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Typhoon Class Submarine: The Largest Submarine Ever Built - Megaprojects

Jun 04, 2021
Hi Rory, welcome back to a new episode of

megaprojects

. This one has to do with the Typhoon class

submarine

. I've heard about him. It's like the

largest

submarine

ever

built

. It's a crazy project. I think it has a pool inside. Things like. Which we're going to jump into it anyway, so let's start in the frigid depths beneath the Arctic Circle, a monster glides effortlessly through dark water and objects larger than anything

ever

seen beneath the waves. I mean, oh wow, how big a whale is compared to a submarine six times the length of a blue whale, very cheerful and armed to the teeth with the kind of weaponry that only leads to nuclear war.
typhoon class submarine the largest submarine ever built   megaprojects
What first appeared in the 1970s has almost disappeared, but still retains its hallowed status as the

largest

submarine of all time. She put to sea and, some distance away, the Soviets called her the Akula class, which means shark, but we know her better by her NATO name, the Typhoon class submarine. ​​I feel like NATO should have translated it directly from shark, shark submarine would have done it. Know? What brought it from the Saburo shipyard to the Venus shipyard in 1979 was simply a different level. The Typhoon-class submarine had been designed as a direct challenge to the United States' Ohio class.
typhoon class submarine the largest submarine ever built   megaprojects

More Interesting Facts About,

typhoon class submarine the largest submarine ever built megaprojects...

This was at the height of the Cold. War where both sides are frantically trying to match each other in every way possible and we've talked about this in previous mega projects, just the amounts of innovation that came out of the Cold War in terms of similar ways of killing each other but also cool technology . Related to rather extraordinary ways of killing each other, the Typhoon-class submarine rose to public prominence in the West thanks to the 1984 book and 1990 film The Hunt for Red October, in which a brooding Soviet captain played wonderfully by Sean Connery goes rogue and that's a fantastic movie if you haven't seen it recommended and people often make fun of me for not having seen classic movies.
typhoon class submarine the largest submarine ever built   megaprojects
I've seen The Hunt for Red October. It's great, is he defecting or does he have his sights set on the destruction of the East Coast of the United States? I'm not going to give you any more details, it's worth watching not only as an excellent film but also as an idea of ​​what life must have been like aboard a Typhoon-class submarine while the Soviets, of course, kept much of the mechanical systems secret, they also wanted the world to know they existed, this is all part of the psychological warfare that is now underway. October introduced the general public to these fearsome monsters, so let's first take a look at the submarine.
typhoon class submarine the largest submarine ever built   megaprojects
The whole thing was huge at 175 meters 574 feet, it's only slightly longer than its American counterpart, while the width or beam as nautical people like to call it is 23 meters 75 feet compared to just 13 meters 42 feet on the Ohio class. I don't think 10 meters makes a big difference, it really does. Sometimes it can be difficult to compare the submarine simply by looking at its length or beams, so we often focus on the displacement of the water. This is the amount of water that the submarine is actually transporting. it is replaced when submerged, imagine you put it in a very large pool, all the water flowing over the side is essentially the size of your submarine and this is where the

typhoon

glass stands out above anything else in a size colossal. 48,000 tons, has a displacement of two and a half times the 10 meter difference of the Ohio class, two and a half times the displacement of water, it was enormous, so why did the Soviet Union need such a large Leviathan submarine?
I'm going to guess here. that was going to look good, there are two main reasons why we are going to go into more detail shortly on the weapons they had on board, but let me start by saying that the missiles they carried were significantly larger than those of the Americans, their power It was about the same, but American engineering was ahead at least in how compact they could make a nuclear bomb. The Typhoon-class submarine needed to be huge to accommodate the huge bombs on board. Simple mathematics. In reality, the second reason was much less practical and certainly more.
Driven by ego, this may have been secondary to the necessary capability, but no doubt the Soviet leaders preferred to enjoy the fact that this submarine was bigger than anything the Cold War game of cat and mouse had ever created. ; It has many intriguing aspects, but Simple Prestige played a very important role. Anyone familiar with the space race will know that today only one Typhoon-class submarine, the Dmitri Donskoy, remains in active service; This was also the first to be

built

and currently operates as a test platform for the most modern ones. The Aluva missiles to encourage

typhoon

s, esc' arc angle and severe star have been kept in reserve for the last 15 years, so, apart from the current path, let's go back to the beginning: the Soviet Union had fallen slightly behind in submarine terms.
In the Cold War, the introduction of the Ohio-class submarine in the late 1970s, with a reported cost of two billion dollars adjusted for inflation, was a major turning point for nuclear submarines. This was not a submarine designed to fight battles under the waves, but rather a submarine with ballistic missiles capable of single-handedly wiping out nations from the face of the earth, they were a fearsome rival and the Soviets did not know it at the time, The Soviets rode Delta class submarines a lot, although they would have been the envy of almost every nation in the world, the Soviets knew they had to keep up with the Americans.
The Soviet Union's records are sketchy at best, but when it comes to weapons production, it remains a closely guarded secret; We believe it was 1979 when the first Typhoon-class submarine was produced. The Typhoon-class submarine left the shipyard to begin live testing and was officially commissioned in 1981. Much of what the Typhoons did with their time will simply never be known because it is classified. And it goes on anyway, perhaps fortunately for everyone, the 1980s saw the beginning of the end of the Cold War, the days of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the world seemingly teetered on the brink of nuclear war. , had thankfully been left behind, while both the Soviets and the Americans still needed to strut their stuff and flex their powerful muscles from time to time. was in the air in 1986 at the Reykjavik summit US President Ronald Reagan and his Soviet counterpart Mikhail Gorbachev began a series of measures that would limit the number of nuclear weapons held by both countries.
On July 31, 1991, they signed the Start 1 treaty, which limits both countries to only 6,000 nuclear warheads in addition to a maximum of 1,600 intercontinental missiles. Now let's be very clear: there are still enough missiles to destroy the world many times over, but I guess it was the symbolism that counted and you know that one less nuclear missile is still a good thing a little less than five months later, approximately the 25th of 1991, You probably know what's going on: The Soviet Union officially dissolved, so what did this mean for these battleships of the Seas? Well, at first, it was really a missile like a new step forward that Russia needed. retain its impressive submarines, but it quickly became apparent that the need for such submarines was actually coming to an end, while a slightly strange fact about the arms reduction treaties was that when the first Typhoon was decommissioned in 1991 and scrapped soon after, so it did.
With financial help from the United States, yes, Russia's old enemy was now effectively paying to help eliminate its most terrifying weaponry. I guess you know, it's money well spent, isn't it? The shark or typhoon was a submarine that could stay submerged for one hundred and twenty days and even more, when absolutely necessary, only nuclear submarines are really cool, but despite its girth, life was still squeezed inside this casing metal, however, there were some surprising additions, please let's talk about the indoor pool. I really imagine or like it. It was like a deep pool or something. If they had additions, they would make these long dives a little more manageable.
Each underwater cave with a small pool, sauna and gym, and when I say a swim ball, I really mean a 2 meter long pool. We're not really dwelling on it, but soaking in cold water after a sauna has always been a much-loved Russian tradition, so why not, unlike most other submarines, the Typhoon class has two central hulls pressurized instead of just one with three smaller ones on top? one for the torpedo room at the front, one in the middle for the control room and one at the rear for the rudder machinery. The two main pressurized ports were of a unique design and each housed a reactor and turbine that would allow the submarine to continue. operating if a hull was compromised and needed to be locked, but this was a design that was imposed on them by the large size of the missiles that were to be carried, it would have been simply impossible for a delta class submarine to carry what were the typhoons.
It was certainly a big boy, but its size wasn't really what worried NATO when the submarine appeared, as I said before, this was a ballistic missile submarine, not particularly fast nor particularly agile, they were not the TAC class submarines that Both the Soviets and the Americans were using, although it certainly had the ability to defend itself if attacked underwater, its primary use was to act as a mobile nuclear launch platform capable of punching through thick ice by firing its missiles rapidly before disappearing again without leaving a trace. trace now that I have There was a lot of talk about the size of the submarine and much of it is due to the 20r 39 missiles known to NATO as Sturgeon SS m20 missiles, each of which had 10 nuclear warheads.
This was an intercontinental missile with a fearsome reputation that weighed 75 tons each with a length. At 16 meters and a diameter of 2.4 meters 7.9 feet, you begin to understand why this was the largest submarine ever built. Ten of these 75-ton missiles are born with ten nuclear warheads. It is absurd that these missiles have a range of 5,200 miles. 8300 kilometers and had an explosive power of between 100 and 200 kilos of tons. Each warhead alone was five to ten times more powerful than the one dropped on Nagasaki at the end of World War II and now there were 200, if you know, the end of the world. was not enough, it also came with six torpedo tubes with the occasional 22 torpedoes on the submarine if underwater combat was required.
Sorry guys stop attacking me or I'll blow up the world now, not only did these submarines carry an arsenal. capable of destroying significant portions of the world's engines when cleaned Typhoon-class submarines were powered by six to five 9vv pressurized nuclear reactors using between twenty and forty-five percent enriched uranium that in turn powered type VV steam that could each produce thirty-seven megawatts of power, this total of seventy-four megawatts would be enough to power seven thousand four hundred homes in New York City. The submarine could travel at a maximum reported speed of twenty-two point two two knots or twenty-five point seven miles per hour or forty-one point one five kilometers per hour while on the surface and twenty-seven knots 31 miles per hour fifty kilometers per hour when is submerged now I say these numbers are reported because the Soviets or later the Russians have never published the official speeds, of course if they remain classified like everything else, but if they are more or less accurate it would make them a little faster than the American Ohio-class submarines.
There is one story in particular involving a typhoon submarine that almost became legend at this time, but remains frustratingly under-reported in September 1991. TK 17, known as Arkhangelsk, was ordered to execute a test launch of one of his R39s without the nukes, of course, Captain Igor Grishko ordered his submarine into the White Sea near the Finnish border and set coordinates for a target thousands of miles away, on the Checotah peninsula, this It was nothing more than a routine maneuver and one that this submarine had done many times before when the countdown reached 1, it is fair to assume that no one on board had any idea what was about to happen instead of The whistle of a missile rising towards the surface were greeted with the worst possible noise.
A Submariner can hear an explosion. The submarine's alarms began to ring frantically. Now you don't need me to tell you that being aboard a submerged submarine after an explosion must be pretty hellish to do and at the same time carry two nuclear reactors and live nuclear warheads.A bunch of them would not only be catastrophic for the crew but could also spell doom for the surrounding area. Captain Grish Cove ordered the ballast tanks blown up. An emergency system that fires. At this point the total damage was not known, but after surfacing the crew were able to assess the carnage simply by looking towards the submarine from the open hatch and it was not a pretty sight, several were taking place. fires. towards the bow, unfortunately exactly where the other 19 are, 39 were still sitting instead of launching the missile had partially exploded inside its tube and the rocket fuel was spreading rapidly across the surface of the ship.
Now at this point, think about Captain Grish. They have under their control a closely guarded state secret that is now in flames that were moving rapidly toward the nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons on board. It was unclear how many had already died, but the fate of the 160 men left depends on their hands along with the unimaginable fear of several nuclear explosions, his actions that day were some of the bravest and quickest thinking of any captain you have ever seen with a gaping hole in his submarine, one would think it was the worst possible course of action .
The action would be diving, I mean if you make a hole in a heavy object in the water, the captain will sink. Grish cough, he was thinking differently, so to the disbelief of the group, he ordered the submarine to dive once more and warned those in the forward hull to expect floods. With extraordinary skill and courage, the submarine crew fulfilled their order perfectly and guided the stricken submarine beneath the surface once more as the submarine resurfaced moments later, the fires had been extinguished still in grave danger as the Arkhangelsk managed to limp home and the threat of nuclear disaster finally disappeared.
Many throughout the Soviet Navy felt that Captain Grish Tos should be praised for his extraordinary quick thinking, but he never was. This was a very politically sensitive time in the Soviet Union, just a month after the failed coup against Mikhail Gorbachev, the missile test. It had been planned to demonstrate an air of normality, but such a close call was not the type of event the Soviets wish to publicize and was quickly swept under the rug. Captain Igor Grishko died in 2018 at the age of 67. Their heroic actions are still shrouded in secrecy, so we know that one of these Titans remains in active service, but whether we have seen the last of this type of megasubmarine, this is of course quite difficult to predict, but at this moment it seems pretty unlikely that the type of submarine in this class was designed to carry the type of weapons that simply don't exist anymore, nuclear missiles are significantly more compact so something of that size doesn't really make much sense, yeah too there is less cock measuring contest because you don't know There was no longer the Cold War, yes, the Soviets needed something to transport that amount of weaponry, but as we said before, the title of largest submarine in the world was a pretty big attraction for them, but the reality is that we have moved on from the era of the enormous. weaponry to something much more discreet where stealth and speed are much more important than size the type of class submarines may have entered the world the only time the technology and political impetus were there to do so another reason they started to fall from grace were the enormous costs associated not only with its construction but with the general maintenance of its replacement.
Borei-class submarines cost about half as much and still pack a punch. In recent years, the Kremlin has talked about refurbishing the Dmitry Donskoy for modern use. but this remains to be seen, the days of typhoon class could end soon and we may never see anything like it again if we can forget the fact that they were essentially designed to destroy the world, we can only marvel at such creations or have This habit of pushing humanity to unimaginable heights and what lurks menacingly in the depths of the oceans during the 80s and 90s in particular was exactly that, so I really hope you enjoyed this

megaprojects

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