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AIR RESCUE - How Airbus Helicopters Are Made | Full Documentary

AIR RESCUE - How Airbus Helicopters Are Made | Full Documentary
when you're saving lives and every second counts that's when their time has come

rescue

helicopters

in extreme situations the helicopter and its team help to save lives without our artificial respiration the patient would not survive saving lives in the smallest of spaces the

rescue

helicopter h 145 is a flying intensive care unit equipped with the latest technology the

helicopters

mechanics place the highest demands on material and equipment we have to really concentrate there are 20 kilometers of cable in here after three months a brand new helicopter is ready to go and takes off for the first time the crew has to function perfectly - air rescue personnel receive special training a constant stream of new training deployments and hundreds of hours in a flight simulator prepare the crews for their often life threatening missions I think Boston you're hanging there 15 meters up in the air mistakes can be deadly we're on our way when the alarm sounds and there's an emergency man and machine have to function like clockwork in the Bavarian town of Dona Barratt stands a huge helicopter Factory around 7,000 people work here building for different kinds of helicopters for police the Air Force and the Alpine Rescue Service the rescue helicopter h 145 is also built there the h 145 has amazing maneuverability it is 13 meters long and

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y equipped it weighs 2.3 tons - 825 horsepower engines drive the mane and tail rotor systems a top speed of 250 km/h cruising altitude 5,500 metres the price depending on equipment up to 8 million euros this is how the production of the H 145 starts a computer operated high-performance cutter slices carbon fiber and glass fiber sheets with millimeter precision in a complicated process these materials are combined to create what is technically referred to as carbon composite this ultralight and very strong material gives the helicopter excellent flight characteristics 200 employees work in the production of these carbon composite parts the sticky material is applied to a large mold layer by layer this material is carbon fiber fabric individual fibers embedded in a resin matrix traditionally aircraft construction used aluminium but today the trend is going more and more towards using carbon fibers carbon is a very light material and of course the resulting helicopter is also lighter as a result it can stay in the air longer this steel mold is used to create one of the doors of the H 145 the doors are

made

completely out of the ultralight glass and carbon fiber material first an employee puts the sticky fiber material into the steel mold the negative of the side door this first layer of glass fiber is followed by eight layers of carbon fiber fabric in order to create the extremely strong carbon composite the pockets of air have to be removed from between the various layers pockets of air would make the material porous and unstable a silicon cover creates an airtight seal so that a vacuum can be created in the steel mold hoses are attached which extract the air under the cover and also the air between the glass and the carbon fiber layers after vacuuming a lid closes off the mold this is then placed in a special oven a so-called autoclave the factory has five of these giant autoclaves and they are in operation 24 hours a day the largest one has a diameter of four meters and is 15 meters long in the autoclaves the composite parts are subject to heat and pressure a standard home pressure cooker works in the same principle and is in principle a small autoclave the 700 kilo steel form with the side-door is waiting to be processed together with other parts it is now being driven into the huge pressure chamber an employee connects the air pressure hoses that take air out of the steel mold finally a giant lid seals off the chamber inside the autoclave there is now a pressure of seven bar and a temperature of around 180 degrees Celsius the side doors subject to these conditions for 10 hours and then the composite part is finished since the 1990s helicopter companies have been using more and more composites instead of light metals such as aluminum carbon is extremely flexible and stable and above all very light this door is just one of the ninety four thousand carbon composite components that the factory produces every year employees remove the piece from the steel mold the side door is now finished it is so light you can pick it up with one finger you can see how light this carbon door is and aluminium door would be noticeably heavier that is the real advantage of composites a large part of the H 145 is

made

of composite materials so - for example the tail boom and the cabin frame it is a very large element and when you consider it only weighs 11 kilos that is extremely light the final helicopter will weigh around 2300 kilos that is one of the reasons why the H 145 is so extremely maneuverable and well-suited for difficult flying operations but pilots have to be well trained to handle them in bonn hangul ah 1000 aerial rescue helicopter pilots trained special maneuvers with the h 145 every year there Hecht is an experienced pilot with 5,200 hours of flying time under his belt he like all other helicopter pilots has to be recertified twice a year also onboard examiner Antelias Schmidt the test begins Hecht starts the 1,650 horsepower engines the destination is a clearing in a forest close by here they will simulate picking up a patient this helicopter can be switched to training mode at any time batlets the examiner do things like simulate an engine failure the pilot has to react properly and show that he can fly the helicopter safely they quickly reached the landing spot a 30 by 30 meter clearing the pilot lands the helicopter there are only a few meters of space between the rotor blades and the trees the turbulence here is unpredictable a short stop on the ground the patient would now be on board Hecht quickly leaves the danger zone the helicopter Rises at a speed of five meters per second the manoeuvre was successful now back to base after 45 minutes Hector hey prepares to land there are 320 tests like this per year solely for the 160 pilots of the ADAC Air Rescue 1 our fly time costs around 2,400 euros in this case the costs are paid for by the Air Rescue Department of Germany's automobile club the ADAC the exam is over what does the tester have to say naturally egg door has passed his check flight by success

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y completing this rescue and emergency mission back to Bavaria the helicopter factory and don alvaro manufactures around 90 h 145 helicopters per year the rotor blades are produced here as well just under 50 employees produce around 400 blades per year by hand the four blades of the main rotor revolve at more than 380 rpms and have to withstand tensile forces of up to 20 tonnes a rotor blade has a length of more than 5 meters and weighs around 40 kilos the blades are made by hand using huge forms the first layer is fiberglass then comes three layers of carbon fiber in a resin matrix the so-called blade root is that part of the blade that is later attached to the rotor head extremely strong forces are at work here during flight that is why the specialists who bill them put on 24 individual layers of the carbon fiber material here they use especially long strands of glass fiber called roving you have to think of a roving as individual threats that lie side by side covered with resin they are then extremely strong in the direction of the tensile force they keep the entire rotor blade right where it's supposed to be a roving could easily be used to pull a large truck no question it is easily strong enough for that the inside of the blade is filled with a light rigid foam core this half of the rotor blade is now ready for further processing the steel form is put into a special press the upper half is already in the form the two halves are pressed together with a pressure of 200 bar at 135 degrees Celsius after 11 hours the process is finished and the carbon rotor blade is ready to go visual inspection looks good now we take it over to the crew workstation and quality control we'll take a closer look at it the blade has passed the first optical check but how does it sound two men carry the 40 kilo blade to a special test bench we tap the blade to see whether the erosion protection show which you can see here the light part has bonded properly with the composite in the worst case it could mean that the erosion protection shell detaches from the blade and possibly hits the helicopter with the corresponding force and resulting damage if it sounds nice and full then we're on the safe side it took three years until Christian Eisenhower was able to discern the fine differences in sound however only those blades are approved for flight operations that have gone through a final computed tomography scan the CT scanner was originally developed for medical use it takes numerous x-rays of the rotor blade from a variety of directions and puts these together in a multi-layer model this enables the experts to track down even the smallest material defect we create individual images with a spacing of 25 millimeters and in the critical area we have volume renderings which means around 400 images with a spacing of 0.6 to 5 millimeters the blade route is particularly critical since it is subject to extreme centrifugal forces during flight there is a tensile load of up to 20 tons radiologists order of cop is looking for so-called delaminations delamination happens when the glass fiber and carbon fiber layers in the blades start to come apart a dangerous thing when you are flying that would mean that the rovings become loose the pilot gets an imbalance in the machine because the blade root is softening and he notices that the rule for the pilot an imbalance which is noticeable in the stake means land a further critical area is right before the root of the blade but until the way it is subject to constant impact pressure there is a danger that the fibers might tear here you can see a small bump we'll measure that one its 1.3 millimeters for me that means I have to make a quality report and show this to the construction and statics people this blade goes through another quality control if it does not meet the high demands it will be scrapped later the blades are firmly fixed to the rotor hub the main rotor with a diameter of 11 meters spins at a speed of up to 383 rpms extremely strong centrifugal forces tug at the star-shaped component the rotor hubs are created in the metal cutting departments high-tech milling machines shape the forged titanium blanks with an accuracy of one one thousandth of a millimeter after we are halfway through the processing we let the hub rest the processing causes tensions to build up in the blank and we give them time to dissipate if we did not allow the material to rest then the tensions would only be released after we're finished and we would not be able to stay in accordance with the tolerances the hub has to be absolutely round that is why it is given up to ten days of rest the 15 kilogram hub is finished it's worth 25,000 euros for the blades of the main rotor the next stop is the rotor test bench here the blades are brought into balance when you've let off keyboards when the blades have been set up we let them run for about 15 to 20 minutes and then we look at the data up there you can see that red thing on top that is the telemetry which transmits the data to the control room we also have a camera here and the camera measures the distance between the rotor blades during the flight from the safety of the control room the technicians increase the speed the telemetry system sends vast amounts of test run data to the control room the technicians use that data to find and if needed correct any weak points on this set of rotor blades juergen lool I will now balance the blades similar to a car tire achieving the perfect balance eliminates dangerous vibrations I'm here on the rotor blade these two parts are called trembley's bending these two trembley's influences the aerodynamic characteristics of the blade depending on how the engineer bends these two pieces of metal the rotor will tilt during flight this aerodynamic balancing is extremely important so that the helicopter can even start juergen Lu ly goes up in the lifter to reach the balancing chamber of the rotor blade this is another place where he can change the center of gravity now you can see the springs the purpose of these Springs is to push the trim weights to the front and then you see these weights you can shift these weights to the left or the right to influence the dynamic behavior of the blade we have the blades Center gravity here in the blade death and when I exchange these weights then it tilts to the front or the back and their 45 or 90 grams is enough to do it these four blades are now perfectly balanced and you can hear it the more precisely the blades follow one another the quieter the propeller in the Bavarian town of bod totes there's a helicopter that can take off without any rotor blades since 2008 the Bavarian Alpine rescue team has a simulation facility here where the rescue professionals practice dealing with various extreme situations in the high-tech training hall with 18 meter high ceilings there is a practice helicopter attached to a complex system of rails and wires the system is completely independent from the weather outside here teams can fly 24 hours a day without using a single liter of fuel every year around 1,000 active aerial rescue teams come here to practice dealing with emergencies the training conditions in the hall are incredibly realistic the helicopter has a number of special characteristics a wind machine imitates the deafening sound and the enormous wind of the helicopters main rotor special stroboscope simulate the sun shining through the rotor blades the examiner cazuela is going to look at three rescuers with a dog the specialists are about to take an important test every rescue worker has to be recertified once a year good to see you here for the annual certification you have everything with you right then let's get started with the training the tension mounts the winch operator gives final instructions then the test starts for the rescuer Thomas tickle and his colleague till good Elias this is just a practice run but I'm nervous even here in the simulator you're hanging from 15 meters up in the air a mistake can be fatal today's scenario this Mountaineer is stuck on a rock wall she has a severe arm injury and cannot free herself the rescue team gets into the helicopter the pilot takes off and positions the simulator 15 meters over the casualty the first alpine rescuer is let down and uses a safe place to get the rescue bag ready rescuer number two also goes down he has to rescue the casualty and get her safely off the wall the Rope of the winch on which he is hanging can be let down a full 90 meters are you doing everything okay yes in a situation like this it is difficult for the rescuer to evaluate the severity of the mountaineers injuries quickly but carefully he puts on the safety belt with a hand signal telugu de leus tells his colleague to start the winch first the injured person is brought out of the danger zone the Mountaineer is not yet ready to be transported for the transport Thomas T keel has prepared the rescue bag with the integrated vacuum mattress we have secured her here on the vacuum bed and now we are pumping air out of the bed itself the lower part becomes really stiff so that she can lie there completely horizontally now she would be secured in here close it up and get her ready to be transported by helicopter the victim is now securely in the rescue bag the hook is let down again and Tomas T still gives the sign to start the winch the helicopters rescue winch can lift up to 270 kilos the Alpine rescue team and the winch operator maneuver the Mountaineer into the helicopter but headfirst the first small mistake today will they still be recertified can unlock this my offline octopus accomplice I saw up there that it was a bit complicated the way you brought her into the helicopter the best thing is to bring the patient in feet first so you have your certification and we'll see you again for another test next year the two Alpine rescuers now have their certification for another year and can continue to save lives in the mountains of Bavaria the helicopter Factory in Dona ver up in the main component assembly employees are busy riveting the cabin frame to the helicopter cell riveted joints are much more flexible than screws or welded seams on the roof of the h 145 they're installing a firewall the firewall is there to protect the material because the engines will be installed on the left and the right here they're very very high thermal loads and that stresses the material the two engines can heat up to 200 degrees Celsius not a problem for the firewall because titanium melts at 1600 68 degrees nextdoor 50 employees are putting in electric cables depending on the equipment of the h 145 that can take up to 18 days several thousand meters of cable go into every helicopter but the experts in the factory always keep a clear overview you can't go out and make a large clump and just throw everything in at once the roots of the cable bundles must be separated where the cables have to go has been carefully calculated every gram at the wrong spot changes the center of gravity and thereby the flight behavior of the rescue helicopter the center of the complicated cabling is the main console in the cockpit the center console is the base for all the cabling or all the equipment for the pilot and co-pilot go this becomes very specific which equipment which displays the pilot has at his disposal what kind of client it is and what functions do they need are they flying rescue missions or is it for private use there are clear differences here a monster of a task thousands of connectors and connections have to be correctly installed we have to really concentrate there are 20 kilometers of cables in here and quite a few connections it's important that we don't make any mistakes otherwise there might be complications during flight that would of course be bad for the pilot and even life-threatening after three weeks this h 145 is completely wired here on the roof of the h 145 r2 shaft turbine engines that drive the two rotors even if one of the 825 horsepower engines failed in mid-flight the helicopter would have no trouble continuing on its way today in the final assembly the engines are going to be mounted on to the helicopter despite the robust technology the employees have to be very careful slowly and carefully the crane lifts the 130 kilogram engine into the air the shaft turbine is specially designed for the propulsion of helicopters this type of engine was first used in 1977 with pinpoint precision the mechanics put the second engine beside the firewall as you can see it's a pretty tight fit because the firewall is in the way and there are of course also cables and pipes the crane operator has to work slowly and with great concentration to get the engine into position and we have to see that we connect everything properly that we don't damage anything that the engines function run well the helicopter now has sixteen hundred fifty horsepower mounted on its back once both engines are hooked up a driveshaft connects them to the rotor hub a heat-resistant covering made of composite material seals off the engine the h 145 is now on the homestretch the tail boom is bolted on to the helicopter the tail rotor has a diameter of 115 centimeters and for safety reasons is completely encased the interior the last parts are being put in employs are installing 11 of these interior wall parts then all the cables will be covered up and this is what the basic configuration of the h 145 looks like specific configurations for this helicopter are the fittings for narrow seats that we see here the black fittings from the front through to the back the equipment board will be installed on them where the medical technology is kept and secured up here there are fixtures for the ceiling rails where you can hang infusions the patient will lie down here on this side or on the other side that is the basic configuration for this helicopter it takes ten days for the men to put in the interior paneling and to fit it to the customers needs after just over four months a brand new rescue helicopter worth eight million euros leaves the hangar it is about to go on its first flight with a hella lifter an employee brings the helicopter to its start position on the factory airfield all the helicopters that are built in don't average go for their maiden flight on the 170,000 square meter large factory testing ground test pilot habit Kistler and flight test engineer Molly o hummus' take the new h 145 off the ground for the first time an optical check is followed by a so-called ground run test pilot kissless starts both turbines and the rotor starts to turn without leaving the ground all the instruments are checked while the engines are running the values shown in the displays have to meet very exact norms only once the helicopter is proven that it is functioning perfectly are the pilots allowed to take off the employees of the helicopter Factory have done their utmost for this moment there is now a new h 145 rescue helicopter flying through the air the test pilot flies a set protocol with mandatory maneuvers hover forwards sideways rotation around the vertical axis and with the nose down during these maneuvers test flight engineer Molly Johannes compares the data shown by the displays with the norm values in the protocol later on rescue missions the helicopter will have to start fly and land under very difficult conditions this machine gets top grades the helicopter is now officially allowed to fly in public airspace it cannot however take part in any rescue missions yet the entire medical technical equipment still needs to be installed the simulation center in bod totes it's the moment of truth for alpine rescuer Martin klutz and his four-year-old search dog Conda they are both avalanche rescue specialists and are about to practice being dropped down the important thing about this training is that we practice getting in and out when we're up in the air the wind the weather the noises not knowing what a helicopter is that is something really challenging for a dog when it has to work under completely different conditions than it does down on the ground that's what we're training the mission begins slowly the helicopter rises helicopters are not unknown for Conda but she remains skeptical the background noise of the simulator is realistic and as loud as a real helicopter for the dog with its sensitive ears the noise is stressful examiner Col Sheila monitors the mission from down below and checks to make sure that all of the processes are right the pilot steers the cockpit to the right position under the hall roof we are now 14 meters above the floor of the hall and in just a moment we will reach the position where we get out even if it is only training it is still dangerous getting out of the helicopter is a perilous moment and requires a lot of concentration especially if there is an animal involved the rescue team is now hanging 14 meters above the floor of the hall the winch operator lowers the - into the depths after an avalanche Martine klutz and Conda would be lowered from a helicopter to look for survivors a situation in which seconds can make a difference for those buried under the snow today the rescue team only has very brief contact with the floor then the winch operator pulls the two up again getting back on board also worked well dog and human are back in the helicopter the dog is trembling slightly but is taking it quite well a bit afraid to begin with oh I have to go out again though it worked out quite well and in the air hanging on the winch everything was fairly relaxed the pilot lands the machine after 10 minutes Conda and Martine klutzo Donna the canine human rescue team has been recertified thanks we'll see you again next year in Dona vera a brand-new h 145 lifted off from the ground for the first time and was thoroughly tested the machine has been approved for flight operations and will now be fitted with life-saving medical equipments right now there is nothing inside the machine other than the technical instruments needed to fly it and two seats for the pilots 450 kilometres away in sank Augustine and H 145 is turned into a real rescue helicopter here they are specialized in installing the necessary interior fittings and medical equipment first of all everything except for the electrics is taken out again the team exposes all of the interfaces so that they can install the specialized technology in the next few weeks new analog and digital radio communication systems are installed a weather radar new software applications in the cockpit in searchlights the lock for the rear door is exchanged and now can be opened and closed with one hand all of the interior fittings have to be very robust and that comes at a price equipment like this has to be able to take a lot of punishment take the surfaces of these seats for example you have to be able to get blood or disinfectant off them in aviation getting something approved for production no matter what it is is expensive so a seat like this can cost between five to eight thousand euros and the stretcher at a price of thirty thousand euros is not exactly a bargain either for the stretcher of the team installs a special rail system with quick-release locks 400 sentence of Allah it makes it easier to get the patient in you arrived here with the stretcher and it slides into this groove then you just need to put it into the rails after the stretcher comes the center cabinet where medication and medical equipment will be kept then the team puts in the seats for the doctor and the assistants they can easily be put in and taken out thanks to the quick-release fasteners however their position inside the helicopter is precisely defined I'm a linearity fish a mastery of positions it's they all have a specific mass in a specific position the problem is that moving them around moves the helicopters center of gravity you can slide the seats back and forth on the rails also very good very important and useful they can swivel so that you have optimal access to the patient it's also important is that the doctor or the paramedic can access the oxygen supply 400,000 euros that is how much the installation of the medical equipment costs after 50 days the helicopter is now a real rescue helicopter and can fly its first mission rescue operations like the DRF the german air rescue squad fly more than 1,000 times a year from the emergency hospital in berlin this helicopter rescue team is getting ready for its shift the team consists of a pilot a paramedic and a doctor the hi-tech helicopter has been in operation since 2016 this is an intensive-care respirator then we have four perf users those are these syringe drivers here that we use when medication has to be given continuously just like in an intensive care unit then of course we have lots of oxygen onboard very important they are kept in the back of the machine here we have a compact monitor with a Bluetooth interface which means that the monitor itself can be decoupled we can carry it with us without any cables attached basically we have an entire mini intensive care unit pilot Tomas hi Emma learned how to fly in the military and has been with the air rescue squad since 1992 in his cockpit he gets all the important information in this pop-up we see information that the control center sends us possibly about the accident scene mission scenarios attract person or someone has fallen out of a window or something that is the kind of information that might appear on the screen here things that we can evaluate while we're flying so we know what to expect possibly also information about the landing site the site is on a sports field by the road has been prepared not prepared police are there those are all pieces of information that the control center sends us right into the cockpit the coordination center of the emergency hospital in Berlin receives an emergency call the patient has four syringe pumps okay and you still have to intubate yeah okay and would you say it's a myocardial infarction or how would you describe it good we're on our way we'll be with you in about 30 minutes okay thanks we've got a call from a hospital outside of Berlin in Ghana nzy one of their patients has to be transferred to the Cardiac Centre here in Berlin she's experiencing a so-called cardiogenic shock you have to think of it this way the patient has a heart that is no longer pumping it can no longer support life so she will have to be transferred to the Cardiac Center so that they can attach her to a heart support system the patient's condition is life-threatening they have to move fast the age 145 is already waiting in the roof of the hospital only a few moments after the emergency call comes in the helicopter is already airborne the DRF rescue team is usually called into action when it is a question of life or death bon Hangul ah annually one thousand pilots come here to be trained specifically for situations such as these in these gigantic helicopter simulators pilots trained to handle real emergencies every possible scenario can be staged in these 12 million euro magic spheres we have a horizontal view of 240 degrees vertical 180 degrees in the database we have the entire globe at our fingertips offshore operations daytime operations night vision the entire range flight trainer under layer Schmitt enters one of the simulators together with rescue pilot Hector Hecht Hecht already has 5,200 hours of flight time under his belt but constant further training is a part of his job the men get into the cockpit of the simulator trainer Schmitt has chosen a massive pileup on the motorway the simulator is ready to go time for the utmost concentration okay then let's get this thing going the manoeuvre starts at Coblentz Airport the high-tech simulator very realistically imitates the movements of the h 145 helicopter the pilot senses take in a perfect illusion the internal LED projector shows landscapes and buildings that have been generated from real aerial photographs they quickly arrive at the scene of the accident we're getting to that area again where we can't leave the valley so we'll land the accident site is under a large bridge and is surrounded by high-voltage power lines that means the utmost vigilance for the crew the simulator moves down that means descent slowly the helicopter approaches the landing spot on a field now the pilot is paying special attention to the first responders on the ground no one is allowed in the landing zone done but pilots are often needed after the landing - especially if there are many injured people especially with the situation we've just simulated it may well be necessary for us to give a helping hand whether it's carrying equipment supporting the doctor that kind of thing can happen the flight simulators in Bourn are so realistic that the practice sessions in them count as real flight time for the pilot the DRF air rescue team is on its way to an emergency a patient is in mortal danger dr.
air rescue   how airbus helicopters are made full documentary
Johnson and his team have to transfer her from a small Hospital outside of Berlin to a cardiac center yeah there's a patient she's experienced cardiogenic shock and she has not yet been intubated but for the flight he wants to respirate her through intubation the helicopter cannot land at the hospital they pick up the patient at a nearby heliport the woman's heart is beating weakly she is in an artificial coma and has to be flown to the Cardiac Center to be operated on as quickly as possible together the four rescue workers lo the patient into the helicopter as free of jolts as possible everything is okay can we start you bet the pilot takes off it's 65 kilometers to the Cardiac Center in Berlin the helicopter travels at up to 250 kilometres an hour and doesn't have to worry about traffic jams it is the fastest way to get the patient to the cardiac clinic she is being respirator during the flight if they did not do that she would die the doctor and the paramedic keep a watchful eye on her the whole time pressures good medium pressures good 50 medium pressure 17 perf users are all running yes so the patient is what we call analgesic sedated she's getting medication to block the pain and so that she's not conscious anesthesia medication without our medication and without our respirator the patient would not survive that's how sick she is in less than 30 minutes the rescue team lands in the roof of the Cardiac Center the patient can now have her life-saving operation this rescue helicopter flies well over 1,000 missions per year the helicopter and its team have just saved one life and are already on their way to their next mission the h 145 is a high-tech rescue helicopter from the first assembly step to the finished helicopter it takes four months the flying intensive care unit costs 8 million euros the first responders on board risked their own lives to help people in trouble the pilots go through complex training in order to be able to fly one of the most maneuverable rescue helicopters in the world more than 100 thousand life-saving missions are flown in Germany every year when the alarm sounds they take off with the mission of saving human lives
air rescue   how airbus helicopters are made full documentary

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Source : WELT Documentary