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Understanding The Curves of The Head To Cut The Perfect Face Frame Haircut

Jun 25, 2022
so now we're going to cut some hair we're going to focus on a long layered

haircut

so what i want to do is really talk about

head

shape basically the breakdown of

head

shape for me it's that there are different corners on the head and those corners play a key role in how weight changes in the shape of the head when you look at this mannequin. I've marked where I think the important corners of the head are, so you've got this temple area here. I have the parietal ridge that intersects with a half round crown here and then back around the parietal ridge so that it goes all the way around creating sort of a U shape on top of the head.
understanding the curves of the head to cut the perfect face frame haircut
The other part I look at is this. back center back here and then the occipital bone that goes across and then down so where I see this corner is the occipital bone that

curves

inward and because that inward curve is different than this part here in the head but a lot of times when cutting a graduation or things like that we don't look at the shape of the head so I pull this down which basically comes out at 90 degrees which you can see at that point and then as I work my section higher and higher , it becomes more of a graduation because this is 90 degrees so it goes from this is 90 degrees here and then as I go up this is 90 degrees so now when I get to this part of the hair and I'm cutting it, it's getting very very heavy in the back the same thing happens when you cut the front to the head people don't think about that and the fact is the front of the head here is pretty much 90 degrees sticking right out of the head and you are cutting it many times up to here to low so you're cutting it basically at zero or even minus zero degrees which creates the most weight which is why a lot of our clients have the biggest challenge right on the edge in this corner where the hair gets really heavy , so for example, if I take the hair and I pull it to the side here and I keep pulling it and I'm pulling it more and more and now I'm pulling this hair from the temple area around the

face

towards me, what is it? what will happen when i release it? it's just going to be heavy just because it's coming from further away and it falls but it's even heavier because now it also turns around this corner so you have multiple corners following the hairs falling out and it gets super heavy so that's what we're going for to do. keep in mind today when we cut when doing this kind of layered

face

undercut for thick hair.
understanding the curves of the head to cut the perfect face frame haircut

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understanding the curves of the head to cut the perfect face frame haircut...

I'm going to account for all this corner shift that's going on on the head, so we're going to cut this based on a side part. I'm going to comb the hair straight back and then I'm going to go straight down the middle of the head. brow here and mostly that's where it separates now the next thing I'm going to do is take my section for the face

frame

I want to see where this head starts to curve down and then where it bends over here and that's where I'm going to comb and rotate back, so every time I want to take a stripe, I want it to be nice and clean.
understanding the curves of the head to cut the perfect face frame haircut
I comb in that direction. I make the hair flow like that and then I take from the point and draw a line around it so it's a circular motion following the shape of the head and what I'm going to do is I'm going to take this hair and I'm going to trim it so that I can see a nice round section at the back and then I'm going to do the same on this side by combing the hair back and then drawing that line around the back of the head so there you go now we have our round section going to the back basically pulling the crown out Somehow, as I talked to the bald mannequin, we're working around this corner, so if I throw all this hair out here and cut it off, it's suddenly going to get really heavy when I put it down. go and it falls over there so what I want to do is work with elevation so this will be a guide ry station here and I'm going to elevate that and cut it bringing everything until it hits this corner in the parietal ridge area then I'm going to do my turn so I take my first section and now here's my target, I'm going to pull this straight out of the head, which will become my guide now as I style it.
understanding the curves of the head to cut the perfect face frame haircut
I don't want to go anywhere really above 90 degrees. I'm not trying to overlay this too much. I'm going to go a little lower so this would be 90 here I'm going to drop it a little bit so this would be the head shape I'm going to drop it a little bit and cut my first line we're going to be working this is all stationary at this point so taking it to the previous section and I'll continue until I get to the parietal ridge ok so this would be the last one because now I'm starting. to dive into that corner so now what I'm going to do is kind of continue a walk so I'm going to take a little bit of this section to get this out of the way and that will be my new guide.
I'm going to bring everything to this. What it's going to do is it's going to be a bit of a fuzzy line, but I'm just trying to add a nice kind of light. feel this and this i'll work my way up to the temple or until you really run out of hair so i had a guide here that brought everything to that stationery over the top of the part and then when i got to this edge i created a new one guide that was right here I carried everything that became stationary at that point now we are working we are working with two different sides of the head you have a heavy side which is this side has all the weights sitting on it so from the side parting left this is very thin this is very thick it has a ton of hair so why would we cut both sides exactly the same for me?
I don't think you should think that you should change it like two different

haircut

s. I still want to create a layered face

frame

on this one I just want it to be a little bit lighter, so what I do with this side, especially since it's almost from the parietal ridge down, so you're working almost at the seam, you know, the corner of the very edge of the haircut, what I will do with this. it's just take a piece of my previously cut section, trim the rest and then I'm going to take a back diagonal parting and I'm going to bring this all over now that I can so I'm going to bring it across my face like this and my elevation you'll notice it's nice and low on the other side it was high because we were taking weight off now i want to keep a little bit of extra weight and i'm going to continue i'm going to connect just like that change my toe angle a little bit work diagonally back bring it up me change the angle of that finger and cut so this is giving me those layers that i had in the first one in that first section i still get the layers i get the layered effect on the face frame but just keep that extra weight now you can see a nice little face f rame layers and now i'm going to move on i'm going to dry it real quick i'm going to use the paul mitchell invisible volume whip we're trying to create some volume on this thing so i'm going to use a little bit of that just to give me a little super light hold, it actually works great on fine hair as well because it doesn't weigh the hair down and once I put the product in the hair what I like to do is just brush it out so I think a lot of people just break it off and then begins to dry it.
I like to apply that product to each part of the hair so it does its job, then I can start blow-drying, and then I choose to start. I draw and give it a bit of force with the regular brush, then I start with the round brush because I feel like sometimes when you just use a round brush it takes a little longer so I like to speed it up with just the blow dryer and the brush won't let it have a part so working it back and forth and then lifting and flipping it still getting the volume in the hair is fine and so as I'm lifting this hair I'm coming right out of the head shape just trying to create as much volume as possible and rolling it all back from the face then i let the hair be a little bit place it at the base like this and then when i let go of the brush i let it twist i don't pull the hair because if i do pull they're going to stretch the hair basically what happens is stretch the hair while the hair is still warm so you pull what you want the hair to let it sit and rest and cool that way and then you can brush it more you it burns and it will stay that way sometimes when you tug all the time you pull it or start running your hands through it as you dry it you pull that curl while it's warm to get it to re-form and set itself from the hot state to the cold state so when it cools down you need it to stay in that tracking pattern so what you'll see is there's a really nice consistency with how these layers are as opposed to it feeling or looking really heavy right there that's the The whole point of this technique is to walk with your weight instead of just pulling everything here and letting it fall on the side part of the haircut that you can see all these different layers, how they flow, nothing looks heavier than the other part and that was my goal with this cut and then on the other side just kind of a nice soft layered pattern to go along with it but it's not as heavy layered so it still has a nice full feel to it to keep the cut from nice hair and balanced now this bottom line not that you know exactly what we're going to here but this part is the whole point

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