportunity. 3 2 1 go Where is the club Is, is, is the tree on fire? Wow, like I'm laughing, but that could have been bad. There we go, this thing was like some suborbital dude.
So, we have three u-bolts and we only use two. points and I hear you say, oh, we have a solution for that. This is the engineering design process! Rather fun. As I mentioned, the failed stick was cut too short and was only held on with two U-bolts which we thought would have been enough to withstand the 800 pound load of centrifugal force. We noticed that the rubber grip was worn from so many test fires. which likely initiated the stress concentration that led to the failure. So our solution was to cut the next Club longer so we could use three U-bolts and really tighten them down with a new rubber grip and just like that, with all our six learns now in place, I tried the Insane double F motors one more time!
WOW! YES BABY!! WE GO!! This is how you play golf! That's our best yet! Guy. Like the high you get from an engineering achievement actually working. Really friend. Oh look at the flame. Oh yeah! So we never found these long balls to measure the exact distance. But I can drive a ball 280 yards and these were way beyond that. I mean, just look at this trajectory directly into outer space. Now that we have all the shots we need, it's time to have some real fun. We started with a portable version that was

powered

by a single C motor because anything more than that would just be too unsafe for me to hold Ni-ice! over 300 yards man!
It really made it so much easier to swing. I'm not even kidding. Yeah yeah yeah like it really means different 3 2 and then some glass just because YES! And then, following the tradition of my channel, some watermelon. Thanks for opening a watermelon with a rocket propelled driver Mark. No problem. Yes, that's all this. The last three months of engineering work were just for this. It comes down to this moment just to enjoy this watermelon. Yes, Mark tries to make things look good. We're not wasting food, although we're not wasting some of the engineering effort like the big Indians with Buffalo, which is why Destin made a video on his channel about why some balls bounce high and others don't. t and my first thought was well, that's easy, it just has to do with how squeezable or rubbery it is.
However, this billiard ball is completely solid and this bouncing ball is quite rubbery and yet they bounce at pretty much the same height. So it's something else. . As you can imagine, this is pretty important information for golf ball manufacturers, so there's plenty of incredible slow-motion footage of golf balls being crushed in ways that damage your brain, plus plenty more footage from today's session. . I'll leave a link in the video description. And while you're there, be sure to check out some of his other videos and subscribe to his channel because he is a classy person and a true professional in every sense of the word.
Are you rolling? yes hi it's me mark

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