YTread Logo
YTread Logo

Wie man eine Küche aus Massivholz baut | SWR Handwerkskunst

Wie man eine Küche aus Massivholz baut | SWR Handwerkskunst
A colossus made of wood is being built in the T2 carpentry workshop in Hahnheim, Rhine-Hesse . With a weight of one ton and around 250 components. A kitchen, solid and yet elegant, with great attention to detail. (Blowing) Many different work steps are required for such a kitchen from the carpenter . This requires patience, precision and, above all, passion. If you look at the trunk of the tree and you can count the years, you see, okay, this tree, it was maybe 100 years old, and then it's quite awe -inspiring when you see it in front of you and know, okay, I'll process it into one hopefully long-lasting piece of furniture. The starting material are these oak planks. They should later give the kitchen its very own character. It's a closet, just with revolving doors. All visible components solid. The usual. Several days are needed to measure and plan the kitchen. The young master carpenter Marvin Ufermann took over. He builds the kitchen together with his boss Arnulf Schmittlein. It's just a top performance that is delivered here by a colleague. That's not always easy. Sometimes you need good nerves. While Marvin takes care of the planning and later interior design, Arnulf is the specialist for the raw material. It's just good, let's say, putting the wood together, you can already see in your mind's eye how it's supposed to be when you look at the planks here . Arnulf will build the visible sides and door fronts of the kitchen from these...
wie man eine k che aus massivholz baut swr handwerkskunst
solid oak planks . Something to create, which should result in the most beautiful picture possible afterwards. And doing all these work steps is a lot of fun for me. That's my domain, I've been doing it for 40 years. First, the 35-kilo planks have to be roughly cut to size. The carpenters try to make all the visible sides of the kitchen from just two logs so that the end result is as homogeneous as possible. (Machine noise in the background) Sodele, with the oak we now have the special feature that we have a so-called sapwood on the outside, which differs both in color and in terms of the quality of the wood is somewhat inferior because it is much softer. This means that we have to cut away a relatively large amount of the edge, from the bark of the oak, so that we can get to the heart of the wood. As a result, the waste is slightly higher than with other types of wood. (Loud whirring) This first cut is called a trim cut. Woodworm also likes to settle in the sapwood. The core of the oak is often cracked and comes off as well. The carpenters have to buy about twice the amount of raw material for oak wood in order to get enough good wood for the kitchen. When the sapwood is gone, Arnulf saws the plank into bars. (Loud machine noise) He has to straighten the crooked wood with the surface planer. He also relies on his hearing. If the sound is even, it has picked up enough material. (Loud whirring) Arnulf Schmittlein founded the joinery T2 together with two friends almost...
wie man eine k che aus massivholz baut swr handwerkskunst
40 years ago. Sustainability has always been important to him. I have a great deal of respect for this basic material that we work with, because it has stood on earth for 80 to 100 years. And it would be a shame not to make anything worthwhile out of it somehow. And that means that the basic idea is actually to create timeless furniture that people like as long as possible, that really retain their value and that really do something to counteract the throwaway society that is increasingly falling on our feet . (Loud whirring) The bars are now being planed to the correct thickness and width on the four-sided planing machine. Thanks to the straightened joining edges, the wood fits perfectly and comes out at a right angle at the back. (Loud whirring) Arnulf's trained eye comes into play. It's sort of a bit ahead of time now. Plain, semi-plain, so transitional and relatively strong. So horizontal annual rings with a strong grain. The so-called mirrors form when annual rings are stationary. In addition, the course also has an influence on the composition of the fronts. There is a right side and a left side of the wood. The right side faces the core, the left side faces the bark. And if you now look at what we have here in the middle, four boards with lying, relatively lying growth rings, it makes sense to turn the right side and then the left side onto the visible surface so that the wood deforms mutually cancels? And that's why we have the annual rings running here in...
wie man eine k che aus massivholz baut swr handwerkskunst
such a way that we have the right side of the wood at the top here and the opposite path here, the annual rings run the other way around. Then I have the top left again and this allows me to balance out the tension. Then at the end we look again at the optics to see if you like it and approve it with the carpenter's triangle. bang! This ultimately becomes the front of a tall cabinet. Arnulf needs around 70 different solid wood components for large and small door fronts and visible sides for this kitchen. The door fronts are processed further. The lengths have to be adjusted for this. (Loud sawing noises) Solid wood is alive and works for a lifetime. The carpenters try to cushion this circumstance with an appropriate construction. That's why there are now holes in the boards. Stainless steel rods are glued into them. They give stability and prevent the doors from warping over the years. All of this takes time and dedication. An important difference to industrial goods. (rattling) That's going up the pace. Nobody pays attention to the fiber flow, to the course of the annual rings and accordingly the result is the end result of these products. Well, it's nicer if you do it yourself. (Clacking) With oak wood, carpenters are only allowed to use rods made of stainless steel, because the tanning acid in the wood reacts with other metals and liquids that are also in the glue. The result would be unsightly blue discolouration. (Click) The first front is done. She comes...
to the sink cabinet later. (whirring) A new day in the carpentry shop. The approximately 70 solid wood parts are glued and dried. (rustling) Marvin and Arnulf still have to calibrate the parts, i.e. grind them to their final dimensions. Glue excess and unevenness are removed on the wide belt sander. (Loud noise) If everything is to measure, master carpenter Marvin Ufermann devotes himself to the inner workings of the kitchen. He uses veneer plywood panels for this. Also known as blockboard. They have an important design advantage. We have a middle layer of softwood. It runs in one direction, then we have a cover veneer on top, a thick sawn veneer, which is glued at 90 degrees to the other layer. And this, hence the name, blocks each other, solid wood parts can always adapt to the room temperature or the ambient air humidity. In 20 years, maybe something will be warped. A door won't open or something, that can always happen and we don't have that with the material. The unwieldy plates are cut in half. Because the cut edges do not fit the kitchen, real oak strips are glued on to the visible sides . For this it goes to the edge banding machine. The two millimeter thick oak strips are attached to the edges with a hot-melt adhesive. (Machines start to hum.) The machine planes the overhang to fit, mills another curve and simply cuts off the ends. All this in a few seconds. What used to take a good two days by hand can now be done in 15 minutes. A strong, persistent scent of...
coniferous wood slowly spreads through the workshop . Hangover pesto seems to like it. Marvin cuts all parts to the exact final dimensions. Also the material for the rear panels, shelves and the solid wood panels for the later drawers. It takes him a whole day to do that. This kitchen now has 243 components here and now I first draw which components together with which components make up a body and accordingly I then know where which holes have to go. (Hiss) It goes to the line hole drill. Marvin sets drilling depth, position and reference edge. First, he drills the holes in the future body for the so-called Minifix connectors. This is the housing, which will come in here later. And as the next step, we drill the front hole for the corresponding bolt, which then goes into the counterpart, is gripped by the housing, then you can turn it and lock it. (Click) The fact that drilling takes time, Marvin often has to change over, constantly repeat work processes and always keep an overview. (whirring) Because in the end, many steps intertwine. Spatial imagination is very important, good organization, you need an overview. you need patience. You always have to stay focused. Don't lose your nerve because it's taking too long. You just have to stick with it, be patient, stay focused. Marvin can drill a hole every 32 millimeters with the machine . With the row of holes for the tall cupboards , he can quickly drill through everything. (Whirring) In principle, the row of holes...
always includes shelves, which we can then distribute accordingly on the row of holes. And now we basically drill half a hole for each shelf. This always works quite well by simply taking two shelves at the same time and then drilling in the middle between the shelves. Now you can see quite well here, now we have a nice half hole on both shelves, where our shelf support will later attach. (Machine noise) The last holes for the time being are for the top hinges of the doors. (Machine noise) Done. It's definitely a good feeling when you realize: Okay, I've done everything, it's kind of in front of me and the tour de force has been overcome, so to speak. But then of course it's fine again. It's the drawers' turn. Marvin has already drilled the dowels. The last holes are drilled in the front parts of the pillar drill. The large oak fronts are screwed into it during assembly. (rattling) (buzzing) So, in the next step we want to pull a groove into our drawer side parts here, where our drawer bottoms will then later fit in after gluing during final assembly . And we do that on the circular saw and then we get started. (Loud sawing noises) That's fine , it can go on. (Loud sawing noises) (Hissing) Finishing touches on the edge grinding machine. Marvin removes the discoloration from sawing. Even if many steps are repeated: the carpenter loves his work. I like working with wood because it is a living material. Regardless, even if I now build a kitchen that...
is fundamentally similar to the last kitchen, it will still be very different. Because I have a different tree trunk, I have a different look, maybe a little bit wilder, a little bit calmer, has a different hue. And it doesn't really matter what you do if it's the same step, it's always something different because it always has a different character. (Loud whirring) We're getting angular handles on our fronts. That's why our profile is also angular and no curves, because that would be a break in style. (Machine noise) Marvin , the 27-year-old master carpenter, discovered his love for wood at an early age. Because there was work to be done in the garden shed or something, I was always there right away, even as a little boy. I somehow hammered it or something. I've always liked doing it, but somehow I didn't pursue it at first and started studying civil engineering. I then quickly realized that it was too theoretical for me and that I could no longer see a lecture hall, so I gave up and swung around. Definitely more fun than sitting in the lecture hall. When lending the drawers, Arnulf lends a hand again. (Birds chirping) The position of the dowel holes is well thought out. Marvin placed them so that the front sections of the drawer are dowelled between the long sections. A constructive advantage. So you always pull at the front across the dowel and the glued connection cannot come loose. If you would simply plug the front parts in front of it, you...
would eventually have the drawer front in your hand. A total of 16 drawers must be created. And accuracy is required. So we're two millimeters longer in that direction, so we'll have to do it again. A wrong angle would take revenge during installation and the drawer would jam. Ok, angle is right. The next milestone has been reached. It's always a relatively extensive story of the labor intensity, but ... it's a great product at the end if everything works. Most of the time everything works. This kitchen also gets special handles. Marvin makes them out of black steel angles. (rattling) He still has to deburr the sharp edges, so go outside for that. Because wood chips and sparks don't get along. Incidentally, the name T2 comes from the early days of the joinery, because it was still in Tränkgasse two. That would also solve this secret. (Machine noise) (Something falls to the ground.) (Machine noise) (rattling) The screw heads will later sink into the attached drill holes. Now we want to work on our solid wood components a little further. We have a hot glue gun like that with a black kit in there. So we're going to go to all the knotholes and cracks and so on that we have in here and putty black on them. We do that on the one hand for visual reasons, and also to prevent dirt from getting in or something. (Birds chirping) Marvin cools the black mass with a flat iron and presses it deep into the cracks. He simply scrapes off the excess with a kind of...
chisel. (Birds chirping) ( Squeaking) (Machine noise ) Marvin looks for the right positions for the fittings of the drawer slides and door hinges. He pre-drills the holes for later installation. The exact planning of the carpenter ranges from the smallest drill hole to the big picture. We look at what the front of the body looks like and maybe somehow have a solid wood image that runs through the entire line and is ultimately divided into one piece. Then you just painted a whole picture on the kitchen. This image really comes into its own in the next step. Thanks to the solvent-free furniture oil , the character of the oak comes to the fore. The grain, which Arnulf paid attention to when putting it together, is evident. I always use the so-called cross-line method first across the grain and then again along the grain. So that I get all the spots as well as possible, so that nothing remains unoiled. Of course, we also want to have a thorough surface. As the oil soaks in, Marvin cleans the handles. The hard wax seals the surface and prevents black abrasion. The sustainability of the means also plays a role in the surface treatment in carpentry . We try as best we can to use solvent-free oils, for example, and to avoid paint if it's possible to just use a little bit more ecological means. After a good half hour , the wood has taken enough oil. What now appears to be wet and remains on it, so to speak, we have to rub off with the cloths, otherwise it will be shiny and greasy...
and also sticky. And then you can't get rid of that with cloths or something, you have to grind it. (Machine noise) Polish smooth again and then allow the oak to rest for two days. Now we have our internal body components here and we treat them with the wax shellac. And that has a very big advantage in principle. We have a fairly odorless surface agent in this case. If we were to oil it like we do with our solid wood fronts, it would take a very long time in a closed room, as we have in every carcass, for the smell of oil to evaporate over time. (Machine whirrs) The layer can only be very thin, so Marvin applies the paint with the paint gun. (hissing) (rattling) After an hour or two, the paint is dry. The surface changes. Marvin has to go again. What's happening here is that the wood fibers stand up and that makes it rough. And now we're really just going to use some fine sandpaper that we're not going to do anything more than just snip those fibers. And then in the next step we will spray it a second time with the wax shellac, then it will remain smooth and give a good surface. (Machine noise) (hissing) Soon the result of the last working days will be revealed. I really think my favorite moment is when the kitchen is assembled here in the workshop. I really like doing that, because then you can see that everything fits and you get a good deal when you have it in front of you. (rattling) (clinking) (drilling noises) You have to be a bit careful when installing...
the adjustable feet, because the positioning of the adjustable feet is also the positioning of my skirting board, i.e. as a finish to the floor. Of course we want to have an even picture so that our base doesn't hang down crookedly. (drilling noises) Now you can see if everything fits. Nervous? There is no excitement in that sense, because I always assume that I have done everything right. That's one reason we're building this, so we can see that everything is right. First of all, we are always optimistic. The assembly in the workshop takes a whole day. Nevertheless, the carpenters take their time because they can still make adjustments here. This saves a lot of time for installation at the customer. In addition, this kitchen can theoretically be dismantled and reassembled as often as you like without anything warping or tearing out. Probably unthinkable with the competition off the shelf. The precise work of the carpenters pays off. The bodies form the basic structure of the kitchen. The desired image is slowly emerging. Of course you're proud of it when there's something there afterwards that looks nice, where everything fits, where you didn't make any or just a few mistakes. Yes, in the end it's also ... the best thing about working, that people say that what we've done is great. So, sure. (Distant grinding noises) (Loud machine rattling) The lid of the small cabinets is not continuous. This saves material and therefore weight. Even so, the...
kitchen weighs around 800 kilograms and that without the granite worktop. (Laughter) That 's now being supplied by the neighboring stone mason. Nero assoluto, devil black. Pretty heavy. The three granite slabs weigh an additional 250 kilograms. Makes over a ton for the entire kitchen. A little over. The kitchen has to be aligned before the worktop can be placed on it. Marvin adjusts the height precisely using a spirit level and base adjuster. Isn't he exactly right here? Could the fronts warp during later installation on site? The picture of the kitchen would be crooked. (drilling) The line ends here and then continues here. In the elbow, so to speak. In order to get a good transition between the two legs, we need a corner bracket here, which we now mount between them. (Hammering) The pre-drilled holes will help Marvin position the hardware and the drawer slide. (Drilling noises) He still has to finish assembling the drawers. Couplings and holes for the rail guide are put into the floor. (drilling noises) In the next step we assemble our fronts. To do this, I have to measure out how much our fronts protrude from each individual drawer, so to speak, so that I know exactly where they have to be positioned. It's a little bit different for each box. That's why they have to go in first, now we'll get them out again and screw on the front. A summer storm gathers over the workshop. The rain is pattering on the tin roof of the hall. (Patterling rain) The front is...
screwed to the front part of the drawer in the holes provided. Both now form a so-called double. The hob is supposed to be in at the top later. That's why there is only one optical aperture for a homogeneous image. The doors are now missing. (Patterling rain) Marvin has to make himself small for the final touches. Special fittings such as the kidney pull-out in the corner cabinet are still missing. And the last front. The cupboard under the sink gets them. Don't worry, it will be precisely adjusted during installation. (Patterling rain) Well, so that it stays behind. Made. If it also suits your personal taste , then it makes you all the happier. If I think: "That turned out nice!", then you're happy to deliver it and take it away. A few days later. Most of the kitchen is set up at the customer's in the neighboring town. Final handles. (Machine noise) The holes for the sockets. (babble of voices) Then it will be difficult one last time. The stone slabs have to be dragged into the attic apartment. Let's both go outside. It's all ok. Yo! Marvin installs the specially made baseboards for a clean finish on the floor. They complete the face of the kitchen. (coughing) (conversation in the background) (church bells) Of course, sinks and the like shouldn't be missing either. By the way, the refrigerator will be free next to the kitchen. The wooden corner bracket has a practical purpose. Thanks to it, the door of the dishwasher also runs cleanly...
past the corner cabinet. Final check, so that everything really fits. And adjust again. The approximately 160 hours of work that went into this kitchen were worth the effort. So it was definitely worth it. I've already received feedback from the customers, who have been there from time to time, that they are happy. That alone is worth a lot that we are also satisfied, because that is our claim, we want the customers to be satisfied and if they are satisfied, we are satisfied too. Including stone slabs and installation , the kitchen from the carpenter costs 32,000 euros. Of course without devices. There is a lot of wood and a kitchen with its own character. Which not only invites you to cook, but sometimes also to dream. And really sad that she has to give up, I'm not necessarily now. But it makes you dream a little that you can install a kitchen like that yourself, because of course you never get around to it. What excited you most about this craft? Write it to us in the comments and of course we look forward to your channel subscription. SWR 2022