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Why Do People Hate Jazz?

Jun 01, 2021
Hello everyone, I'm not sure if this is working correctly, if so, if you can hear me, give me a comment here. My title just disappeared. My app crashed and creaked. What's happening? Listen to me carefully and delete my title. My video today. I don't know you don't see it here it just looks like it's a blank video it's why

people

hate

jazz

anyway welcome to ok only some like

jazz

ok so you guys notice you see the title there, ok, great, perfect. man there's a lot of

people

here let people

hate

jazz because it shows its limitations this is going to be a long video let me talk cheers yeah everyone tell me where you're from too by the way hard rock fans hate the jazz, not me.
why do people hate jazz
I don't know if that's necessarily true, it's interesting, but welcome to all the new people who subscribed, they had some really big videos in the last two weeks and they got thousands and thousands of new subscribers, so welcome to all the new people who just subscribed, it's Labor Day here in Atlanta and I'm working here, I'm not actually working, so welcome to all of you new people here and the jazz is great. I'm trying to see all these comments. it comes so fast it's really crazy fusion rules so I did a clinic with Victor Wooten over the weekend his Wooten forests in his Wooten forests beautiful beautiful 150 acres I'm not sure what you would call it he actually has something like that. a compound, I mean, it's amazing and I got here to play with Stanley Jordan.
why do people hate jazz

More Interesting Facts About,

why do people hate jazz...

I don't know any of you. If you're familiar with Stanley Jordan, I just played with Aaron Stanley Jordan. I had never heard of him before. Stanley is a phenomenal guitarist. He was really big on 80's jazz musician. I got to hear Danny Gottlieb. Oopall, he was the drummer in Pat Metheny's initial band from '77 to '83. Amazing drummer and Victor and his brother Joe were there and it was really cool and we talked. I mentioned this topic at dinner, I was sitting there with Victor and Bob Franceschi and this is one of my favorite topics to talk about and oh, we'll talk about Walter Becker up to here anyway, it's really interesting. to hear the opinions of people who are professional jazz musicians to hear their opinion on the matter.
why do people hate jazz
I did some research here before this. I would like to talk about these statistics before that. I think I think they're really relevant to this. So I looked up how many jazz records have gone gold and platinum in the sense of the beginning of jazz and there have been nine platinum records. Platinum is a million records sold or selling millions of records. There have been 34 albums that have gone gold or platinum in the history of blue-type jazz. It is the best-selling jazz album of all time. It came out in 1959. It went four times platinum. I think in 2004, okay, then it is a multi-platinum album.
why do people hate jazz
Four million. of copies number two is Vince Guaraldi is Charlie Brown Christmas by Vince Guaraldi, which is three times platinum and came out in 1965. Herbie Hancock headhunters. I think his was the next record that came out in 73. It went platinum in 1986. Then the Severe Weather Report came out in 77. It was certified platinum. in 1991, I remember it would be a really big record at the time, a future shock for Herbie Hancock, which is not really a jazz record, but we'll put it in that category that came out in 1983. Dave Brubeck time out came out in 1959 and that is a plate that was a gold record or is a platinum record Sorry, Ken Burns' jazz compilation is professional platinum Louie Armstrong, The Wonderful Life is a compilation from 1988, so that's two, two compilations made there and then by Miles, came out in 1970 and went platinum. in 2003, those are all those are the nine platinum releases, of which there are 25 gold records from those 25 miles and a couple more that are in Spain sketches like one Coltrane has a couple of albums there like Love Supreme and Blue Train.
They're gold records Pat Metheny has two records and they're still talking about life and I think letters from home or both gold records, but no one's really had a gold record, for God's sake, well, in over 20 years, it's People, obviously, people don't buy records anymore anyway. You know, people don't buy full albums, but to have a number one jazz record nowadays you have to sell about 1,200 records at most. If you went back to the mid-'80s, you'd probably have to sell thirty thousand records. If you have a number one record, you could probably have a number one record without selling even a thousand copies, depending on what week you release it, so almost anyone could release a jazz record, and if you have enough friends, you can sell , you have a number one record. jazz record, so why is it like this?
Why do people hate jazz now? If I put jazz in the title of one of my videos, people don't see it, if I put improvisation in the title, people will see it now, people say why. Sarcastic puppies are so popular probably because of the way they present themselves, not just the music, but also the way they present themselves. If you watch some of their videos, they're very trendy, you know, they're young people or at least people. between 20 and 30 years old who play really modern rhythms and incorporate new musical genres with their fusion, so I would say that people don't like jazz simply because they don't understand improvisation, essentially because you're talking. in the language it would be like me listening to Chinese that I don't understand and trying to enjoy it if you don't have context for it like oh I wonder if you know when I'm listening to something when I listen to a jazz guitarist, if I listen to George Benson I tell him that okay, I heard that comes from West, so Montgomery, that comes from Django Reinhardt's Charlie Christian, that's an original line, that's a George type line or this comes from Kenny Burrell. or whoever George was inspired by, that's very important: understanding the context of what they're playing and their improvisation.
It is really very important to know and have experience in it. Very few people like jazz and they don't understand jazz. unless they got into it because groove, jazz was really big and during the big band era when people were dancing to it and then once it became bebop in the mid '40s, people stopped to dance in white for the big bands and they didn't do it. They started dancing new rock and roll with Chuck Berry and all the big artists of the 50s and Elvis came on the scene, then obviously the Beatles came in the early 60s and rock and roll became dance music until people started dancing.
You don't dance to rock music and jazz probably peaks if you look at these dates of these platinum albums. There is nothing if we discard the Ken Burns compilation. The Louis Armstrong compilation there is nothing before it. There's a future Herbie's Cabin, but that's not really a jazz record, everything else is in the '70s and you've got some gold records, like I said from Pat Metheny, that were from the mid-'80s, so everyone Anyway, in my opinion, that is essentially the reason why jazz is not so popular anymore, people don't dance to it, people don't.
I understand the language of what people are essentially talking about, so that's my personal opinion on why jazz is no longer famous or why jazz is no longer successful. Now there are a lot of jazz albums and jazz artists that I go out to see and those sell a lot of records. All this, a lot of live tickets, not many records, but they will sell a lot of live tickets. I saw Pat Metheny play six months ago here in Atlanta and he probably sold out. seventeen hundred thousand seven hundred tickets or so, it's Symphony Hall, but there's no one under fifty there, if you go to a jazz club here in town, there are older people there, so you know, that's just one of the things that are there. really depressing, I think jazz musicians were never good musically with what they were doing either, a lot of them didn't know what cool sounds they were using if you listen to a lot of 80's jazz a lot The keyboard sounds that came out sounded really cheesy and people , when you listen to those records again, they sound incredibly dated, so I just saw a comment that jazz is alive in Europe and I definitely agree that European audiences are much more sophisticated. and, frankly, in Asia, in Japan, in places like that they are much more interested in listening to jazz or in South America, if you go to Brazil, they have a much more sophisticated ear for harmonic progressions.
Historically, Brazilian music has been much more complex than American music or music that has become big in America, so I think that's my personal opinion on it anyway. I want to talk about a couple of things talking about jazz. Walter Becker passed away over the weekend, those of you who don't know Walter, he was the guitarist and another songwriter, and Steely Dan, he, Steely Dan, was a big band here in the '70s until 1980, their first album It came out in 1971. I can't buy excitement, their albums didn't have that much jazz influence in the early days.
The records had a lot of improvisation, but they didn't become more, they didn't become jazz and really influential until the middle of the period, when when they had a son, Charlemagne came out, it was a Larry Carlton guitar solo. that's very much a jazz solo in the middle of a rock melody and chord progression and it's a lot more sophisticated, but when you got to the Asia record that came out in the late '70s, their music became really sophisticated and a lot more similar. jazz and in the chord progressions, even in the solos, and they used more jazz musicians such as Wayne Shorter, who plays with the Tunisian Steve Steve Gadd.
You started to see more jazz musicians appear on the early records. The first album can't buy the emotion it has. real over the years and doing it again, which was Top 200 Steely Dan songs that we're not really influenced by jazz at all, other than the kind of solos they were doing, doing it again was actually really cool. I see a kind of Modal Jam, it's a great example. I always forget to mention that when I think of modal songs that do it again. Denny Diaz plays guitar, it's like a sitar solo, but he really plays guitar, he's phenomenally good. alone, so those from Asia and Gaucho.
I just saw someone put that up there. Those two records were probably the most jazz-oriented, but it started happening in the middle period of Steely Dan when you had lied to Katy and pretzel logic records like that. that you would start to have those more sophisticated superficial chord changes and you would have jazz musicians playing more jazz musicians, but Walter was a, you know, he was a big influence on progressive music and, you know, an advocate for jazz music in popular music in the '70s all the way and you know, probably in the '80s he was 67 when he passed away, so I wanted to acknowledge that I think Steely Dan was the true fusion of jazz and rock. music that happened and one of the only fusions of jazz and rock, if you think that, I think it was really successful if you listen to the things that come to mind when people use jazz musicians in their band like Sting, for example, during his dream of The Blue Turtles album that came out in 1985 was his first post-police album and it had all jazz musicians, so he had Branford Marsalis and Kenny Kirkland on keyboards and Omar Hakim on drums and who played the bass in that band, Darrell, they were all jazz musicians. for the most part Branford and Kenny Kirkland were the most direct, Darryl Jones, thank you, it was a very sophisticated group of musicians, but they were jazz records, although Sting had records or songs like Fortress Around Your Heart, which had a very sophisticated sound .
Harmonic progression, but it wasn't jazz, but I would say it was kind of an homage to jazz or used jazz musicians in a different way, but to play rock music, Steely Dan actually incorporated jazz chord progressions of nine major chords. there's no thirds, two nine-sharp dominant chords or the seven five-sharp minor chords, it's like I call it a chord voicing, so it would be if you did something like a fight, then a D and a G over B, that kind voice is Steely Dan, that was actually part of her post voting vocabulary if you listen to the beginning of Josie's really sophisticated chord progression at the beginning of that song and for the things that were on the radio that were super sophisticated, someone just to say here, said Robert.
Robin Ford is trying to keep jazz alive, what Robin Ford was able to do is create a fusion of the two genres and Jay Blues has never gone out of style, that's one of the things I always talk about about blues music. It never goes out of style and one of the reasons why I think that rock has suffered since the mid-90s is that the blues left rock music and I think that when people disconnected from rock music they disconnected from the blues people stopped listen to it. There was no historical connection to that and Robin Ford incorporates jazz very well.
He's one of the few players who incorporates jazz vocabulary with blues and he's one of the few guys who really makes it work. You will see people like you. I know Joe Bonamassa, who will play lines that sound more like Eric Johnson and are really sophisticated on that level, but they're not jazz at all, he actually has very few jazz elements, guys likeGuthrie Govan, he'll play some jazz-style lines, the ones from If you're familiar with his playing, he'll play something more sophisticated, you, more sophisticated. sophisticated harmonic devices, but they're not really jazz if you listen to him play Donnelly or something like that , he doesn't play it like a jazz musician, he plays his swing, it's not like a jazz musician, so it's hard to find people who can combine them. two styles together, you know, Scofield John Scofield was able to combine his blues elements in the records that he made and you know what he made with those that used more types of jam band sounds or jam band rhythms that he played over them than before. . he used blues-oriented lines along with the more sophisticated vocabulary of him, he could do it, but he had already made a name for himself as a jazz musician, so other than that, even though people were jazz, literally when I put jazz in the title of a video. the videos are terrible and I could never understand why I found out why it always just goes with my theory that people hate jazz, but then I asked why people hate jazz, so I don't know, I'm throwing that out because I'm curious To know people's question, there are people's opinions about that, did someone just say that jazz is mathematics in music, is it that good or not?
Allan Holdsworth Allan Holdsworth uses jazz vocabularies, but Allan Holdsworth uses almost modern classical vocabulary in the chord progressions and solos like a jazz musician but with a rock sound and with rock parts, so that was really fascinating about of Allan, but you know, was Allan ever accepted by the masses? No, of course, never. He had an extremely hardcore following of me being one of them, but did he ever sell? You know, 500,000 records. No, did he ever sell 200,000 records? I don't believe it. I really doubt it. I'd be surprised if any Allan Holdsworth records sold. one hundred thousand copies, I could be wrong about that, but I don't think I'm talking about the time when people bought records.
Still, we're talking, you know, people were buying records probably until 2004-2005, but I think. that people just don't connect with that music for some reason they don't connect with the vocabulary with the different modulations the chromaticism I'm not saying that all people but I am saying that a lot of people don't especially here in the United States I don't like it anymore I connect with that when I played jazz music in the '80s, it was big, I mean, it was still big. I remember people going to shows all the time to hear improvised music in the mid-'80s, all the time. time and I noticed the decline started to happen around 1991, there was really a pinnacle in jazz that I would say was probably until around 1986 and then it started to go down.
Now I have a couple of theories here that I want to float. One of them is that jazz musicians want to get paid for any gig they do and have no loyalties, most of them to any particular band. If we look at the bands on this list of successful albums, at least in sales, Miles Davis is one of them. of them John Chicken and another Pat Metheny another weather report another good one, what did they all have in common? They had the same people in the groups. Well, Miles had a quintet in the '50s and a different one in the '60s.
They were the same. people who played record after record after record and had a vibe that they created and people expected that sound they the music Asians grew up with the music the sound of the group grew with the music weather report Pat Metheny had the The same band from 1977 to 1983, essentially I think they had it, Steve Rod had an 82 or something, but Dan Danny Gottlieb, ooh, I said I met last weekend at Victor Wooten's camp, he came and did a seminar and I didn't get a opportunity to talk to Danny for a long time, but I really wanted to ask him about this.
I'm going to do an interview with them to probe and talk to him and get his opinion on this because he's one of the few people who are from Those groups, so Coltrane had a group, if you think about Elvin, his group in the '60s, you know, this was something like that, but you know, and you could say that the electric band of Chic Korea had all the heads, a lot of them. same musicians, people like bands, but most jazz musicians just want to get paid for their gig and go play with the next person who can pay them, that's kind of the jazz mentality, it's Like okay, people used to pay a sideman in the '80s.
I'd say okay, I'll pay you $5,000 a session to make this record and they pay each guy $5,000, let's say, to make a record of jazz and that was it, they came, they rehearsed for a day. the record and they'd be done and they'd go on and do their thing unless you were a really big name if you were Herbie if you were I'll give you another example Keith Jarrett, what about the trio with Gary Peacock? Injecting Jeanette How long were you together for the first album? The first standards. Volume one came out in the mid-80s. They were playing there.
A couple of years ago Gary Peacock was told he retired. He's over 80, you know, but that group was together for 25 years. and they released many, many albums, people knew what to expect from them, it was a group, it was a group of people who communicated on a super deep level and it was something that people were late to because it was the same people performing. music together over a long period of time and if jazz musicians actually created bands they would be much better; I think they would actually be a lot more successful, you know, with their record sales and with their live performances. performances Another thing I talked about when I talked to Victor this weekend was that we were talking and so I presented some sort of theoretical seminar or theoretical clinic for about an hour to the group of people that were actually there.
Really funny, but we talked about the idea of ​​not recording, so no one was allowed to record, at this point any of the lecturers were allowed to record or anything, and I talked about the people I interviewed like Scott Henderson, for example, when he interviewed Scott, he didn't, he didn't, I mean, I didn't get to interview him on camera, but he says he doesn't let people record his shows. Same with Pat Metheny when you leave immediately. Pat says yes. one person comes out before Pat plays now I haven't seen Pat play in 25 years, but they say there are no recording devices, put your phones on hold, leave them, put them away, no one can record well, that's why there's no one under fifty years in these. concerts because young people discover the music and want to go see it live watching the people and what the experience is like and one of the things that someone asked me to find out if I listened to fish.
I worked with Trey Anastasio in 2005. I made a record with Trey called bar 17 and I remember when I met Trey for the first time, he asked me if he had seen the fish play and I told him yes, I saw the fish play. I started playing a couple of times, but I saw him play in 1988 at a place called The Haunt. in Ithaca, New York, and Trey remembered playing there, there was one in the first, you know, there was an upstate New York and the fish was very big and in upstate New York and then the hole in the club only held probably 250 people or so this is right at the beginning of fish so everyone knows one great thing about fish and the Grateful Dead is that they encourage people to record well why that method of people share that live experience through tape and then through video is what makes people come to shows, but I don't.
I don't know why jazz people don't realize that and I think part of Pat Metheny is that he doesn't know, he is a perfectionist, this is mine, it is not for talking about this but simply for reading the things he says. About that, he doesn't like a lot of the solos and works, although I think they're great, and he wants to have complete control over what's released, so you can't play jazz, so he says that jazz was once really popular. It was very popular in the '30s, '20s and '30s, it was pop music, so I think if jazz musicians would let people record them and encourage them, even that would help them enormously, it would help them attract young people. because you know, I don't know how you're supposed to attract people to your live experience if people never see you play live, so just take the Grateful Dead model and fish that, there's a reason it works.
They play different sets every night They play different jams all the time They encourage people to record, people trade tapes and they have a huge live following and you always knew that, even now with John Mayer hanging out with a Grateful Dead, I mean Jerry Garcia. He's been dead for 25 years and John Merrick comes out and plays and the Grateful Dead sells out every show, still Fish sells out every show, so the Dead had a lot of jam jazz influence, well they were a position-based group and, like Fish, is and and If those bands can do it, why can't jazz musicians do it well?
One of the reasons is, going back to the same point, the Grateful Dead had the same musicians and Fish had the same musicians and still does his thing. bands, there is a personal personality, that of the band, which is actually the people who look at those individual musicians, become familiar with them, would like to emulate certain musicians. I was lucky enough to play with Tray and John Fishman first. The day I met Tray we went to the barn he had, I don't know if he still owns it in Burlington, and we played a song for two hours and it was really fascinating, they would love it.
To jam we play the same song for two hours, that's practically a jam and when I worked on this record with Trey, I mean, some of the tunes were 50 minutes long. We had the feature disabled in Pro Tools that only allows you to record. for 10 minutes at a time because we never knew how long the songs were. I remember a song from that three jam we did for that album that lasted 53 minutes, it's the longest recording I've ever made. I've been involved before and it was really fascinating to work and work with Trey. I'm trying to read these comments, they come so fast it's almost impossible to follow them.
I'm trying to read some of this stuff. Now yes, a one hour Jam, dear Lord, exactly and I don't even know what they are, let's see how it evolved to discover the fourth chord, okay, jazz shows, there is not the spectacle that other genres have, look how Garth transformed the live country shows, well, there's no doubt that jazz isn't, and with the exception of Pat Metheny, Pat Metheny always performed his shows like a rock musician. Everyone in the band had long hair. He had a light show which was a big part. He had songs that had melodies. he played incredibly melodically and when you went to a Pat show it was like seeing any other rock band at the time, except it was all improvised.
I wasn't completely improvised, but the solos were all improvised and it looked like a rock show, guys. they were long hair playing music, they got a guy, the leader who played guitar, eventually they added vocals when Naná Vasconcelos joined the band on the off-ramp record, I think it was or maybe he started it, no I think who started playing on that with them. asphalt Wichita Falls Wichita Falls I think he's on that record. He could be wrong, but another band, the Brecker Brothers, okay, that was a band, although I wouldn't say it was like the Metheny x group in that Metheny.
The group played 300 concerts a year and had the same band for many years for at least almost seven years. I had the same band, so if the jazz musicians had continued doing that, I think it would have made a big difference. Allan Holdsworth kept some of the same people on his records, but not really, I mean, he had Gary's husband playing some records, he had Chad Wackerman playing records, he had different keyboard players, he had a lot, he had some lead musicians like Gary that played with him over the years, but he still recorded very infrequently and didn't tour like Matheny did and didn't tour like yes the report is interesting Victor, we talked about if you saw Jack, you never got to see Jack play Jaco and was a big Jackyl fan and asked me if I saw Jackyl and I'm 2 years older than Victor and I said yes.
I saw the weather report playing. I saw them play and I saw them play a couple of times, but I saw them play in Rochester, New York, at the Eastman Theatre. I want to say about 1978 with Jaco playing and it was amazing to have seen Jaco and Jaco leave the band in the early '80s and it was never really Jaco after probably 19 years doing the shadows and light with Joni Mitchell and then I would say that his kind of mental health started to deteriorate after that, so oh yeah, Jaco's documentary. I see someone just put that up there.
Yes, Jaco's documentary is absolutely fascinating. The only thing I didn't like was the fact that they didn't ask Pat Metheny anything because I think he refused to be in it, honestly there's no reason why he shouldn't have been in it. One of the reasons people know Jaco is because of the brilliant size life album, Pat's first album, if it wasn't for that album Jaco was that it came out in '75 jacket was born in '51 then it was '24 23 24 whenthe record came out and that's the first time a lot of people heard of Jocko and then he had his I mean his first solo record that had spilled through Tracy and Donnelly, I mean, it came out in '76 right after that and then everyone knew that Jackal was in the mid 70s and then the weather report, you know, I mean. he was as famous as anyone, I mean he was incredibly famous, there was backstage, there was a bassist, I mean imagine, a bassist was famous, it wasn't just like he was a jazz musician who played fusion, he also played on stage with Joni Mitchell and played spacey solos, someone says why Pat Metheny would refuse to appear in the documentary, I have no idea, but the fact that Brights Let's Life was never mentioned and Matheny was not interviewed tells me that he just didn't want to do it for some reason. reason, that it was something that was out of shape because of something that I I mean, I'm just assuming that I don't know Pat, but something must have, must add some kind of negative experience that I didn't want to be associated with the movie and I don't know why what, because it seems really strange. and leaving that out had to have been on purpose because Jaco not only came from Florida, but he came to Boston, made this record, they did a tour with Bob Moses that was part of Bryce's life, Pat Metheny and Bob Moses on drums and Jaco and I had read that there was a lot of pressure, I think Bill the Train, think about Jaco's documentary that came out, Bill no Kowski, you say who wrote it.
I think they said Pat was getting pressure from Manfred Eicher, who ran ECM records. use Dave Holland, who was an ECM artist and a great bassist, and Pat Count went back and forth and then decided to use Jaco, who he knew from when Pat was at the University of Miami, but that was an omission blatant in the movie and I don't think it was Robert's fault that he didn't have Pat there. I think Pat probably didn't want to be in it, so again, that's part of that unwillingness to be a part of it. I think it's always been an incredible obstacle for jazz musicians, it's been an obstacle for this whole style in general and you know, people who started groups did much better if they used the same musicians all the time, like I said, go back and look.
In people, Miles had different keyboard players on different records in the '50s, different musicians, not different, actually in the '60s, he had a couple of different trumpet players that played, but generally it was Wayne, Herbie and Tony Williams around Carter, I mean. it was pretty much his, his group, so those were the main players anyway, Red Garland, yeah, in the '50s group you had Red Garland, you had Wynton Kelly and you thought you'd have a couple of drummers different. I mean Kenny Drew is on a couple of albums besides Philly Joe Jones, but for the most part it was the same, it was the same group, the '50s quintet, you know, he helped Coltrane, but he had bullets too. cannon and sometimes the cannonball is not on the record and Coltrane is sometimes vice versa.
I'd have to think specifically about records, but there was a Jenner of the core mile group in the '50s that was a solid group, well, let's see here, let's see, I have. I've struggled with jazz mainly from trying to associate with jazz musicians and encountering horrible egos if technique was the problem, playing heavy metal turns off most young people. Metal is not as complex as jester. It requires a lot of technique. Mark Lettieri, yes. I love Merc Jazz musicians, they are like mathematicians who work hard to get them to work very hard in a group, yes, that's right, it's totally true.
I keep seeing Vinnie calling you to come here. Vinnie, I think so, first time here it was. when someone said Vinnie regarding Sting and Sting, he uses Vinnie to play on a bunch of Sting's records and then he meant after the fragile record or nothing, nothing like The Sun, that's the name of the second solo album. Dreaming about blue turtles has nothing to do with the Sun and then I want to say that man, okay, he played on one of the records and Vinnie played on them. I think they split the drums on one of the records and then Vinnie played on a bunch of records after that, if there are any, he's an amazing musician, one of my favorite drummers.
I was lucky enough to play with Vinnie several times in the mid 80's and the material he plays is simply mind blowing and ten nerd mercury sales. Falling down, those are the ones that Vinnie is in, I think so, so I think even Sting realized that on the first two albums he kept the same group because Sting knew he couldn't come, it came from one person's idea of rock of introducing a band and he introduced the same people and it wasn't just the first two albums he brought that night, it was a live album, which is a great album, it has one of my favorite songs as a solo artist called I burn for you that.
The live version that I will bring on the night is incredibly good, it is a great use of a flat six on a minor chord, the melody that you should hear, listen, listen, I burned for you from the Bring On the Night soundtrack and listen. for the verse melody, it's an incredibly good melody, it's a great example of aioli and melody. Wayne Shorter understood the band very well and Wayne totally understands that. I mean, you know, the guys who were in the bands understood what they understood. Wayne understood the importance because he played with Miles and he knew how important it was to have a stable band because people want to get familiar with the individual musicians and they want to have that ensemble experience, you know, even me.
I'm trying to think back then you had the Chicks electric band. Chick had a band called, he made a three-quartt record that came out around 1982 with Eddie Gomez, Mike Brecker, Steve Gadd and Chick, and that was a phenomenal band, they should have made a lot of records with that, I was lucky enough to see them play, they played in Ithaca, New York, of all places, for some reason, they only played a few shows, but that was one of the best shows that three quartets, yeah, that was one of the best shows that I've seen, oh man, smoking, it's amazing, it was also a really eclectic group because that group of musicians was super interesting to watch play together.
I don't think people want to be, what does this say here? I don't think people want to. being part of a band because it no longer has its name exactly right, metalcore equals jazz maybe progressive math metal yeah, I think it's interesting, you know, this is my Ghent video that I made the other day, you know, it's funny. You, Ghent, right, and Misha, the sewer man, left a comment there and says that's a good job, people say that's not Jen, you're not playing an eight-string guitar or whatever we play, that marigold melody on a sixth string.
I think she plays an Ibanez six-string and I chose that particular riff. I didn't want to make a kind of typical Ghent song, jump to China. I didn't want to do that because I wanted to have some kind of harmonious information. to introduce to people because I said I talked about the theory, if you say, oh you didn't talk about the theory, it's a yes, I had the music there with the notation and I talked about the chord progression which you don't always have. to talk about things, you can actually just watch them and I have the free download for anyone who wants that PDF of that video, so check it out, it's really interesting what he's doing, those kind of chord progressions that he's using, I think there's a lot of really interesting things that have happened in metal.
I think a lot of people too, or we say Rick Beato likes metal and I mean, I've produced metal bands and that's how I've made a hard living. rock/metal stuff like that, you see all these hundred watt heads in the background here, that's why I have all these huge heads and it's funny now because all the metal bands use all the direct sounds and they use ax effects and I'm going to make a video for all the metalheads, i want to make a video where i compare the effects of the ax and the Kemper and their sounds, like when these guys use the evh guitar sound, they compare it with a real evh and show you that me and i know A lot of people record with modelers and stuff like that, air profiling amps, whatever you want to call them, they record with them because they're easier, number one, they don't have a big studio with a big room where you can put this thing going.
I have a bunch of 4:12 cabinets that I've mic'd all the time, well not all the time because they're not my darlings, but I'll get into it. I'll show you guys here, let me see if I can get this through because I've got a cable in the way here, wait, I'm about to go into my ISO booth here, it's going to get dark, don't scare anyone here, so I've got some cabinets set up. here. I use the microphone all the time. I have this Marshall here that has Celestine 25 watts, her cabinet is 100 watts, this tabletop cabinet is vintage 30s, the orange is vintage 30s and this Marshall cabinet here has 65 watt options that sound phenomenally good.
I mean it's up to them to create reissues, but I have a cabinet that I filled with speakers that I pulled from other cabinets from '79 to '81. I think they made those 65 watt selections and they are amazing. good sound, I know this is off topic, but for those of you who are guitarists, okay, so my hundred watt cabinet has the greenbacks and the 25 watt picks, the Grindley greenbacks, but the bottom cabinet has the 65 watt speakers, the 65 watt speakers. selects and they sound incredibly good if you have a really bright amp and want to tone down the top end.
Amazing if they are one of the juiciest, thickest, thickest sounding cabinets because they are not like the 75 watt picks you see. a lot of metal bands use which I think can become very smelly Whoopie and not have the kind of midrange detail that you want or that I would want from an amp. I think those 65 watts just sound. incredibly good, I also want to make more videos. I'm going to do more production videos on this, but the grill cloth even makes a big difference. The cane grill cloth that Orange uses actually cuts a lot of the top end and also the construction of the cabinets, for example the Mesa cabinets, are a little deeper so you have a completely different sound quality.
I have a few more 4 12's in this back room they also have different speaker combinations and you can take the same cabinet you can take the same speakers you can in your 30's and put them in four different cabinets and get four completely different sounds so they're not locked in I guess they changed the subject, yeah, so I just wanted to. I don't know why it came to mind, but I want to talk about it. I'll talk about that in a later video. Do you use open matte booths for different things? Yeah, I use open back booths, you know.
I have a Vox ac30 back here. I have a Fender Deluxe. I like open rear cockpits for many different reasons. One of the reasons you can mic the rear speakers, you can mic behind the amp and put the mic out of phase to Many times I'll put a 57 in the front and then I'll go around the back of the amp and put in a Sennheiser 421 421 and I hit it at about 150 Hertz which is where there is a lot of energy. on guitar, if you ever hear, you know, chugging, if your palm mutes a lot of that, the wow eNOS that comes from palm muting happens around 140 one hundred and fifty hertz, if you want to pull that back, you need to dip them.
That frequency is there anyway, so that's my little jazz improvisation that I just did. I went into the speakers there for a second. You see, my videos and my live streams are like jazz improvisation. I start with an idea and then it can transform. to another idea and then to another idea and me and I go crazy when you guys write something here, it makes me think of something different, it's like, oh, he played a flat 13, 9 chord, so I'm going to play something here, oh wow, that's really cool. he's doing that secondary chord change, so anyway, as a normal guy says, Leonardo says that I usually find jazz random most of the time.
I think that's a function of not understanding the language because when I hear my son Dylan speak it sounds Chinese. like chinese to me i don't understand anything it sounds random he knows what it means and other people who speak chinese know what it means but to me it sounds like gibberish and that's the only analogy i have for jazz and i hate to say you need having a background in music to enjoy it because my dad loved jazz and he loved really sophisticated jazz and he didn't know anything about music. He loved bebop, I mean, really sophisticated bebop and he had no background in music at all.
I didn't know a major chord from a minor chord or anything like that, I mean, I didn't know anything, I just loved the sound of bebop, I loved the melodies and that's probably why I like them too, there's probably something, there's probably a genetic component to it. this. that likes angular melodies and likes chromaticism, you know, but I started listening to rock bands, I listened to the Beatles and the Stones from Zeppelin and Black Sabbath and you know, and Pink Floyd and all the same, a lot of you They started like this. You're my age and I dabbled in jazz when I startedlistening to peep that uses chromatic notes like whoa what is that Wow oh that's cool I like that and my dad bought me Joe pass virtuoso and I tell that story but you know the more information you have at your fingertips and the more you study and listen to any genre, you just get used to it.
I mean, it's like that, okay, that's my rant today about this, let me know in the comments, leave me comments on some. of the other topics you want to see me talk about I have some I have some new ones what we call them Aaron what we call them I have a video what does that mean courses I have some video courses that are coming out I have, of course In the major scale modes, I have a course on film composition that will be offered through my website. They are there, not only are they series of videos but they are also interactive and you log in to the website. you get your own password and everything, and you will do the exercises from them that they will do, there are quizzes and things like that and we are working on the series of training my ear, which I hope to have finished and that within the next few months or so, but it's going to be nice.
I'm really excited about that, so anyway you want to learn how to listen to polyester strings, you want to listen to whatever you hear on your movie soundtrack and you want to know what it is. take my ear training course you will be able to hear everything you say I know exactly what it is everything I know what is the only note that is okay anyway please leave me a comment tell me where you are from tell me what you want to hear me talk about in my next videos and I leave you that's all for now.
I'm Rick Beato, thank you all for watching, it's been great today and have a great rest of your holiday weekend for those of you who are enjoying Labor Day, take care.

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