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Why don't we all just use Geothermal Energy?

Jun 14, 2021
so here is our planet as most of us are used to seeing it not spinning next to me on my desk obviously you get what i mean what we don't see that often is what goes on inside the planet in the time we all live in. On the outside is this little crust, and although it may be 40 kilometers deep in some places, it's barely noticeable in the grand scheme of things beneath the crust, there's almost 3,000 kilometers of mantle it is composed of silica rock and minerals. It's still a solid layer, but it's very hot. The bit

just

below the crust can get almost 900 degrees Celsius and the deeper you go the harder it gets until it's over 2000 degrees Celsius down here, then you have another 2,200 kilometers of exterior. core composed mostly of molten iron between 3000 and 3800 degrees celsius and right in the middle is this solid iron core that is hotter than the surface of the sun at 6000 degrees c and why is it solid when it is at a temperature that is much higher than the melting point of iron, its pressure in it, there's so much pressure from the layers around it that the molecules in the core literally have no room to move in any liquid way, so they stay firmly squeezed together like a solid anyway I digress the point is there is a lot of heat

energy

captured within our planet it has been there for billions of years and most likely will be there for a few billion more and that heat also reaches our thin 40 kilometers of crust. the piece we stand on is the same temperature as the air around us, but it gets hotter and hotter as you go deeper until you reach the base of the crust, which is at the same temperature as the mantle, touches almost 900 degrees Celsius so there is a lot of heat available

just

below the entire surface of the planet so what we all know is

geothermal

energy

and theoretically we should be able to harness it to provide a virtually unlimited supply of heat and power for all the planet. planet with almost zero carbon dioxide emissions, so why haven't we?
why don t we all just use geothermal energy
So hello, welcome to the thought that the golden model of

geothermal

energy is of course Iceland, they are very far north only about 250 kilometers from the arctic circle with typical air temperatures that are often just above the point freezing cold and yet get much of their electricity and heat from geothermal energy, so how come Iceland has been so successful compared to most other parts of the world? Well, that thin crust I mentioned earlier is broken up into tectonic plates that can move more or less independently of each other. Anyone who lives on a fault line will know what it's like when two adjoining plates push against each other until something triggers. an earthquake two plates are actually slowly pulling apart and that allows large amounts of heat from the mantle below to escape to the upper regions of the crust beneath the landmass of iceland most parts of the earth's crust are warmed by about 35 degrees celsius for every kilometer you descend, but if you go down a kilometer below iceland you reach temperatures of about 200 degrees celsius which feeds the famous Icelandic volcanoes and steaming geysers and also provides geothermal heat very close to the surface that can be harnessed so easily that iceland really has more than it needs they have built themselves seven geothermal power stations to generate electricity from underground energy still do so by driving a turbine to spin an electrical generator just like a traditional fossil fuel or nuclear power plant, but they don't need to burn coal or gas or shoot neutrons in radioactive material to provide the heat to turn the water into steam to turn the turbine they use a fairly simple system called flash steam a well about three kilometers deep is drilled and cold water is sent down, the water becomes super he ated by geothermal temperatures and expands into steam which then rushes back out the other side to drive the turbine, not dependent on weather conditions, always on so can be used for consistent, predictable baseload power and produces negligible co2 emissions all that cheap electricity has allowed iceland to develop a p thriving aluminum industry which now accounts for around 40 per cent of the island's exports making iceland one of the richest nations in europe also pumps geothermally heated water throughout the island in a network of pipes to provide district heating for homes and businesses and greenhouses that supply a rich variety of healthy foods to the population have so much extra hot water that they can afford to heat outdoor swimming pools year-round and even pump some of it out to freeze lakes to keep parts warm enough for the Fish survive through the coldest winter months, but on a global scale geothermal power only accounts for about one percent of total electricity capacity, so why aren't we embracing this seemingly inexhaustible carbon-free natural resource with more enthusiasm?
why don t we all just use geothermal energy

More Interesting Facts About,

why don t we all just use geothermal energy...

Well, the answer is that some countries look for it, but most of them are located on or near fault lines where tectonic plates collide with each other. Of the 20 or so countries currently generating geothermal power, the United States is the largest producing geothermal energy. about 2.5 gigawatts in 2019 with 725 megawatts coming from the world's largest geothermal plant in the geysers located in the mayakamas mountains about 30 miles north of santa rosa in california, then comes indonesia, philippines, turkey, new zealand, mexico , kenya, italy and japan in 2018, the international energy agency forecast growth of up to 4.5 gigawatts in geothermal power production in the five years from then to 2023, which has equated to growth of about five percent. percent per year, but in their latest monitoring report released in June 2020, they found that growth has only been around three percent. nt per year and that geothermal energy is not currently on track to achieve the sustainable development scenario or SDS that the IEA published as an outline of how to comply with the United Nations energy-related components.
why don t we all just use geothermal energy
Sustainable Development Goals To help meet those goals along with other renewables like wind, solar and hydropower, the IEA says geothermal power production should grow by more than 10 per year between now and 2030, but to reach that goal , geothermal energy must be embraced on a truly global basis which means finding ways to harness our planet's energy in all the other countries in the world that are not lucky enough to be located above fault lines a system called binary energy is an alternative to the more traditional flash steam system in a binary system hot water from a natural underground aquifer is pumped into a heat exchanger where it gives up its heat to a secondary fluid that has a much lower boiling point, the secondary fluid then is converted to steam to drive the turbine, the beauty of this system is that it only needs the water to be at about 100 degrees Celsius so theoretically you don't need to drill as deep to get to the right temperature and that makes it a system that could be used by many countries regardless of location but still needs to get to the water hot no matter how deep and you still need to make sure the supply doesn't run out and that brings us to the increasingly contentious topic of enhanced geothermal systems or for example the us office of energy efficiency and renewable energy offers In this perfectly refined explanation of how EGS works, the EGS concept is to extract heat by creating a subsurface fracture system to which water can be added via injection wells.
why don t we all just use geothermal energy
Creating an upgraded or engineered geothermal system requires enhancing the natural permeability of rock which reminds you of anything a bi sounds like. It's not like fracking, is it? And while the fluid injected into the fractures is just water and not the nasty mix of chemicals and abrasives that are pushed down fracking lines, and while it's a much lower pressure than hydraulic fracking, it's still designed to open up fractures in rock. natural resources to create underground water reservoirs and there are many geologists and geophysicists who think that increases the risk of earthquakes in those areas, for example, it has been linked to a magnitude 5.5 earthquake in Pohang South Korea in 2017 that caused $75 million damage states in an interview for this 2020 article on the yale climate connections website john olly cavan, a research physicist with the united states geological survey, explained that these faults will eventually slip, but egs can certainly accelerate the clock but of course all other environmental issues The climate and energy security benefits of geothermal energy mica are extremely convincing according to this 2017 study.
The ves in the upper 10 kilometers of the earth's crust are about 1.3 times 10 to 27 joules, which probably means as little to you as it does to me, but the study says those reserves could supply all our global energy needs for approximately 217 million years. So the motivation to install these EGS systems around the world is very high, as Pettit Geothermal Resources Council Director says you can put a power plant anywhere effectively, all you have to do is to drill deep enough and you'll find hot rock, so maybe with the right regulations in place we'd still have a viable solution, very well possibly, but even if that were the case there are some pretty big technical and economic hurdles left in the way. of geothermal progress.
Drilling is very expensive and there is no guarantee of success when the pressurized water starts being pumped, you may not open enough decent fractures to make the project economically viable, in which case you will have wasted a great deal of time and money trying to sell that concept an investor pitch presentation and you will find your audience shrinks pretty quickly there are also minerals like quartz and limestone in the rock formations that are already saturated in existing aquifers and can also contaminate new water being pumped into this type of minerals can cause scaling and fouling that can lead to failure of components such as pumps and heat exchangers and cause costly delays that again affect the economic viability of a project, as prices for solar panels and energy storage have soared. slumped over the past decade, large corporate investors s e have been much more inclined to invest their money in that technology and in wind, however, at the cop21 climate conference in paris in 2015, the iea's sister organization, the international renewable energy agency or irena, played a role instrumental in the formation of the global geothermal alliance or gga gga is a coalition for action to increase the use of ge geothermal energy in both power generation and direct heat use.
I call on governments, businesses and other stakeholders to support investment in the potential of geothermal energy. The goal is to quintuple the installed capacity for geothermal power generation and more than double for geothermal heating by 2030. There are currently 46 member states and the alliance aims to support those countries with four priority actions to identify and map the resources geothermal around the world. promote the role of geothermal in supporting decarbonization and the implementation of national climate plans, like all other sources of renewable energy, geothermal energy will be an important element of many of the nationally determined contributions that nations Participants are due to present at COP26 by the end of 2021 if the security of the systems can be adequately a If it is assessed and regulated and some of the technical challenges can be overcome then perhaps this ancient power source that was first harnessed by the Romans in your hot tubs could become a major player in our 21st century transition to a more sustainable and carbon neutral future, that's all.
A week before I leave, I just want to let you know about an initiative called the Google.org Impact Challenge on Climate. It is a €10 million fund to support bold ideas that aim to use technology to accelerate Europe's progress towards a greener and more resilient future. Selected organizations. can receive up to 2 million euros in funding and possible personalized post-grant support from the google accelerator for startups forhelp bring their ideas to life are looking for ideas that address topics such as increased access to our use of renewable energy decarbonization of transportation improvements to air quality planning and protection of natural resources and the circular economy and design applications they are open n Now but the closing date is November 6th so if you have a brilliant idea that needs some funding head over to the address below for entry criteria and I'll leave a link where it can be done Click on the description box below.
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