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The PLANE MAKERS: High-Tech Aircraft On The Assembly Line | Full Documentary

The PLANE MAKERS: High-Tech Aircraft On The Assembly Line | Full Documentary
the Airbus Factory in Hamburg Fink invader one of the largest and most modern

aircraft

production sites in the world it's 16,000 workers and engineers work on the production

line

for

high

-

tech

jet

line

rs in just five weeks the team can

full

y equip the gigantic a380 including his exclusive first-class cabin containing a bar and luxury bathrooms every tiny scratch needs to be reworked so that we have really a perfect appearance of this cabin during the test flight the pilots and engineers push the

plane

to its limits they check whether everything in the cabin works as intended and test the

aircraft

's air pressurization system ready then we depress now please pack one check like to check in the modern paint shop the paint is applied layer by layer until the jets exterior is gleaming new maximum allowed thickness is 330 microns so quite thin the Abbas employees have one goal building

high

-

tech

aircraft faster and cheaper than ever before in the face of intense competition Airbus in Hamburg its 16,000 strong workforce make it one of the city's biggest employers the factory premises have the infrastructure of a small town with a fire service Medical Center a harbour and of course their own Airport yeah the giant a380 is fitted out also on-site sections of the a350 fuselage are assembled various models of the a320 family are also built Airbus range of commercial aircraft is the company's most successful product line more than 12,000 ghent liners have been delivered so far while thousands more orders up waiting to be fulfilled Stuart Wilcox leads the customer management of the a320 production line here we are in our hangar 9 this is a flow line flow line is basically a long line of aircraft that start at one end in pieces and come out at the other end as a pretty much finished aircraft each station and we have four stations here in our flow line now has a particular amount of work to be completed once this work is completed its moved then on to the next station where more work is completed until we finally have an aircraft which is ready to be taken out of the hangar and tested ready for its flight the

assembly

line works around the clock in a three-shift system the four stations are each managed by a team leader who must ensure that the schedule is rigorously adhere to each station has just two days tack time to complete it's part of the production process at station 40 the 16 meter long wings which have reached the factory just in time are attached to the fuselage the first step for the engineers is to determine the exact position where the wings are to be attached there are several places where I have to ensure that there's no contact so that no damage occurs between the wing of the fuselage that's why I have to say stop from time to time there might be contact we need to go up a bit or a bit to the side with an accuracy of up to zero point four millimeters the wings are attached to the fuselage of the

plane

once the wing has been installed onto the fuselage our shop floor experts measure the position of the wing we then go in with mirrors and other devices to make sure this wing is perfectly positioned onto the fuselage with no type of stress or gaps or anything else which we shouldn't have on this in this Junction once this has been performed we are ready to rivet the wings onto the fuselage and then we know that they are in the correct position and I have no issues then further along the line 20 centimeters 10 centimeters and were in place more than half of all a320 family aircraft in the world are assembled into thinkin Vader the front section of the fuselage is delivered from San Isaiah the engine pylons come from Toulouse and from Hamburg the tail section the vertical stabilizers are made in Chadha what the flaps are sent from Bremen the wings are assembled in brausen in the UK the horizontal stabilizers come in the Spanish city of Vltava all in all seven different construction sites build and deliver the parts for final

assembly

in the meantime the engineers are checking the fittings to install the wing we use so-called corner fittings these are large sections of aluminium material which have form which is unique to each aircraft they have a general form which arrives here in Hamburg and each one is then measured and re measured and fettled in order to have a perfect fit onto this aircraft once that's been performed we can install this part onto the animal team leader Dennis teacher monitors the installation of the pylons and engine mounts this is an important milestone in the construction process if there's to be any hope our staying on schedule how's it looking that's nearly done and we're nearly finished here so we'll be ready to mount in shape for fantastic good work see you later woman towns in Bergen all right now are exactly halfway through the six shifts the 48 hours that the aircraft spends in construction here now is exactly the moment when we can see weather on schedule we're ready to tact which we are then it means that constructions on schedule and that the assembly cycle is running smoothly in a different part of the site the latest addition to the Airbus fleet the a350 is being fitted out all 261 is home to a large scale assembly line six separate workstations the roughly 13 long sections of the plane's fuselage a fitted out all out to a certain level of completion then there's predetermined intervals or tax each section moves off the assembly line when a section is

full

y equipped it leaves the hangar good production manager Michelle Viet leads a crew of 130 aircraft engineers working in a to shift system here in Hamburg in this hangar we perform the system installation of the so called forward section which starts behind the cockpit and which ends in front of the wings and the rear section which starts behind the wing and ends at the rear end system installation is the installation of mechanical systems like air conditioning pipes and electrical systems so harnesses for data transfer the transport team brings a new empty section into the hall and puts it in position one in the assembly line the engineers use a joystick it's a precisely maneuver the extremely heavy load into its resting place when the sections arrive in the hangar they are completely empty except for any load-bearing structures inside the fuselage the mechanics use a mirror ball to guide a finely calibrated laser beam to preset measuring points a measuring instrument then determines whether the hole is perfectly straight so an a350 product we have very tight tolerances to have a very nice cabin at the end for that we have a levelling of this section of the fuselage section to install the modules and at the end to cabin B brackets that everything fits well at the end we do that with a laser measurement so to achieve very tighter tolerances here already in the major component assembly the fuselage must be completely straight so that large components can be correctly installed the measuring process is repeated several times and then readjusted by another engineer one level further down there we have a tolerances first we we have the levelling of the section and then we integrate the modules to specific attachment points which we measure on top the first large component is floating through the air the so-called center module it already contains a number of other key components such as the plane's air conditioning this module is prefabricated at a separate assembly site and can now be pushed into the fuselage in one piece so specific for SP 50 is that we have the so-called modules underneath the aperture modules is an assembly of frames which we equipped them with all the systems inside so mechanical systems like air conditioning pipes and electrical harnesses we do that outside the section to F during the ramp up an opportunity to move the production line faster so we have decoupled a big work package from the speed of the production line and another advantage is that we have very good economic working places where we don't have to work there overhead but we can sit or stay in front of the product 12 days later the sections are completed now the engineers are preparing them for on would transport but lugar freight plans carry the individual sections to San Lazare in France in this battle of the Titans Airbus with its fleet of modern aircraft has steadily caught up with its rival Boeing of the last few decades ever US produces around 800 passenger jets per year the modern a 350 in the popular a320neo have contributed to the company's success and growing order volume it currently has more than 7,000 new orders waiting to be fulfilled back to the final assembly of the a320 the previous day saw the weakness attached to the fuselage today there will be fastened securely in place once the wings have been withdrawn from their initial drilling position all of the holes and the interface areas are very closely scrutinized by our quality experts there is a complete cleaning of the area performed to make sure there's no parts metal or any other parts which shouldn't be in the process once that's been performed we install sealant into the entire junction area before we finally install the wings back into their final position the wings and the hull are glued together the bond must be extremely secure and able to withstand both vibrations and high fluctuations in temperature we need to work fast because we need time to join the parts together afterwards the biggest problem is actually the temperature the kit is solid after four hours if the temperature stays at roughly 20 degrees if it goes up two or three degrees then you can reduce that time by a third that's why we need to hurry a bit which of course puts us under time pressure effect namely there's been more than one session before the iron ore there's not very older than a cycle the 50 person crew has two days to complete their work before the aircraft moves on to the next station the computer has saved the position data recorded a day earlier and now guides the wing to its designated position at the top we see the actual value below the target value if they match and the wing is in the exact position we need it to be the bond needs to hold for the entire lifespan of the plane passenger aircraft could be kept in service for up to 40 years set fine at the back everything okay Aviation is not yet advanced enough to rely solely on glued components so each wing is fixed to the fuselage with a further 2000 titanium rivets so there is a definite list of activities which need to be performed on the aircraft the aircraft can't really be moved from the station until the work has been completed and so it's individual tasks will be measured by our controlling people to make sure it's performed on time and for sure we do have quite a bit of pressure to make sure this works completed when it should be completed each one of our stations here will move to the next station after around about 2 days these 2 days are very strongly coordinated and controlled within the station which means each part of the work which is required to be done at this station has a very strict amount of time which needs to be used for this part now it's time for the engine pylons to be fixed in position under the wings they connect the wings to the engines the pylons are delivered per aircraft and they have a specific serial number per aircraft that means they are destined to be fitted on this particular one aircraft if one gets damaged it's unlikely but should it get damaged and we can't install it onto the aircraft this can have for sure an impact in our complete flow line we can for sure take a different pylon which was destined for another aircraft and install it onto this aircraft to recover the situation in which case we do have then some paperwork to complete we're near the end of the designated tack time and there's no longer any room for error but something has gone wrong it's pretty tight it's looking tricky clevis is stuck somewhere what's thought yes now stop yes that's better installing the pylons onto the wing is a very complicated and very detailed and very accurate job our experts here will take the time with our jigs and tools to make sure that these pylons are in exactly the right position this as you can imagine is extremely necessary because afterwards we will hang the engines from these pylons and they must be in the right position we take the time on this job and we make sure through measurement and double measurement that they are exactly in the position they are expected to be in the team has kept to the two day tax rate the planes can all move forward one position and the aircraft at the front of the line now leaves the hangar it will be transported to another hangar where the engines will be mounted when we started manufacturing aircraft here in Hamburg in 1992 we were at a tax rate of around about five or six days per station per aircraft we have eight and a half thousand aircraft already built and a huge backlog of aircraft ready to be built and really our customers need their aircraft so we permanently look for new ways of working for new technologies increasing our number of final assembly lines and increasing how fast we move the aircraft from one station to the next we are currently at a rate of two days per aircraft per station and as you can imagine these aircraft rapidly move along our flow line until they're finished at the Airbus plant in fin convertor the world's largest passenger plane the a380 is fitted out in just five weeks the engineer's in Hamburg will transform an empty fuselage into a luxury mega liner designed for around 500 passengers it will however be one of the last of its kind to be manufactured here his Airbus has decided to discontinue the a380 Lars Fischer is in charge of cabin furnishing the basic aircraft is assembled in Toulouse so they are putting all the sections together the wings a vertical and horizontal a plane landing gears engines and producing the the fighter flying aircraft so after clearing this for for flight they are transferring the aircraft here to Hamburg and we are receiving the aircraft empty with some Sun just amenities for the flight crew but the blanket flop liners and open side walls with with harnesses pipes ducts open all the electrical wiring and then we are installing step by step preparing the plane for outfitting also requires the engine fuel and various oils to be drained beforehand in order to prevent the engines from getting damaged compared to an a320 family aircraft we have a much higher complexity in the cabin we have three to four class layouts first class business class premium economy and economy class we're single I usually have one or two classes maybe three so this is a big challenge and the interdependencies of an aircraft which has three stories upper deck main deck lower deck facilities which are all connected we need to deal with a lot of complexity in the management of all these processes as well up the technology where all the systems are connected and we need to have everything in mind if we're pressing a button on the upper deck that this could have an effect on the lower deck the upper and lower passenger decks are connected with a staircase due to its sheer size installing this component calls for patience and precision the fitters need to move the staircase into position from both levels simultaneously it carefully fix it in place rectifying any mistakes later will be extremely difficult you just need to secure it underneath right now we're going to align the staircase it be fixed at the bottom to the floor the interior fittings are delivered by external suppliers the fitters installed them carefully and then cover them up to avoid any damage occurring the side walls the the ceiling walls they need to be a sandwich in Hamburg and we need to put them in five big pieces in order to install them step-by-step so that the whole stairway is completed in the first days the two passenger decks are around 50 metres long and six metres wide the aircraft mechanics clean every window and carry out a visual inspection before starting with the cabin installation we we are checking all the areas behind the cabin panel including the windows if they are really clean and good for for delivery so that we don't have to reinstall the cabin just to clean up a window in the later process so this is our risk mitigation that we have to reopen a cabin in the further process checking everything before starting with our installation the a380 was intended as Airbus's response to the Boeing jumbo jet yet the market has changed now the trend is towards smaller and more efficient passenger planes I really like this aircraft for its dimensions and this complexity this kind behavior during flight when we looked at the wings these huge wings where you can look from their stage over the wings this is an amazing impression and flying with that aircraft is really a wonderful experience with this kind cabin and this comfort which is which is delivered through this aircraft Airbus Hamburg is one of the three largest aircraft production sites in the world what makes it unique is its own on-site airport five thousand takeoffs and landings take place here each year air traffic controller Christian scuba is working the late shift he and five colleagues take turns coordinating the flight movements has to constantly coordinate with his colleagues and Hamburg's other major airports and this special location on the banks of the Elbe requires unparalleled concentration in the control tower a pushback tractor pushes Beluga number five out of the hangar the freight plane then makes its own way towards the runway once the all-clear comes in from the control tower the Beluga can take off some two and a half hours later it will arrive in Toulouse with its precious cargo from Fink inverter there is a daily shuttle service to Bratton in the UK to Bremen and a Sana's air and Toulouse in France the beluga freight planes also collect and deliver cargo from Airbus is Spanish plants in hagatha and severe after think invader the air mass plant in Toulouse is the company's largest it's home to the Airbus headquarters with 21,000 employees although it's part of the a380 production line Toulouse is also where the final assembly of the a350 takes place today parts for final assembly delivered from Bremen ground coordinator Baptiste Tony takes receipt of the incoming cargo Subaru yaar if the vibe the freight plane has just arrived from Bremen it's carrying a wing for the a350 we're going to unload it now then we're going to load the plane with transport racks for the a320 and a321 to Sun as M generally although it depends on our schedules we load an upload up to seven belugas per day said bill get down the carbon fiber wing weighs around 2.6 tons this is significantly less than previous models the wing that were currently loading for the a350 is a good example of the cooperation between our different sites in the UK Germany France and Spain angle SAR la parte order the lower wing cover for the a350 comes from es Gus in Spain la parte superior contain lift the upper wing cover from star - tatelman right Sid robotis the wing is put together in Broughton in the UK and then the flaps are installed in Bremen for a street that Expedia's chopra who writes a few Luther's now the finished part has arrived in Toulouse will be taken to the final assembly line of the a350 welly discharge a pure way is sorry Linda son Blodgett was my counselor constitutional the a350 was eight years from the planning and design stage each plane costs around 350 million euros according to the Airbus pricelist the cockpit was installed in San this air here in Toulouse the fine programming is carried out at the station the wing which has just arrived from Bremen is mounted and firmly connected to the fuselage each wing is 32 metres long and his first glued to the hull before being secured in place with thousands of rivets what's special about this plane is its lightweight construction many components are made from carbon fiber nearly the entire fuselage and the wings are made from cfrp other aircraft have a lower proportion of carbon fiber parts initially it was difficult to work with this material nowadays it's commonplace it has a lot of advantages when compared to aluminium the a350 is a plane with some amazing features it represents the future of aeroplane construction it's really a next-generation aircraft for Bonnie the a350 stands out as an environmentally friendly and cost-effective jetliner well a clue from a strong come along there's a spear Luke what reason for the low fuel consumption is apart from its lightweight construction the design of the wing the wings are optimized as are the wing tips and then we have the new engines which also contribute to low kerosene consumption we cool it on the mineral aquifer Monsieur ingenue nuts corner girl again the latest model of the a350 can carry around 350 passengers and on a single tank of fuel cover a distance of over 14,000 kilometers demand for the a350 is high around 50 Hawaiians have placed orders so far the production rate averages around 10 of these aircraft per month Airbus is one of Europe's most important companies with around 52,000 employees over 16 locations in Hamburg Fink inverter this a380 is currently being fitted out it requires 60 tonnes of interior furnishings and material to deliver just in time to the site the wiring of the jet is becoming increasingly complex as passengers expect the latest technology at every seat today we have tons of computers inside an aircraft just to to entertain the passenger the passenger wants to have seamless entertainment availabilities from home in the car in the terminal inside the aircraft up to his final destination so that he can stream his movies or other other entertainments and this is a big challenge to incorporate this all into the the aircraft so that we have a safe operation and no interference with all the flight relevant systems which which are necessary for safe operation of the aircraft Thomas Fisher is making his way to the lower passenger deck one of the storage compartments is for some problems so we have the bracket in place now we can install the compartment are you ready can we start good what if the brackets didn't fit as the holes drilled were outside the tolerance range using a replacement part the storage compartment can now be mounted in position fitting out the interior of an aircraft still requires traditional manual scales the challenge at the beginning is that we need to have a clever sequenced or to assemble all the big monuments which are not fitting through the door so they are splitted and we need to put them in pieces into the cabin and reassemble them inside the aircraft in order not to block our progress this is quite a challenging task to get them installed and then finished in the early days of early time here so that we then continue with the further installations of seats and linings and headrests and all the other monuments and assemblies which are following due to the size the first-class and business-class seats won't fit through the door in one piece so the fitters disassembled them first outside the cabin on three Nikki ready to pull okay one two and up good and now put it down purpley it's now slowly into the seat rails that looks good the assembly offer of these mini suites starts with with the base plate which is which is connected to the seat rails with all the assembly so which are already pre-installed as long from from our suppliers then we are we are building up the the side walls or the inner walls so we are building it from the outside to the inside and finally we are installing the seat itself which is quite a heavy weight and closing the compartment with the with the doors at the aisle side so we are we are building it from the outside to the inside in order to reduce damages and be as efficient as we can the fitters have just two weeks left to complete the aircraft's interior now they are adjusting the overhead lighting after the assembly we have to function a test of all the cabin systems so we need to demonstrate also to the authorities that the systems are behaving like they are specified so we are receiving requirements from the engineering how to test it and then we are executing this test or performing this test here on the aircraft in Hamburg the giant planes received their signature colors in the largest paint shop in the world today an a380 is being spray-painted for its new owner the airline Emirates the entire process lasts around 12 days first comes the primer coat then the top coat layers and finally the clear coat to cover the 4000 square meter surface of the fuselage in both wings the painters need around 1 ton of paint the greatest challenge they face is in working simultaneously from telescopic platforms in order to apply the paint as evenly as possible so when we paint a380 we apply a way over a ton of paint all together of which about 600 kilograms stay on the aircraft under the aircraft you've seen that we have painted we have a layer of primer layer of intermediate code three layers of topcoat then we have what you see on decoration the gold the red the green and then two layers of top of a clear coat in addition so quite a few layers maximum allowed thickness is 330 microns so quite thin today team leaders in a Osman and Matthias sensor are performing a quality control they conduct their checks from a telescopic platform this requires them to wear safety harnesses final check is the our final quality check before we do the customer acceptance so what we are looking for is are their their minor details that need rework slides inaccuracies in a lining that will be touched up with a brush we're looking for rests of tape residue glue residues from tape that will be cleaned we're also looking for inclusions or some matte areas that will be polished then we are looking for for inclusions or together we have maximum amounts of inclusions we're allowed to have all imperfections we check if they are within the standards were allowed to have or outside of the standards if they are outside of the standards they will be reworked the edges of the cockpit windows there's still a bit of tape there I'll put that down let's make a note of all three on the left side doesn't that's one point yeah there's some glue residue stuck to the cockpit windows we'll make a note of that so it gets removed during the final trick or also during the the customer inspection if we find something we will write a so-called form a a snag sheet so we'll document what have we found what have we done and the inspector will stamp that it has been done this is just for internal documentation and if it's something bigger that has to be done at a later stage which you cannot manage during the customer check then the customer ID will be and then we will provide a rework according to the qlp or provide a statement saying that it is within the limits sometimes an insect finds its way into the workshop and gets stuck to the paintwork or the film crew of any foreign object sticking to the plane are an absolute no-go we also have to check carefully that everything has been removed such as the materials used for masking and taping the surface during painting on fine your honor the final result must meet the high expectations of the customers and they are notoriously demanding entire planes have had to be repainted because the paint was applied too thickly and the paintwork must also be able to withstand stress and weathering over a period of decades expectations for an aircraft like this are extremely high this paint can withstand temperature changes from over 50 degrees Celsius in Dubai to minus 50 degrees up at 30,000 feet these are very demanding conditions but it's good enough to survive that the spraying process has been successful but the result is not yet perfect the painters need to make some small cosmetic adjustments after the final check if we have areas where we're not satisfied with the gloss we can polish that we can polish out inclusions we can touch-up edges around opening door edges and so on and we do that during the customer check as well if the customer has something where he says ah that could be a bit better he'd like to have this then as long as it's within the drawing within specification we will do that during the customer acceptance as well you can we can do about 90% of the detailing during the check itself after roughly six hours the quality check is complete and any mistakes have been fixed Airbus builds planes for almost all airlines in the world the airlines send their representatives to Hamburg not only to pick up their new jets but also to monitor the entire construction process many of them have even set up their own offices here it's now time for the final inspection and handover accompanied by reams of paperwork and capped off by the so called customer acceptance flight during this flight representatives from the airline are joined by Airbus specialists today Airbus test engineer Thomas Heidemann and his crew are going to take a detailed look at this new EC jet aircraft the experienced pilots and engineer begins with a visual inspection and checks whether all customer complaints have been fully dealt with the ground crew has had to retighten several of the clamps the difference in between the line pilot and the test pilot we don't transport persons or our Freight we don't go cargo we don't go anywhere we go mostly from thinking about it back to think inverter even if we fly sometimes eight nine hours we mostly come back to thinking whether or we go from Hamburg to Toulouse the idea is to test the aircraft technically whereas the expectation and an airline is to bring people from one position to another one two additional pilots are on board to assist and the testing process they begin by checking the systems and the engines was still on the ground in a previous exercise the pilots tested the procedure for aborting takeoff easyJet has asked Airbus to perform the test flight and document any issues if the flight is successful the airline will accept the plane the test program which lasts around three hours in total puts the new plane through its paces and from flight test engineer Thomas Heidemann and his two pilots it demands the utmost concentration once the plane has reached its flying altitude all the instruments warning displays and reserve systems are activated tested and if necessary we adjust it test engineer Heidemann connects his laptop to the on-board network in order to request and save system data then the next test takes place the plane is flown at a banking position until flight control takes over during our flight control checks we are checking the coordination of the ailerons and despoilers and all other control surfaces to ensure that the coordination is correctly done we are going to the maximum of 67 degrees and roll from the aircraft which is equal to 2 G and we're doing as well pitch up and pitch down to the maximum of fear which are 30 to see that the limits are very well maintained by the flight control computer the advantage of a fly-by-wire aircraft is that me as the pilots I could go always to the extremes enroll in loads without paying attention on the G meter where I would always stop a little bit before the limit here I go to the limit and the control computer applies to everything and especially which we check as well that all electrical connectors were wrecked mr. g-loads you can ensure that they are not dropping off the rack or connectors are going due to the feelings the test pilots aboard the a320 have to be a bit more careful under the direction of test engineer Thomas Heidemann the brand new jet liner is going through some final tests before being delivered to the customer ready then we depress now like one check like to check those facts providing the pressure of the the cabin pressure for the aircraft are going to be switched off now and automatically the outflow valve this is a big growth in the rear of the aircraft which is going to close drastically to 100% and we're losing through the bolts of the aircraft more more the cabin pressure and we will increase that even by opening some holes of a UNIX ventilation and flow extract check blower and extract now we get a higher licked rate the vertical speed in the cabin goes up to 1,400 feet even higher and the cabin pressures which we can see Delta P 77 is going to drop down on the right hand side the cabin altitude is going to increase from 6,000 feet to finally 11300 feet at 11,000 300 feet the cabin is going to check the quality of the non textile floors which were not put on the last flight in an actual emergency the loss in cabin pressure could kick in straight away here it's occurring under controlled conditions the parameters for the next part of the test have been established Antonio Fernandez checks all the moving parts in the cabin from cupboard doors to luggage compartments and hatches these can become distorted during flight and make irritating noises as Kander seats what is it I test whether all the seats are securely fastened then I check the individual controls lights and event nozzles and make sure everything is working air is really coming out during the flight a lot of things can move it's like the clubbers here and the doors they may stop opening and closing properly so they would need to be readjusted Fernandez also checks whether air bubbles are formed under the floor paneling Wever poof nyet stain Gordon we're now checking the floor covering if air has got trapped underneath it because the covering wasn't glued properly and the air would expand and we would have a misshapen floor lining it's basically a sheet of plastic that's been glued on to keep water from seeping onto the underlying structure yeah that looks good actually so now we're ascending and going to the next altitude the tests of the last major milestone before the plane is handed over if everything goes smoothly the airline will take receipt of the aircraft the following day this is carried out officially with the transfer of the ownership rights the so called transfer of title before this the airline pays the final installment of the agreed purchase price the landing approach should hamburg fink invader for the crew this is always the best moment of the test flight after three hours in the air thomas Heidemann can summarize his findings as statistically the aircraft flies 1.5 times that means not each of the aircraft have to fly two times they finish their program when we do a first flight program and the next flight after the first fight is the customer acceptance flight the customer will take on flight number three the aircraft back home to their home bases then the a380 was once considered the passenger aircraft of the future yet the initial euphoria has vanished while the impressive double-deck jetliner remains a favorite of passengers and lack of orders ultimately doomed the project a bus was forced to reduce its yearly Albert as 30 aircraft to just six the Arabian airline Emirates has the largest fleet of a380s today their representative Armenia is here to take receipt of one more a380 priced officially at 500 million euros Airbus is represented by customer manager page he looks on mr. customer marks even the smallest cosmetics trip of green table yes we are here in the delivery of the MSM two five zero and we have the custom acceptance program currently in progress we start but the program itself is a program which lasts in mine days for Emirates we start at day one with the external in cabin checks so customer is invited to have a final look to the aircraft and hopefully to find everything to his satisfaction on the day two of the delivery program we do the so called custom acceptance flight means that the abbess will be flown by an airline pilot sitting on the left seat with an Elvis pilot in charge to test all the systems to do maneuvers whatever this is in the so called acceptance program modified I mean yova is looking for mistakes and of course the customer is always right his objections are written down in detail and must all be resolved within a matter of days yeah markings are missing the subpoena you may know is it that subpoena that's yeah I'm sure fine I have very much experience with shortening and excess purity subpoena hey III but you can see it I mean you can see it you can see it from here yeah it that's purely sharpening yeah there's no issue the Emirates Quality Controller was present during the entire construction process he knows the plane well it has a lot of faith in the Airbus crew at this stage of the aircraft is more minor stuff it's not very it's very rare that we will find was something very significant because at coming claw into a delivery aircraft has been inspected several times by our staff as well as the Airbus quality so it's just a final check around to make sure that at the time of delivery everything is perfect typically three quarters of the time spent on customer acceptance for the a380 relates to the ever more complex interior furnishings in the business and first-class sections of the plane this includes the staircase with its luxurious fittings even the tiniest scratch is grounds for complaint here we are in the upper deck this is the premium segment of the cabin with first class business class and here now we are in the area of the bar area and many people are meeting here during flight and it's a comfortable stone for for people who flying on this aircraft so and therefore we need to guarantee for us and also for the customer high quality standard while waiting for its transfer flight the aircraft remains parked on an isolated part of the tarmac Airbus employees are now only allowed on board with the customers permission once the airline has transferred the final installment and Airbus has been paid in full there is nothing left to do the Emirates pilots assume control of their new a380 the tower provides clearance to take off to the delights of its loyal passengers the majestic giant takes to the skies
the plane makers high tech aircraft on the assembly line full documentary

Source : WELT Documentary