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Diatonic 7th Chords of Major Keys

Apr 18, 2024
How is it that some people can listen to music and instantly be able to play the

chords

by ear without reading any sheet music or chord chart? Are they just geniuses? Well, maybe some of them are, but most people who can do this simply have training. Their ears recognize different chord progressions and have a great knowledge of something called

diatonic

chords

, so the good news is that you don't have to be some kind of genius to be able to train your ear, you just have to put in the time and practice. and the best place to start this process is to learn about

diatonic

chords later in this video.
diatonic 7th chords of major keys
I'll show you how you can apply your knowledge of diatonic chords to discover chord progressions by ear. I already made a video about diatonic chords in

major

keys

where we analyzed diatonic chords as triads but in today's lesson we are going to analyze diatonic chords in

major

keys

as seventh chords instead of triads. If you are new to this topic, I recommend that you Watch that video first and I've linked it in the description below. I'll still give a quick overview in this video, so if you get bored or if you just want to skip to the quick and easy pattern that I show you later in the video, you can skip to either one.
diatonic 7th chords of major keys

More Interesting Facts About,

diatonic 7th chords of major keys...

In another section using the beat markings in the description below, let's first quickly discuss what diatonic chords are. The term may sound fancy, but you can actually think of diatonic chords as a close-knit family of chords connected to a key, for example in the treble clef. major we have a group of diatonic chords that are these here and in the key of C major we have another group of diatonic chords that are these here and so on in each key, just like a very fast side note, many chords will appear. Since they are diatonic chords of multiple different keys, for example, you can see here that E minor 7 and a minor 7 can be seen in the keys of G major and C major.
diatonic 7th chords of major keys
We see them in both groups, however, they fulfill different harmonious functions. Depending on what tone we are in, we can delve into this another day. I'm just pointing this out to you now so you understand that it's okay for a chord to be a diatonic chord of multiple different pitches. I do not like you. You should be confused if you see the same chords appearing in different sets of diatonic chords anyway. Going back to our question, what are diatonic chords? So we already said that they are a close-knit family of chords connected to a specific key, so what does that mean? that means if you play a song in the key of G major, okay there's a good chance you'll see some of these chords in the song, that's because these chords are the diatonic G major chords, now you might see others.
diatonic 7th chords of major keys
The chords in the song can also have any chords they want, not just the diatonic chords, but they most likely have many of these diatonic chords now, why are these chords connected to the key of G major? The reason is because the notes that make up these chords are just notes that are in a G major scale. Let me show you what I mean if that doesn't make any sense, so first let's write a G major scale and now the notes in our G major scale. they are g a b c d e f sharp but the scale can keep repeating infinitely in any direction so after this f sharp I could keep writing the notes in the scale so after f sharp we go back to g again and after g we have a, after a we have b c and so on, now to create the first diatonic chord in our key, we are going to start at the root note of the scale which is g and we are going to go up in thirds or, if it is easier to think of it this way, we are just going to jump over one note to move on to the next, let me show you, so we start with the note g, then we jump over a and we get to b, then we jump over c, we get to d and then we jump over e. and we get to F sharp and that's it, these notes G B D and F sharp are the notes in our first diatonic seventh chord for the key of G major and when I play these four notes together G B F sharp the chord I'm playing is called G major seven chord and therefore G major seven is our first diatonic chord in the key of G major, so we'll write its name right below there.
Let's figure out the second diatonic chord using the same method of going up in thirds or jumping over every two notes so that this At that point we will build a chord from the second note of the scale, which is the right one, so we will start at A, then we'll jump over B and we'll get to C, then we'll jump over D and we'll get to e and then we'll jump over F sharp and we'll get to G and that's it, these four notes to C and G are the notes of our second diatonic seventh chord in the key of G major and when I play these four notes together a ce and g it sounds like this and the chord I'm playing is called a minor seventh chord, therefore a minor seven is the second diatonic chord in the key of G major.
I drew this one a little lower just to make room for all the different chords. let's write and just to clarify, so these four notes here are the four notes that are in the first diatonic chord and those four notes make up this chord which is G major seven, just as a heads up when you see a triangle which is an abbreviated symbol of the word major so this is G major seven that is the name of the chord and these are the notes of the chord these are the notes of the chord and this is the name of the chord and this chord is a minor Seven, okay, and when If you see a lowercase m and a chord, it is an abbreviated symbol for minor.
Now let's figure out the third diatonic chord using the same method of going up in thirds or jumping over every two notes, so this time we'll build the chord. starting from the third note in the scale which is B on the right, so we start on B, then we jump over C and we get to D, then we jump over E and we get to F sharp, then we jump over G and we get to A. the four notes in this chord are b d f sharp and a and when I play these four notes together they sound like this b d fa and the chord I'm playing is called b minor seven, so b minor seven is the third diatonic chord in the key of G major b minor seven now just as a quick side note on my previous video on major key diatonic triad chords, which is kind of like the video for part one and this is kind of like the video for part two where We discovered all these diatonic chords as triads instead of seventh chords Now what is the difference between a triad chord and a seventh chord?
A triad is a chord that only has three notes and a seventh chord is a chord that has four notes. I know it may seem strange that a seventh chord has four notes because you would assume that a seventh chord would have seven notes, but it doesn't, it only has four. It is called a seventh chord because the fourth note of the chord is one seventh away from the root note. of the chord, for example, in this B minor seven chord, the interval distance between B and A is one seventh and in the minor seventh chord, the interval distance between A and G is also one seventh, don't worry too much for this, right?
Now, if you want to learn more about the names of these different 7th chords, I have a video on the main types of 7th chords linked in the description below, but going forward, the main reason I mention this is I want to show you how. The diatonic triad chords I saw in my previous video differ from the diatonic 7th chords I'm going over in this video, so if I were calculating the notes of diatonic chords as triads, we would simply stop after the third note, like this that, for example, if we were discovering the first diatonic chord as a triad, we start on the note G, which is the first note in the scale, then we skip one note and get to B, then we skip another note and get to D, and When we play just those three notes together G, B, and D, the chord is called a G major chord or G major triad.
If we wanted this first diatonic chord to be a seventh chord instead of a triad, we would just add that extra note at the end, so after d we would jump over e and get to F sharp and then we would get a G major seven chord, so a normal old G major triad chord would be just G b and D, whereas in that we would just write the name of the chord like this, whereas a G major seventh chord is G B D F sharp and that's the G major seven that's there. I'll also play them for you, so here's our G major triad G B D and then here's our G major 7 chord G B D F G major G major 7.
If we wanted to figure out the second diatonic chord as a triad, we'd just do the same thing, we'd just need three notes instead of four, so we would leave out the last note which is G, so the chord would be a C, a C, nice and simple, it's just a plain old A minor. chord or a minor triad, if we wanted to discover the second diatonic chord as a seventh chord, we would add that extra g note at the end and then it would become a minor seventh chord, so it would be an A minor chord just an a. minor triad to c e that's just an A minor triad and then if we have a minor seventh chord to c e g a minor seventh chord, then a minor seven, now solve this for me, how about this diatonic third chord if we wanted to figure out the ? notes in this chord as a triad, what would the notes be?
We would start in the same place b jump over c we will get to d we jump e we will get to F sharp but then we would stop at F sharp so we would just play the notes I'll draw a little line here if D and F sharp so we would skip that fourth note and if we play If D and F sharp together, this chord is a B minor chord or a B minor triad and if we wanted the Si chord to be a 7th chord, we would simply add that to at the end we would jump once more from F sharp to get to that a and then we would have the seventh chord which is B minor seven, so a B minor triad sounds like this B D F sharp and A B minor seventh chord sounds like this B D F A so we have a B minor triad and then a seventh chord minor.
Now you may be wondering: why do we have two sets of diatonic chords? You know, one of them is triad and one of them is seventh chords, which chord should I try to practice and memorize? The 7th chords are the triads and all I will say is that you can really think of them as being very similar to each other and please, whatever you do, don't stress yourself out too much. Right now there is a lot of difference between them because for the most part they fulfill many of the same harmonic functions and in fact they can often be quite interchangeable, not always, but most of the time, all I will say is that if you want Focus on learning something else.
At first it's simple, just practice, play and learn the diatonic triad chords. If you want to delve a little deeper into these diatonic chords, play them and practice them as seventh chords so you'll learn all four possible notes by the end of the day. It won't hurt to practice them one way or another, practicing and memorizing one or both will be valuable, so do what feels right to you and what you think you can handle at the moment if you just practice them as triads. that's totally cool and will make it a thousand times easier to learn them as 7th chords later on if you love the way 7th chords sound and want to practice them as 7th chords from the beginning then go for it, you really can't lose no way now.
Let's not talk about triads anymore in this video because this video is about seventh chords, so let's figure out the fourth diatonic chord using the same method of going up in thirds, so we start on the fourth note of the scale, which is c, and then we jump d and we get to e then we jump over F sharp and we get to g then we jump over a and we get to b then the notes are C G and B and when I play these four notes together C G and if the chord I'm playing it's called a C major seventh chord, therefore , C major seven is the diatonic fourth chord in the key of G major and this is what C major seven sounds like.
Now let's figure out the diatonic fifth chord, so we'll start with the fifth. note of the scale what is it, tell me what is d just then we jump over the next note which is e and we get to f sharp then we jump over g we get to a and then we jump over b and we get to c then the the notes we have are d f sharp a and c and when I play these four notes together d f sharp a and c the chord I'm playing is called a d dominant seven chord and people usually refer to this chord as d7 for short so I'm just going to write d7 so whenever you see a chord like that one looks like it says d7, its real name is d dominant seven, but we just call it d7 for short, so d7 or dominant seven is the diatonic fifth chord in the key of G major and this is what it sounds like d f to c d dominant seven just as a side note if you're enjoying this video so far don't forget to like and leave a comment tosay hello and if you are new to my channel don't forget to subscribe if you want to see more videos like this in the future.
Now let's discover the sixth diatonic chord in the key of G major, so we'll build this chord starting from the sixth note in the G major scale, which is you tell me it's e, but since we're going off the page, I'm going to delete them just to make a little more space, so I'm going to move those notes e and f sharp over just a hair, so e and f sharp, so this chord will have four notes, one, two, three and four, so why Don't you tell me what those four notes will be good for the first note that we know to be?
You're right, one is easy e for easy, okay, so we'll skip this note and get two, whose note comes after F sharp in the scale, it's g, so we'll get to g, okay, so you know the next one. we're going to jump over g, we're going to jump over a and get to b, so how about the last one where we're going to be at b, we're going to jump over c and we're going to get to d, so the notes? are e g b and d and when I play these four notes together the name of the chord I'm playing is called E minor minor seventh chord so E minor seven is the diatonic sixth chord in the key of G major and this is what E sounds like seven and last but not least, let's discover the diatonic seventh chord in the key of G major, so we will build this chord starting from the seventh note in the scale which is F sharp, so this chord has, we know it has four notes, okay, and what's the first note, it's going to be F sharp, that's our starting point, okay, and then what comes after F sharp, after F sharp, we're going to jump over g to the right and we land on a sof sharp at a then we jump over b and get to c let me try to figure this out after c we have e right so the notes are f sharp a c and e and when I play these four notes together f sharp a c and e the chord I'm playing is called f sharp minor seven flat five also known as F sharp half diminished seven so people can see this chord written like this f sharp minor seven five flat or for F sharp half diminished this symbol like this is a little symbol for half diminished so this says f sharp half diminished seven and this says F sharp minor seven flat five these are actually just two different names for the same chord so you can call it either one and if you call it F sharp half diminished seven or F sharp minor seven five five which is the diatonic seventh chord in the key of G major and this is what F sharp C E sounds like so how can you see these seven diatonic chords G major seven A minor seven C major seven D seven oh, I forgot B minor seven E minor seven and F sharps have diminished seven, all seven chords were created using the notes in the correct G major scale, I don't see the note, for example, a flat in any of these chords, why is a flat not a note in the G major scale ?
Diatonic chords in a key are only made up of notes in the corresponding scale, which in this case is a G major scale, so the only notes in these chords are the notes in a G major scale. It makes sense now, it would be pretty crazy if the way you had to calculate the notes in each diatonic chord was using this method of movement. in thirds and you had to think about this whole process every time, but fortunately there is a very simple pattern that we can follow to discover the diatonic chords of any major key in a much easier way, so let's first identify the quality of the chords of each one of them.
These chords I rewrote all to make them look a little cleaner, so let's first identify the chord quality of each of these chords, that is, what type of seventh chord each of these seven diatonic chords are. Okay, so the first one is a major seventh chord. so I'm just going to write a major seventh, okay, the second one is a minor seventh chord, so I'm ignoring the root of each of these chords, I'm just looking at their quality, so I say, okay, this is a chord of a minor seventh this one here the third is also a minor seventh chord right what about this fourth this fourth is a major seventh right now the fifth this is a dominant seven?
Well, then we'll just do a seven. the sixth is a right minor seventh and then the seventh is a half diminished seventh chord, so I'll write a half diminished seven and guess what the interesting part is: diatonic chords always follow the exact same pattern. Okay, so the first diatonic chord. a chord in a major key will always be a major seventh chord the second will always be a minor seventh chord the third will always be a minor seventh chord the fourth will always be a major seventh chord the fifth will always be a dominant seven, the sixth will always be a minor seven and the seventh will always be a half diminished seven, so let me show you how easy it can be to discover the diatonic chords of any major key if we know this pattern, first let's write this pattern of chord qualities using Roman numerals because it is It's very important that we start thinking about diatonic chords as numbers so we can start applying them to things like chord progressions and analyzing their harmonic function if That sounds like gibberish to you, don't worry, stay with me here, so for the first chord we are going to write a number one as a Roman numeral, since it is the first chord, but this is what happens when we have a major chord. write a number one in uppercase and whenever we have a minor chord we are going to write a number one in lowercase, so is this first chord a major or minor chord?
G major seven, it's a major chord, so we're going to write a Roman numeral in capital letters. one like this and since it's a seventh chord, we can also write a little number seven after it. If we wrote this chord alone as a triad, we would have it as the uppercase number one, but since it is also a seventh chord, we add this. the little number seven after and we don't write the little seven as a Roman numeral just a normal seven, don't ask me why it is like that, so now let's write the second quality of the chord as a Roman numeral, so we are.
I'm going to write a number two because it's the second chord on the scale to the right, but will it be uppercase or lowercase since it's a minor chord? A minor seven will be lowercase so let's write two like that and then with a little seven next to it since it's a minor seventh chord now let's write the third chord as a Roman numeral so let's write a number three right because it's the third chord, but will it be uppercase or lowercase? Tell me it will be lower case. because it's a minor chord right B minor seven so we're going to write the number three in lowercase Roman numerals with a seven like this, how about the fourth chord we write this as a capital or lowercase number four, since this is a major chord we'll write it like a capital four like this is my roman numeral capital four and then I'm going to put a little seven next to it okay, this one is a little more complicated how about fifth chord uppercase or lowercase number five this one? one is more complicated because this chord is a dominant 7th chord that doesn't have the word major or minor in its name, so it's not as obvious, but a dominant 7th chord is a type of major chord, why is it?
I know why a dominant seventh? The chord is a major triad D F sharp a with a minor seventh which is the added c note and although it has a minor seventh it is still generally a major chord because the base of the chord, the essence of the chord, is that major triad which is d f sharp and a I don't want to go into this too much because I talk a lot more about these things in detail in my easy chord theory video on 7th chords which, as I mentioned above, is linked below, but I think it's worth it take a little tangent to explain this and all I will say is that if you don't fully understand what I'm about to say, don't worry about it for now, just keep watching the video because for now you can remember that a dominant seventh chord is a type of major chord and then you can watch my video on seventh chords to understand more about why it's a major chord, so here's my quick little side tangent.
Well, the note that always determines whether a chord is major or minor is the third degree note, this is a very important thing, I think, for people to know, that's why I'm taking this little tangent and, in this case of this D7 chord, the third degree note is the F sharp, so you might be saying, "Hey, wait." Why is the third degree note F sharp? Technically, you know the second note in the d7 chord right d fa c that's the second note in the chord and then f sharp is the seventh note in the right g major scale so why the hell would we call this f sharp is the third degree, because if we're looking at just this chord, okay, just this D dominant seventh chord and we're not going to think about it in the context of G major anymore, so we're not in G major. world, we're just approaching this d seven dominant chord, that's all we're thinking about and analyzing, we're actually going to think about it in the context of its own root note, which is d okay, so d seven dominant, TRUE? the root note is D, so we're actually going to think of a D major scale, which is what I'm going to write down the notes of F sharp G and C sharp these are the notes in our D major scale, okay, so these are the notes that Now we're going to think about it and, as you can see, F sharp is the third note in that scale, so we'll refer to the note F sharp as the third degree of a d7 chord, and from D to F sharp , this interval distance here is a major third, makes it a major chord, well another way to think about it is that that F sharp note is part of the D major scale, it's a major chord if the chord had a third degree flattened, which means that if we took that note F sharp and flattened it, which is the same as moving it down a half step and it became the note F natural instead of F sharp, so now we were playing the D chord F natural a and c, okay so if we played these notes instead of d f sharp a and c then suddenly we would have a minor chord because d to f natural is a minor third, so it doesn't matter what kind of extensions are in the chord if the chord is d7 to d7 flat 9 sharp 11 to d minor 13 whatever the crazy chord name is, if you want to determine if the chord is major or minor, all you need to look at is that third degree note in the chord and see if it's a a major third or a minor third. from the root note, another way to think about it is if that third degree note is part of the major scale of the root note in the same way that F sharp is part of a D major scale, then it will be a major chord, it will be a major third and a major chord if the third degree note has been flattened from the major scale the way we convert F sharp to F natural because we flattened it, then it will be a minor chord or a minor third, okay, no more of this , I feel like I'm opening another can of worms that we just don't need to go down right now because that's not really what this video is about and otherwise if I went down every rabbit hole my videos would be hours and hours long. long, so if you're still confused, don't be afraid, I promise if you go through it a little slower, watch my other video if you want to go through this in more detail.
I also have another whole video that's all about intervals and 7th chords that I'll also link in the description below, so there are two videos down there that you can sink your teeth into if you're still confused about all of this and then I promise you it'll stick. very clear and it will make sense to move forward, okay? So, since the d7 fifth chord is a dominant seventh chord, which is a type of major chord, we're going to write a number five in Roman capitals like this because dominant seventh chords are this type of major chord, so let's to write five in capital letters and then we're going to write a little seven next to it, cool, what's up with the sixth chord?
Will this be uppercase or lowercase? Well, tell me, since it's a minor chord, it's going to be lowercase, so let's write a lowercase 6 with a little seven next to it and last but not least, what about the seventh chord? Now this one is a little tricky too because if we were to refer to it as F sharp middle seven diminished, remember how I said we could refer to this chord by two different names. so if we refer to it as F sharp half diminished seven then it does not have the word major or minor in its name, however if we refer to it as F minor seven flat five which is the other name then you can see yes. it has the word minor on the right in f sharp minor seven five five so this is a minor chord so I'm going to write a lowercase seven and then I can also write a little half diminished symbol and then a number seven, okay.
Now that we have our Roman numeral pattern written here at the top, this is kind of like ourformula up there, okay, let me show you how easy it is to discover the name of each diatonic chord in a major key, so let's discover the diatonic pattern. F major key chords, okay, first we're going to write an F major scale, so we have f, then we have G, flat, C, D and E, okay, so these are the notes in my F scale major, now we're just going to take each of these seven notes in the scale and apply the chord qualities to them, so let me show you what I mean: the first chord is a major seven, so that means that our first diatonic chord It's just going to be F major 7. then the second chord is going to be what we know is going to be g something true because it starts with g and then seven minor right because it's a lowercase two with a seven minor seven okay, the third chord is a minor seven the fourth chord is B flat major seven the the fifth chord is C seven, the sixth chord is D minor seven and the seventh chord is E half diminished seven also known as E minor seven flat five was not that easy as you can see it always follows exactly the same pattern no matter what major key you are in the first note of the scale you will always turn it into a major seventh chord the second note of the scale you will always turn it into a minor seventh chord the third note of the scale always will become a minor seventh chord the fourth note in the scale will always become a major seventh chord the fifth note will always become a dominant seventh chord the sixth note will always become a minor seventh chord and the seventh note always becomes a half diminished seventh chord now let's try to figure out the diatonic chords of another key, how about a major so that the notes in an A major scale are a b c sharp f sharp and g sharp now before writing the chord names?
I want to point something out because it's a little confusing. I can see that these three major chords if we look at just these three major chords which are the first chord, the fourth chord and the fifth chord, two of them become major seventh chords. like here, this becomes just I'm giving you the answers, so this becomes a major seventh and on the fourth chord it becomes a D major seventh, but then the fifth chord doesn't become an E major seven, it just becomes a dominant seven. but roman numerals don't differentiate it at all, they just have a capital number with a seven, so sometimes people specify the difference between a dominant seven chord and a major seventh chord, sometimes people write it as capital m in Roman numerals like this, then they would write an m seven to indicate that it is a major seventh chord and not just a dominant seventh chord.
Okay, so you would write that for the seven one and then you would write four major sevens for the fourth chord, okay, and then you would write the fifth chord like this, just with a five and a seven, so this capital m means major, it's well, the lower case m is minor, the upper case m is major and this tells us that it is a major. seventh chord this is a four major seventh chord and then this would just be a dominant fifth seventh chord, okay you might see it written with the m, you might see it written without it, to be honest , most people generally don't write that capital mn. in which case you just have to know that the first and fourth chords are major sevenths and the fifth chord is a dominant seven, but actually that's not too difficult to memorize, I think you already know, especially once you practice this a little . a little bit and by the way, if you want to practice all of this more, I have a lot of printable practice worksheets that are available in a link in the description below, those worksheets can really help you dig in and practice everything that we're learning. these lessons, so if you want to practice what we're learning here, click on that link and check out some of those worksheets.
I know I already gave the names of those three, but let's move on, what would be the second one? The second chord would be B minor seven, what about the third chord? So we know it's C sharp, something right and it's a lowercase three, which means it's going to be minor, right, minor, seven, so we have C sharp minor seven, we've already determined that this is. D major seven this is E dominant seven or E seven the sixth chord what is that? that's going to be F sharp is a lowercase six, so it's seven minor F sharp minor seven so the seventh chord will be G sharp something G sharp half diminished seven or G sharp minor seven flat five like that cool, okay, let's do one more as an example, but like I said, if you want more practice figuring out the diatonic chords of different major keys using this method, I have practice worksheets with the answer keys for you to check, available for download at a link in the description to next, that way you can really dig into the concepts that we're learning in this video, it's homework, okay, so the last thing we're going to do is figure out diatonic chords. in the key of flat major, so first I'm going to write the notes in a flat major scale, so a flat B flat C flat E flat F and G and the chords are, so this will be a flat something well a flat is a capital letter a right major seven is okay what about the second chord? the second diatonic chord will be B flat something B flat is a lower case two right so B flat minor seven is okay what about the third chord?
We know it will be c something c is lower case three so it will be C minor right C minor seven the fourth chord will be we know it will be D flat something D flat and then it's a major or minor chord well, it's the number four in upper case, so It will be major D flat major seven, right, the fifth chord is going to be E flat something and it's going to be a dominant seven chord, so E flat seven, the sixth chord is going to be f something, we have a lower case 6, so that goes. to be F minor 7. and last but not least we have G, this will be G minor 7 flat 5 or G half diminished 7.
Look, it's actually quite simple when you see that it always follows the exact same formula and pattern. I think everything is very good. I told you that I would show you later in this video how we can begin to apply our knowledge of diatonic chords to train our ear and learn to recognize chord progressions. It's a process I like to call labeling and it's one of the reasons why it's so useful to think of chords as numbers because the relationship between these chords actually sounds the same no matter what key we're in and if we just analyze the chords as numbers so we can really listen and trace the similarities, let me show you You see what I mean, so let's take a very common chord progression that you've probably been hearing your whole life, but maybe you didn't realize you were always listening to the same chord progression because you could never put a name to it.
So let's look at a 1 6 2 5 chord progression. Okay, 1 6 4, we can write it with or without sevenths. We can also write it as two thumbs. Now I will first write down all the diatonic chords. the key of C major is okay, so we have C major seven D minor seven E minor seven F major seven G dominant seven a minor seven and b diminished seven okay, I'm also going to write the diatonic chords in the key of G major so we have G major seven to minor seven b minor seven c major 7 d 7 e minor 7 and f sharp half diminished 7. so i wrote it a little more clearly, we have the chord progression one six two five without sevenths and then with the sevenths well, so first let's write this chord progression in the key of C major so we'll look at these chords here because we're in C major so the first one is chord one as a major seventh chord so C major seven so the sixth chord is a minor seven then the second chord is D minor seven and then the fifth chord is G dominant seven cool, if we wrote this chord progression without the seventh chords just have c, then a minor, then D minor and then G, so without seventh chords and with seventh chords, okay, now let's write this chord progression in the treble clef, okay, so the treble clef we would start with the single chord is G major seven, right? then the sixth chord is E minor seven, then the second chord is a minor seven, then the fifth chord is D7, that's one, six, two, five, in the key of G major, okay, and then we could write that too without the seventh chords, we would just do it. having g e minor to minor and then d is okay, so this chord progression, the one six two five chord progression, can be found in an infinite number of songs, songs like um heart and soul, stand by me, uh, sherry, earth angel, dear future husband, uh, just to name a few, so let me show you that I'm just going to play this chord progression in the key of C over and over, but I'll sing the different songs on top of the progression of chords so you can see how it's always the same chord progression. so now I'm going to play the chord progression one, six, two, five in the key of C major and I'm going to play without the seventh chord, so just see a D minor, G, so we have C minor, D minor and g, and that's one. six two five heart and soul I fell in love because you hugged me tight and stole a kiss from me at night will you be mine?
I love you all the time I'm just a fool in love you'll also be by my side when the night is gone and the earth is also 1625. As you can see, all of these songs that I just sang had the exact same chord progression and once We start telling our ears, hey, this is what a 1625 chord progression sounds like, over time our ears will start to be able to. recognize and identify what the chord progression sounds like, so the first step is just identifying what the chord progression is, which like I said, I call it labeling, so once we label it as 1625 we can start listening to more closely and try to remember what 1625 sounds like now look at this, I'm going to play heart and soul, but I'm going to play it both in the clef of C and then in the treble clef, so you'll see how the chord progression is the same .
It sounds the same no matter what key we're in, okay, so first I'm going to play the heart and soul in the key of C and we're going to play it with the seventh chord just for fun because this one sounds good with seventh chords, like this that I'm going to play C major seven to minor seven D minor seven and then G seven okay, heart and soul, I fell in love with you and I lost control of the way one six two great, now I'm going to play it in the treble clef major, okay, that's pretty high for me to sing in the treble clef, but as you can see this chord regression works on the song no matter what key we're in, so if I play 1625 um I'll play the song no matter what key we're in, so we're transposing, we transposed it from a clef of C to the clef of treble, so it's the same song just in a different key.
This is another reason why it's useful to think about chords as numbers because when we think about chords as numbers, we can, like I said, start to recognize their relationship to each other, you know, you start to learn that, okay, 1 6 1 , this is what a 1 6 1 sounds like, right, I played c a minor c 1 6 1 and if I play 1 two one that's what a one two one sounds like or if I play one one five one it sounds like this and it doesn't matter what key it's in in that ratio it will sound the same let me play it for you in the key of g now so this is one five one in treble clef so I'm going to play g g one five one which is in maintenance g if I want to play one great so If we start thinking about chords as numbers, we can start to identify these chord progressions and try to uh train our brain to remember what they sound like and it can be as simple as just analyzing the songs that you're listening to.
I would start with very simple songs and start with simple chord progressions and see if you can recognize them and remember what they sound like because like I said, you've been hearing these chord progressions your whole life, you just haven't identified them and labeled them, so your brain You haven't been remembering what they sound like because you haven't identified them, imagine. You've been seeing colors your whole life, but you've never put a name to any of those colors until now, so it's pretty much the same concept and once you name it, you can start to remember it and recognize it when you come across it. in nature and another reason there are many reasons but I'm just going to name these two for now.
Another reason why it's so good to think of chords as numbers is because we can then transpose very easily and see how it went quite a bit. It's easy for me to transpose it from the key of C to the key of G because I know what a 1 6 2 5 chord progression is in both keys, and it's much easier for me to think of it that way than for me to sit there trying of transposing um like the root of each chord um moving up a fifth like I'm going to move c a fifth up g a up a fifth up e I mean, you could think of it that way, but for me it'seasier to go okay one six two five okay I know what that is on the cube look okay I'm going to play it in the key of g which is easier for my brain to process so um that's another one Which is why there are so many other reasons too.
But I think that's all for today. I want to do more videos later on ear training and teach you different chord progressions and practice and review how they sound so you can train your ears with me. um, if that sounds like something you'd be interested in, let me know in the comments below. um I think it would be helpful to people, but let me know if you agree and if you want to go deeper into learning music theory in general and practice what we learn in these videos that I share here, check out my patreon because I have tons of worksheets. practice work and quizzes, PDF video summaries and useful handouts that you can download and print if you support there, if you enjoyed this video please.
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