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Turning a dead oak tree into a mountain bike jump with a cheap mill

Turning a dead oak tree into a mountain bike jump with a cheap mill
Way back in the summer we cleared this

dead

tree

to build woodpecker trail. Who knows how long the actual

tree

was laying there, but the timber we cut from it certainly was solid, and strangely full of perfectly usable wood. Well as it turns out, Berm Peak is a goldmine of white oak, which according to Wikipedia is naturally rot resistant. Now I’m not sure how rot resistant it actually is but wherever we find this stuff it seems to be more or less intact. With the discovery of this plentiful
turning a dead oak tree into a mountain bike jump with a cheap mill
resource right under our noses, I wanted to find a way to use it for more than just caging landings. So today we’re going to actually build something out of that very first piece we cleared from woodpecker trail. But first, we need to move it down to the gravel road. You can barely fit a hand truck down this singletrack, let alone a UTV. So, it took a little creativity and a whole lot of struggling to get this chunk of

dead

tree

back to the gravel road. This winch I’m using gets its power
from any cordless drill. On the surface it seems almost too useful, but its actually pretty limited. This winch has a built in torque limiter which keeps you from pulling anything bigger than this. With a hard 500lb limit, you cannot rely on this drill winch for vehicle recovery or pulling larger chunks of timber like we did with the git’r. But for shifting things around or positioning heavy logs for trail building, this thing could prove useful. After a long and bumpy ride on the struggle
bus, I finally got that chunk of timber down to the gravel road. And now you might be wondering why I didn’t simply cut this up where I found it, and you know what? That’s a really good point. But our

mill

ing operation is going to require a level surface, as well as shore power. Because in addition to that drill winch there’s something else we need to test out today. I found this chainsaw

mill

on Wranglerstar’s YouTube channel, and bought it for under $30 on Amazon. It attaches to any
turning a dead oak tree into a mountain bike jump with a cheap mill
chainsaw bar with set screws, and uses a 2x6 as a guide rail. By tacking it down with a couple screws, you can square up timber and turn it into dimensional lumber. To actually cut this waterlogged oak, I’m using a plug in electric saw that was under $100. Seems like an odd choice, but a gas saw that can run continuously without overheating is actually pretty expensive. There’s also the noise factor of running a two stroke saw continuously for hours on end. Not very neighborly. But my
electric

mill

ing operation was far from perfect. First of all, I kept blowing the breaker and needed to use a different circuit with higher amperage. Then the extension cords themselves started giving me problems, which isn’t a surprise given the current this thing draws. This saw also comes with a self sharpening chain. It’s a pretty interesting concept, but I suspect it’s how they make their money back on this thing. Replacement self sharpening chains cost $30 which is double a normal
chain. I’ll pass on that and install a normal ripping chain when this wears out. Another limitation is the 18” bar. Planks like we’re cutting are fine, but you’re not gonna start slabbing with this. But once I got the bugs worked out, this $130 electric

mill

was totally usable. In fact, I was able to get 2x12 planks out of this thing. And after a little cleaning up on the table saw, I had more than enough usable wood to actually make something. It may come as no surprise that we’re
turning a dead oak tree into a mountain bike jump with a cheap mill
building a kicker ramp. It’s my favorite thing to build so, what better to test our first batch of lumber from the Berm Peak Saw

mill

? I’ve never been one to waste lumber, or so I thought. But the truth is, two by stock from the store is just so

cheap

that an extra piece here and there doesn’t mean much. This project forced me to use materials more wisely. Because I feared running out of wood and having to

mill

more of it, I found myself maximizing the wood I had, and even altering the
project itself to use less material. I ripped off-cuts into smaller planks, and spaced those planks considerably further apart than normal. Hardwood is—heavy, especially when it’s not fully dried out. But our rough cut hardwood has quite a bit of character. This thing looks like a medieval

bike

ramp, as if it were designed to perform beheadings on. Because the wood is rough cut, it actually provides more traction for

bike

tires. And because I plan on leaving this outside, we’ll get to see
just how durable this wood actually is. And since this ramp stands on its own, we can experiment with it. When I’m about to try something really stupid, I need someone to egg me on. So I got on videochat with Porter. You can’t hear the sound but it went something like, “don’t worry Seth, you got this”. “Alright I’m gonna try”. “Crap, did you see my front wheel hit that

tree

?” “Yeah, I was gonna say something about that. Why don’t you try lowering your rear
wheel” “alright, here goes”. It’ll make more sense later why I wanted to do a 360 right here. But I guess it’s pretty tight. If you grew up around saw

mill

s this was probably not very interesting but to me it’s witchcraft. I always thought lumber came from the store, but now I know it’s a relatively simple process to get it from

dead

tree

s. And as a result, we have a sweet looking kicker that was actually born on Berm Peak. I plan to install this kicker at the start of a much
bigger feature, which we’ll begin building once the weather becomes more predictable. Until then, I’m gonna run the Berm Peak saw

mill

until we have enough planks to do it. And when all is said and done, we’ll have the craziest feature we’ve built yet. Thanks for riding with me today and I’ll see you next time.