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15 - How to Make Deep Reach C Clamps All Wood only $10 Extreme Strength

15 - How to Make Deep Reach C Clamps All Wood only $10 Extreme Strength
hello everybody my name is James the reason for today's project is that I'm actually working on something else and I found out I need some

deep

reach

clamps

I went out and priced them and there are over 100 bucks for a good clamp that can

reach

about 12 inches so I decided I would

make

my own I've started here by kind of sketching out what I want on my assembly table this kind of gives me an idea of the scale and perspective and what I built ended up being just about that except I had a 12 inch

reach

now this is the perfect project for some offcuts because the widest board you need is really

only

about two and a half inches and I've got lots of walnut' off cuts but nothing in oak so I did go out and buy this one board the reason I chose red oak for this project is because red oak has an

extreme

ly high modulus of elasticity this measures the stiffness and resistance to bending which is exactly what you want in the clam there are two other unique factors that

make

oak perfect for this project the first is that it's cheap you don't have to have FAS oak you can actually get number two common and you can end up picking that up sometimes for about $2 a board foot this whole project

only

takes about three board feet the second reason and this is pretty important is that that was a study done in 2007 between fine

wood

working and Case Western Reserve University they tested different types of

wood

and six different types of glue to see what formed the...
15   how to make deep reach c clamps all wood only 10 extreme strength
strongest bond and by far the strongest bond created with the domestic

wood

was red oak with a type one PVA which is what tight bond three is it had more than double the breaking

strength

of many other combinations so needless to say I was going to be expecting a lot from these

clamps

and if you wait to the end you might be surprised I test them with a scale on video and the results are pretty neat okay back to what I'm doing so far I have ripped all the

wood

in description routed together in sections of three and here I'm about to try to plane and joint everything square you can start with four quarter stocks which is about three quarters of an inch thick then rip it down to width with the equivalent of about three times the thickness and just square it up after that I'm just going to cut everything something this is kind of a behind-the-scenes look at a new crosscut sled that I am making it will have features that no other crosscut sled does and you want to pay close attention to this no hands death zone you want to stay away from that I'm using finger joints here to hold the

clamps

together and I've got a little stock that's mounted to my outfeed table since that saw blades so high I want to

make

sure I'm not going to cut through the back obviously with such a tall pedes you're going to want to square it each time before you clamp it up you want those cuts to be nice and perpendicular and there's a preview of the two backs cut I am...
15   how to make deep reach c clamps all wood only 10 extreme strength
making two

clamps

so that is one for each clamp since I want these to fit very precisely I'm going to go ahead and do a sample on a piece of 2x4 and kind of test fit those together to

make

sure everything's perfect okay this actually looks perfect and I'm satisfied with that so I'm going to go ahead and cut the oak now to match it marking the hole locations that I can tap the threads for the

wood

en screw just

make

sure you clamp this down tight before you try cutting those threads and it really helps if you put some lubrication in there basically the best thing that I found to use is tung oil it's very viscous so it doesn't tend to run and drip very much and it really

make

s the threads cut very nicely using a really big dowel for the

wood

en threads I'm actually going to cut the threads on that too you could turn the dowel on a lathe I got lazy and I went ahead and spent ten bucks and bought a three-foot long dowel at the store when I was editing this video I could have swore it looked like that thing was going in crooked but it really is going in straight if you haven't tapped threads before but you have worked with oak you might think Oh Giz a bad

wood

for this but oak actually cuts really really well for threads you can look in here and you can see that there's not a single tear out it's a perfectly clean cut thread for the dowel however you're really kind of to soak it overnight with oil seems I always try without it and I...
15   how to make deep reach c clamps all wood only 10 extreme strength
always get some tear out when I soak it overnight and oil it works great and that first two inches there is Ted out because yesterday I was too lazy to soak in oil and I thought I'd go ahead and try it and sure enough it chunked out you can see the rest of it is cutting cleanly though this is sped up at three speed by the way and here is regular speed so you can expect to invest a little bit of time to cut this I think it probably took me 15 minutes maybe 20 minutes to cut through the whole three feet of dowel once I got to a certain point I flipped the dowel around I wrapped a towel around it so that I could clamp it down put about three or four

clamps

on it and I'm just finishing up tapping that side quick test to

make

sure that it works out since I don't want a glue failure I am going to feed copious amounts of glue into this joint there I think that is just about the right amount of glue yep I put this squeeze clamp on reverse so that that doesn't close in while I'm putting pressure on the main one okay we have to pack these wounds with massive amounts of sawdust to prevent hemorrhaging okay maybe I was kidding there but this actually has a really good function every so often you have these joints that don't quite fit together perfectly or at least you see little hairline gaps in them if you do this now before you clamp it down any little gap that you might have had will be 100% invisible when your joint is complete try it and you'll see dang...
it more glue is getting out I had no idea it takes so many

clamps

just to build a clamp kind of

make

s you wonder how the first clamp was made okay it's all dry and that looks like a nightmare to stand it is a lock hard but I'm going to tell you a secret so many people are afraid to go aggressive on their sand people when they start don't be just keep a light touch let's start with a very aggressive paper this will take off a massive amount of material in a short period of time I am using 36 grit paper on my belt sander in a minute I'm going to switch to my disc sander and I'm going to start with 60 grit on that it's going to clean up all the marks in just a couple of minutes from the belt sander and then I'll switch to 100 then 150 then 220 this entire clamp can literally be standing in about five or six minutes if you go this route by starting very aggressive try to keep an eye on some of those finger joints as we go you'll notice that there are no gaps in them not even a hairline gap using that sawdust really

make

s a difference so I had a 36-inch Dell luckily these

clamps

needed an 18 inch dowel and it worked out perfectly I get two of the members just putting a little bevel and right at the edge of the dowel where it's going to enter the

wood

I could use the disk sander but I was too lazy to pull the sander out this is that scrap long that I was talking about I'm going to use this to

make

the turning handle in order to tighten...
my clamp down mostly I just like drawing shapes on

wood

I'm going to put a hole in each handle so that I can thread them down on to the top of the screw walnut threads nicely - and this is a one and a half inch tap by the way I used one and a half inch dowels see more drawing you can use the bandsaw to cut out the handles or a coping saw works nice to even a jigsaw anything will work for that for the first five years I did

wood

working I couldn't afford a bandsaw then for the next ideas

wood

working ideas ah so I got really really good with my jigsaw you hopefully you can kind of see the shape of what that handle is coming to be now and that's why I had to do all that drawing of course here's a 3/8 inch radius round over here it did the handle a really nice rounded feel and

make

s it easier to grip and you certainly don't need a router table this is a perfect job for a palm router I have one that I bought from Home Depot it's a rigid palm routers its quarter inch shank and it works great I think I paid about ninety bucks for it okay so I'm going to attach the handle to the end of the screw with glue it fits fairly snug anyway but I'm going to put glue on both the handle and the and the screw thread itself I didn't do it here but it would have been a good idea to a participant a little bit of sawdust in with that glue that way when you thread this handle on it fits just a little bit tighter it's not really super critical I'm actually...
going to drill all the way through here with a 5/16 inch hole and I'm going to put a double pin all the way through I didn't let the glue dry before I drilled it and so the glue has been burnt on the end of my drill bit there but it did clean off nicely and remember the best course of action is when you're done putting glue just put a little bit more glue and then beat that dowel in with your giant lignum vitae Thor's hammer I thought I'd go ahead and round the edges here a little bit which I was going around the back so they decided not to set it want to compromise any

strength

there but rounding at the very front here isn't going to take away from the

strength

and it

make

s it look a little bit nicer okay this is the last time I'm going to draw on the

wood

I think three dowel pins going all the way through these finger joints will really stiffen it up quite a bit and we're not going to rely a hundred percent on glue even though I think it is sufficient this is going to give us a little bit of mechanical holding ability as well and it allows me to give a nice design feature I can use a walnut dowel for some contrasting color and I decided recently this round over to the whole piece here's that little palm router that I was talking about I had to use that in order to get this part of the clamp routed so I'm going to cut out some walnut discs for the clamping pads walnut is a good

wood

for this because it's not too hard it's not...
nearly as hard as red oak or maple and you don't want anything that's too hard to be a clamping surface it's going to go against your

wood

and potentially dent it with these hole saws I like to drill a little bit over halfway turn it over just relocate my hole and drill the other half then pull it out it's always a lot easier to get the discs out that way and for a couple of these I have to put some holes all the way through them they're going to fit over the end of the

wood

en screw as you'll see here in just a minute so I've gotta put a slot in the end of the

wood

en screw it's going to be a point where the the clamping pad can kind of hang on to and spin freely when the screw gets screwed down into the object that you're clamping you can't have the screw shaft turning against it's going to Mar the

wood

so it has to be sort of independent with the clamping pad and you'll see how I put that together so it's pretty easy to

make

this cut on the table saw we just set up the distance that we want I've set my kerf here I do one cut move the fence over about an eighth of an inch to do the second cut and then I get a quarter inch wide total width and it's easy to do that as long as the handle is not attached to this screw unfortunately I was at dummy and I went ahead and put the handle on the other screw already so I have to come up with a different method to cut the slot on my other screw so I had to move over to my really...
old router table because that's the

only

table that I had in it that would have carry a quarter inch shank bit for some reason my my newer router table so I can't put a quarter inch shank bit anyway quarter inch shank for a quarter inch putter raised up to the right depth and it's basically hovered over the position and rotated the screw sir and that did a good job as well I imagine there's some other ways this could be pet if you're a crafty

wood

worker and you can probably come up with a number so I've got to glue these disks together and they little bit rough on some of the surfaces since it was scrap

wood

so I just wanted to touch them up on my disc sander to

make

sure they're all perfectly flat so they'll glue together nicely if you do this be really careful hold it hold it tightly or maybe just play it safe and stand them in the sanding block and here I just need to glue the flat disc to the ring weights

make

fantastic

clamps

for things like this I've got this solid block of steel here it probably weighs ten pounds it's going to work for one of them well for the other one all I have is a block of aluminum a tiny little block of steel and a little piece of copper so hopefully that will do so I need to sand down the end of the screw here so it will fit inside of the clamping pad but we don't want to stand too much we want to leave the shoulder there so when the clamping pads all built around it it has something to hang on...
to so the clamping pad doesn't fall off I'm going to use a very thin slice of oak in order to

make

a little disc to hold the clamping pad onto that shoulder dang it more drawing on

wood

sorry got to

make

the whole size here so that fits down nicely into that groove that we fed them to the

wood

en screw but not so big that will fall over that shoulder I'm making three because I'm sure I'm going to screw one up so if you don't have a bandsaw I would not use the jig saw here coping sighs much better jigsaw is really too violent for this little 1/8 of an inch thick piece of

wood

okay time to put it all together this is the secret assembly method don't tell anybody how this works while I actually do is just snap that little piece of oak in half right along the grain because it will glue back together perfectly and you'll never notice the break we're going to glue it back together and go to the walnut at the same time all in place this is basically going to hold the clamping pad permanently on to the screw so I'm going to kind of hold it in place and put some pressure on it for a good half minute to a minute and that will allow the glue to bond enough where it can just sit and hang on its own and then I can use some tape as a clamp to kind of tape it together I did cut that oak disc just a little bit bigger than the walnut itself that way I can sand it down to be flush with the walnut when it's all said and done and this actually has a...
considerable amount of

strength

it takes quite a bit of force or will take quite a bit of force even to pry this off if it ever gets damaged because there's a lot of glue surface area that oak is glued to the walnut all the way around and are under normal use it will never incur loading in that direction all the loading will basically be the screw pushing straight down onto the flat 3/4 inch thick part of the walnut against our clamping surface and we can see how it's going to spin freely in place I'll allow the screw to turn and it will stay put I thought I would

make

this up with a another clamping pad at the bottom also with walnut just for looks really and here you get to see me using this clamp for the very first time it's going to actually clamp that pad down in place for me so we're standing this up and if you made it this far you got to stay tuned I'm going to test this clamp on a scale here in just about three more minutes so my favorite finished is lacquer it's very easy if you have a small project like this you can buy lacquer in a spray can the nozzles for this are great one thing never to forget you must wear a respirator if you're using lacquer it's very dangerous to not use a respirator okay it's time so I have a scale the biggest scale that I could find is this one it's a five hundred and fifty pound scale we'll see how it goes I know Matthias Wandel I don't know if you follow him on YouTube he built a...
sort of a c-clamp a

deep

reach

C clamp and I think he tested his up to about 200 pounds so we'll see what we can get out of this so I'm going to use one of these

clamps

to hold the other one firmly in place I think I'll put down a piece of ply

wood

first that way all four legs from the scale can touch it and then I'm going to put a piece of ply

wood

on top of that to distribute the load so that clamp doesn't punch a hole through the scale not that it could but just in case and here we go I'm going to have two cameras running one is going to be focusing on the readout and the other one we're just going to hold by hand okay yeah so we're very excited the scale went to 564 pounds and then went to error and you can see I've got a square on the clamp there on the backside there was no deflection on the inside I've got a little bit less than 1/8 and that's about 2/3 of the distance to the screw so that's pretty good after releasing the pressure I'm just going to check and

make

sure and it does look like the clamp has returned to perfectly square so that's fantastic so we're very excited the results are great because sort of what I expected in reality you know a little bit of science and research went into this giving the

wood

with the highest

strength

and the best glue bond that we could in fact I have a feeling this clamp could probably clamp a thousand pounds of pressure so if you're out there ever watching my video...
Matthias I'm ready for a clamp challenge thank you very much for watching and please subscribe you