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Why Introspection is Key to Good Therapy | Alex Williams | TEDxKUEdwards

Jun 04, 2021
So when I was a kid, I went to the dentist. Now I've been to the dentist ever since, but this particular story took place many years ago and the dentist did a procedure on my tooth and asked me and said, "Does it feel

good

?" It was nothing but unpleasant and I ran my tongue over the tooth, but I told him you know, you don't have any kind of device that you can use to see if this feels like it's supposed to and the dentist gave me a smile and He said he didn't have any device that could tell better if the tooth was made correctly than my own subjective sense, obviously that story stayed with me and over the years I have realized that it is.
why introspection is key to good therapy alex williams tedxkuedwards
It's actually true for many things in life, things that are trivial but also things that are important. If I see you eating a chocolate bar, if you see me getting a hug, our best knowledge of what that experience is like for us comes simply from asking each other. To get myself pumped up for this ted talk I watched interviews from nature guy ric flair, if all you did was measure my physiology when you heard him say whoa you wouldn't know if I'm excited or scared maybe it was a little of both . You would have to know by asking me even now as you listen to the words that come out of my mouth listening to me speak.
why introspection is key to good therapy alex williams tedxkuedwards

More Interesting Facts About,

why introspection is key to good therapy alex williams tedxkuedwards...

I'm changing your brain and you're doing the same to me knowing there's an audience for this Ted Talk. you're changing my brain, but there's no brain imaging device in the world that can compare to our own introspective responses to what this experience is like, so introspective responses are usually our most accurate responses, but is that true for psycho

therapy

? So let's imagine that Denise Denise is a 38-year-old black American woman and with the pandemic she has been in a bad mood, she doesn't enjoy the things she used to do, even when she interacts with her family, she feels more tired than before and she simply doesn't have the energy anymore.
why introspection is key to good therapy alex williams tedxkuedwards
Same kind of energy levels Denise decides she wants to go to a therapist, but wonders if

therapy

will work if she's listened to people like me. I am a licensed psychologist. If you've heard people like us talk nonsense before, you probably heard us say things about how therapy and psychology are based on rigorous empirical science and that's true. There is a lot of research that shows that therapy works and helps people with mental health problems, especially compared to doing nothing about it. There is a separate body of research. That seems to show that some therapies work better than others for treating certain mental health problems.
why introspection is key to good therapy alex williams tedxkuedwards
We call these evidence-based psychotherapies, so there are more than 600 brands of psychotherapy, but only about 80 are designated with the evidence-based label by the clinical society. psychology, which is a division of the American Psychological Association, the Society of Clinical Psychology makes this list publicly available and very transparently provides the evidence, the research citations that they believe are key to saying that these therapies are based in evidence and work better than others. to treat certain psychological problems, so if Denise goes to a therapist and the therapist talks to Denise and it turns out that Denise has clinical depression, the therapist may suggest that they use evidence-based psychotherapy to treat that depression, such as interpersonal or cognitive therapy behavioral. therapy can then deny having faith that it works we really need

introspection

to know if it works the evidence says it works well maybe things that were not so clear in the last decade psychologists had to deal with the realization that many of our Los Most prized research findings are not as pristine as we thought.
It started about a decade ago. Some psychologists seemed to know this before, but to many of us it seemed like a decade ago. There was a famous psychologist who published a study in a highly reputable psychological journal that seemed to show that current events could influence the outcomes of past events, events could influence the outcome of past events, that's like saying that if patrick mahomes were playing tonight and he threw for a touchdown, that would affect whether Kansas City would win the football game. game last Sunday that that doesn't pass the sniff test, that doesn't really make sense and you know, psychologists were surprised by this and many psychologists tried to replicate the findings, that is, they performed similar experiments to see if they could get similar results.
You probably won't be surprised to find out that they couldn't, no one could, so what happened here, that raised the question, how did this psychologist publish these results? fraud, so what happened well by looking at their research methods and then starting to look at other famous studies in psychology, psychologists are starting to realize something that has also been done in other disciplines in physical health care, in biology, in economics and in political science, that research designs often lend themselves to false positive results, which are often created by researchers to suggest that phenomena exist when in fact they do not exist.
I'm a psychologist, so I'm choosing our field here, but this was surprising. Psychologists begin to do large-scale replications of much earlier psychological research and found that only about half of the psychological studies they attempted to replicate were replicated when they followed similar experimental procedures, they did not get similar results half of the time to try to discover the scope of this problem, psychologists also began to look at past bodies of research and analyzed them statistically to see if there were statistical problems with the credibility of past research findings. That's where my colleagues and I get interested.
We want to know, for the evidence-based psychotherapy literature, how credible it is. is that literature, so we conducted meta-scientific reviews, statistical reviews of the credibility of previous bodies of psychological research on evidence-based psychotherapies, the most notable of which, we finally published in the journal of abnormal psychology those 80 therapies of society of clinical psychology designated as Evidence-Based, we examine the research cited to support that evidence-based designation. Collectively, we analyzed more than 450 research reports across a variety of statistical metrics, so, for example, we looked at how large the samples were in these studies overall, the more participants in a therapy trial, the more We could trust the results, we also looked at things like statistical misinformation.
So if a given study said that 2 plus 2 equals 7, we knew there was something wrong with at least one of those numbers together, our findings were quite revealing, about 20 percent of evidence-based psychotherapies had a performed well on most of our metrics, meaning they had strong evidence of credibility, about 30 percent were a mixed bag, they did well on some metrics and not so well on others. You have to study math to realize that that leaves fifty percent fifty percent one in two of the evidence-based psychotherapies we analyzed performed poorly on most of our metrics, calling into question the credibility of the evidence cited. for them as evidence -based, then all hope is lost here are the Denises of the world receiving therapy or any of us who are interested in therapy, doing therapy for ourselves, thinking about doing therapy in the future, we are screwed, fortunately , we are not in the investigation at all.
What my colleagues and I did has no relation to that large body of research showing that therapy works for people who seek it. We simply look at whether there is credible evidence that some therapies work better than others, that is different from whether or not no therapy doesn't work at all it does, secondly, psychologists are taking advantage of this moment, some have called it a replication crisis because of those replication failures. I prefer the term credibility movement and that's what many psychologists use to describe this, we are being proactive. That's why many therapy trials and other types of studies being done now are trying to fix and use different, better research designs that significantly decrease the likelihood of having false positive results, which is

good

for future genesis, but What about the current illness?
Those of us who are doing therapy in therapy now, what can we do? Introspection could be our saving grace. Kind of like at the dentist's office. There is often no better measure of how therapy is going than simply asking the patient or client what they think about it. It can be done informally, the therapist and the patient sit together and talk about it, week by week or every two weeks, if the patient's symptoms are decreasing, if they are reaching their goals, introspective monitoring can also be done, but more formally, there is a simple pencil and paper.
Measures that clients can complete in a therapy session, often in less than two minutes, that can help track their symptoms over time, those measures ask them to reflect on how they are doing and help quantify it in some way. way so that we can see over time, your symptoms are improving, you are reaching your goals in therapy, if you are someone who is receiving therapy or you know that you are thinking about therapy and you want to make sure that

introspection

is being used well, what can do? Ask your therapist two questions: how will we know the therapy is working and what will we do if it's not a good answer.
It won't just be the therapist saying: I'll tell you these things. a good answer will involve the Denises of the world. involves any of us doing introspection and reflection, these introspections and reflections are tracked in some way over time and the therapist and patient decide together the directions they want the therapy to take and decide together if it is working, that's what that can help Denise, that's what can help everyone. We are all interested in therapy and it can also help us at the dentist's office.

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