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True Crime Story: Dr Death - Britain's Biggest Serial Killer (Crime Documentary) | Real Stories

May 31, 2021
The dull noise of a mechanical excavator disturbs the silence of a large patio. I am well aware that I encounter

real

evil. There is

real

evil here in the dead of night. Police exhume a body. It's a hard thing to go through having a loved one dug up in this. is the moment when the murderous activities of Britain's

biggest

serial

killer

were discovered, that son of a bitch killed my father on Christmas Eve in the coming weeks, the hard night was going to be interrupted repeatedly by the exhumation after X, you may feel mr. Joel Karachi because we said she's always down there and I bet he got fed up with her and killed her and now over the next few months detectives would be investigating the

death

s of almost 150 patients of dr.
true crime story dr death   britain s biggest serial killer crime documentary real stories
Fred Shipman How far does this go? How deep is it? How many people have been murdered by dr. Shipman, I don't think there will ever be an answer to that question. The only person who knows and isn't talking to us today is the 53-year-old doctor who used his caring attitude as a cover for a murder and was taken away for the rest of the year. The rest of his life behind bars raises two important questions: why and how he literally got away with it for so long for the first time. The

true

extent of his ruthless killing spree may be revealed. how five patients died inside his office. how he killed. eight patients in one month how he murdered six patients on a street how to obtain the means to kill turned a patient into a drug addict how he then killed that patient's father when he asked too many questions about his son's treatment how he murdered another patient he believed who had left him a small fortune and tonight we can reveal that the man nicknamed dr.
true crime story dr death   britain s biggest serial killer crime documentary real stories

More Interesting Facts About,

true crime story dr death britain s biggest serial killer crime documentary real stories...

In the coming days, Death will be charged with at least 18 more murders, making him one of the world's most prolific

serial

killer

s. A senior detective lights candles in memory of 15 murder victims of Dr. Harold Frederick Shipman Stan Edgerton was a detective for 30 years, but nothing during his long service could prepare him for the enormity of his final case. He still finds it difficult to accept the exhumations that created numerous emotions and the one that remains in my mind. More than anything else it is an intrusion, not only were we intruding into

death

, we were intruding into the pain of families, just a few months away from retirement, Inspector Edgerton was asked to investigate what appeared to be an routine case and he never imagined that it would lead him to exhume 12 bodies. and arrest and charge a mass murderer, this was a case of forgery and attempting to obtain money by deception.
true crime story dr death   britain s biggest serial killer crime documentary real stories
Never at the beginning of the investigation did I imagine that he would be dealing not only with a murder investigation but with several murder investigation inspectors. Edgerton had been asked to investigate the will of Kathleen Grundy, who died suddenly on June 24, 1998 at her Joe's home, hidden away on the outskirts of Manchester. Grundy, former mayor of Hyde, was well known in the city as a cheerful 81-year-old woman involved in a number of social activities, she was well respected in the area, spent all her free time working on behalf of other people, ran a lunch. She clubs two or three days a week She works when she's not old and did banking for them She was a notable woman Two days before she died a local law firm received a crudely written will purporting to be from the lady.
true crime story dr death   britain s biggest serial killer crime documentary real stories
Grundy who they had never dealt with before in a standard post office form mrs. Grundy's entire estate of three hundred thousand pounds was bequeathed to his dr. Fred Shipman, eight days later, Hamilton received a letter informing them of Mrs. After Grundy's death, they contacted her daughter Angela Woodruff to leave her the bah de Tain. She realized that there must be something wrong because she is a lawyer in her own right and, furthermore, she obtained in her possession a mother's will that had been made ten years before her death. confused and alarmed lady. Woodruff became a private detective and, armed with a copy of Shipman's will, traveled to go into hiding and locate the two people who had supposedly witnessed it.
One of the witnesses was Paul Spencer, Mrs. Woodruff soon discovered how cunning Shipman had been and how she tricked her mother Sutton dr. In Shipman surgery there were maybe six or seven other people in the office, dr. Shipman stuck his head in the door and asked if me and another girl who was in the office with a stroller wouldn't mind testifying in a document, so, thinking that none of that came up, I went into the room, there was an old lady sitting in the room and now I know about the lady for him lady. Dr. Grundy walked past me and folded the document and said that as he passed it he asked the lady.
Grundy, whether she agreed or not or something like are you sure this is okay? He indicated where he should sign the document. The document was folded so that he could not read it. I couldn't see what. It was in the document and being in the dotter consultation it did not occur to me to ask me the name Mrs. Grundy's signature was already on the document I thought she was signing a medical form I didn't believe for a minute she was signing a will I would expect you to sign wheels at the attorney's office it's not at the dr. the surgery lady.
Grundy believed he was signing a release giving his approval to participate in a survey on aging for the University of Manchester. Shipman's greed was his downfall. Woodruff went to police in her hometown of Lemming Tain's Spa, who referred her complaint to Greater Manchester Police. The file fell onto Inspector Edgerton's desk. After talking to Angela Woodruff, the deceased daughter, we realized that we were all in a can of worms and I don't know at the time how far it was going to go, although it's very fair to say that I still didn't think at this point that I was watching a murder investigation and returning to hide from seeing Mrs.
Woodruff Sr. Edgerton realized that this was not the first time the police had shown interest in Dr. Shipman, four months earlier, after a GP raised concerns about the high number of deaths among Shipman's patients, local coroner John Pollard ordered a secret police investigation. I was originally approached by a local GP in the Hyde area and she felt that she had been signing quite a few second cremation certificates than would normally be the case when she first told me that she was a dr. Shipman and based on that, she called me on the phone and asked me to look into the matter to make sure everything was as it should be.
There were two possible explanations: one was that something untoward was happening or the other explanation was that dr. . Shipman was simply a very, very conscientious family doctor and was seeing many patients shortly after his death at his home, but the concerned doctor was not the only person who noticed the abnormal number of deaths certified by Shipman Undertaker. Debbie bam. Broth was another highly respected family business. Frank Massey and his son are Hyde's largest independent funeral directors. We were worried that there would be too many deaths in a single surgery, especially when that surgery only had one doctor, most of the deaths seemed to fit a pattern usually ladies almost always ladies never anyone who had been sick as in terminally ill seems strange that almost all the people who had died were dressed in özil, so they were usually in bed with night clothes on, that was never the case, they were always fully dressed as if they had just returned from shopping it was very rare that someone died in bed he was usually sitting in a chair in the living room things just didn't add up we talked about it as a family um the The circumstances of the deaths never came to me one day and they just told me that she was worried about all these sudden deaths, that it was dr.
Shipman was signing the forms and I said there was nothing to worry about, she's just with her old patients and I think she had a conversation with another doctor about it and then she had another conversation with me, this was a couple of months later, something like Oh, so the way I thought I would, I don't talk to Dr. Shipman, well my dad went to see dr. Shipman about the concerns we had, I think it took a lot of courage to do that, it was ridiculous, we trusted a man, we trusted a doctor, and for us to make key accusations, to make assumptions, to have concerns about a doctor maybe murdering people because that's what it is that I was the last to enter the surgery at that moment he told me yes, come in, I went to his surgery, I told him then that he was a bit of a bad temper, the goal of embarrassing why I came, I will explain.
He said that he himself, based on the data, was a little concerned about some of these deaths. He didn't show any signs of shock. Nothing is surprising. He simply said: I'll show you. He took out the book from him, which is a record. The T keeps a copy. of the certificate that he gave to a next of kin of a deceased person and he showed me there and said that anyone can come and see this movement. The desires in our minds had been calmed perhaps not completely, but they had been calmed thanks to Several people in authority said that there was nothing wrong, we had an issue with the car, the police officer said the officer, and everything was settled.
What it boils down to is that he has a lot of patients, elderly patients, and he's such a caring doctor that he just suffers more deaths. than anyone and with that I was quite satisfied that the police carried out a full investigation and at that stage, based on the instructions that I gave them, I was quite satisfied with the investigation that they did, but it didn't lead to anything that they couldn't see. whatever was wrong at that moment mr. Pollard's instructions that Shipman should not be informed of any investigation or his source prevented the police from carrying out a full investigation.
I would continue to go see my doctor, dr. Shipman was normal and the more time he sat in his room, the more he thought about how ridiculous these suspicions and worries had been. It was impossible to think that my doctor whom he trusted and trusted could be doing something so terrible aware of Debbie's father's visit. That his murderous activities had aroused suspicion caused the shipment to panic and he quickly decided to fake the lady. Inspector Edgerton believes Grundy's will to provide him with the funds to escape. Several sources have suggested that one of the reasons he may have forged the will as he did was that he thought her world was collapsing around her.
I personally don't share that view at all, I firmly believe that he thought he was so invincible, so super intelligent, that he thought the police were not aware of what was happening after the coroner's inquest. Shipman's belief that he could deceive. Someone led him to commit three more murders, the last one was the lady. Grundy, his crude forging of will was the act of supreme arrogance that was to be his undoing. I think the hair part of him turned out well for as long as I've had it. Nobody asked me about that. He always asked me about.
I might as well let Bob know that this may well have been his thinking and he proceeded to draw up that will which when you look at it is just an amateurish attempt, the investigation was starting to take off at a rapid rate of knots and I have to say that Detective Superintendent Bernhard realized how cold things were then and said, well, let's sit down and go through this piece by piece and simulate exactly what we have, must have made him sit up abruptly in his chair when a detective inspector suddenly spoke about the exhumation of corpses, but to give him his due it didn't take him long to realize and understand that what I was telling him was probably the only direction we could go in the dark of the night. month after Mrs.
Grundy was buried at Hyde Chapel. Inspector Edgerton was in charge of exhuming her body. The actual logistics of doing an exhumation is a gigantic operation. There are so many things to consider, to maintain the decency of the matter, respect and reverence must be shown to the deceased remains, the family to be considered, we have to make sure we have identified the correct grave, we have to date soil samples, make sure the monster will warn us. because we are going to have an autopsy. It was a strange feeling to be there at three in the morning, in total darkness, with a team of men who were going to dig up a body, being the senior officer in the exhumations.
I was also aware of the well-being of all the staff who were there even though some of them are not police? There were civilian members of the support staff. I was aware of his feelings at the same time that Mrs. Grundy was being exhumed. Stan Edgerton had a team of detectives raid Shipman's home and office in search of the typewriter and other evidence used to falsify Dr. . Shipman was very aware of what we were looking for and, in fact, he produced the typewriter, which is a typewriterportable and did not seem like a very expensive machine, but he produced it from a closet in the office, the typewriter, the forged will and the samples taken.
Mrs Grundy's liver and muscle tissue were sent to Chorley Forensic Science Laboratory for analysis, experts quickly established that Shipman's typewriter had been used to forge the will and letter, but while the inspector Edgerton was waiting for the lady. After Grundy's post-mortem results, he was approached by a local taxi driver who had built up his own file of suspicions against Shipman going back many years - perhaps two dozen of my clients died under very similar circumstances, all of them. Dr. Shipman's people were receiving the doctor's car and a couple of hours after he visited them, they were eliminated.
His wife discouraged John from going to the police, worried about wrongly accusing a highly respected doctor of murder, but when the investigation into Kathleen Grundy's death began, she decided it was time to act when I approached Mr. Edgerton after death of Kathleen Gandhi and told him that I had compiled a list of my clients who died in similar situations. Kathleen Gandhi's circumstances dating back six years, he was shocked when I questioned him and walked in, it was clearly evident to me that we were going to have We had to examine other people's deaths, there were reactions and when that was discussed by the senior management teams we then decided that yes, we would have to examine more exhumations, partly because of the death of Shipman's mother and how that could have been the trigger. of the murder.
Harold Frederick Shipman was born in Nottingham in January 1946, his early years were spent in this house on Long Meat Drive his father also Harold Frederick was a long distance lorry driver his mother Vera was ill for many years slowly dying of cancer Fred, the middle child Of three children, he was the smart one in the family, spending his eleventh year. In addition to the local primary school Hi pavement, although he was never a great flyer and in the current of the sea, Shipman was respected by the other children for his sporting prowess on the track athletics field and the rugby field, as seen here securing the ball in a line in some rare images. from a school match Shipman is well remembered by his old schoolmates I was a friend of Fred we were in the same year we played rugby together he was a very capable sportsman and notable for his rugby and also for his athletics Fred was a very calm individual and calm until he got to the rugby field and then was quite a fiery character, but as an individual off the field, a very calm and collected young man passed the 500 G CES level and entered sixth form only for disaster to strike. strike his mother died Fred was only 17 years old Veera Shipman had fought a long and courageous battle against cancer with increasing daily injections of morphine some believe that this early introduction to morphine and death had a lasting effect on young Fred his reaction at that time was considered strange, it must have been a Monday morning, something we met and were walking back to school, how did you know what he did over the weekend?
And I told him what he had done over the weekend and I asked you what. He had done it and said oh, my mom died, what did you do? You know it must have been horrible and he said that in our garden I went out for a run, but he kept saying that he actually he had run until I think he said two. o'clock in the morning or so and in the pouring rain after his mother's death, Shipman decided to become a doctor. He spent the next six years as a medical student here at the University of Leeds.
In his first year he met his wife Primrose Ox Toby and then a beautiful 17-year-old window dresser. Within a few months, she was pregnant with Sarah, the first of her four children, and, against her parents' wishes, They got married quietly after a couple of years of training as a domestic worker. Shipman joined a GP practice group in the Yorkshire industrial town. from Todmorden in the mid-1970s, he is fondly remembered for his enthusiasm. He started with an enthusiastic young man who presented the latest ideas and techniques with a lot of enthusiasm and a lot of practice, putting them into practice and encouraging us all to do our best.
Same thing and I think we all benefit from Sargen having him with us despite his popularity. Fred ran into trouble and started having mysterious blackouts. Dr. Grieve Shipman's senior partner at the time remembers being called to Fred's house after he collapsed in the bathroom. He had one or two faints and was eventually diagnosed with epilepsy by a consultant and couldn't drive a car, so his wife volunteered to complete this. to be able to continue working, which he did very efficiently, but Fred Shipman had not told his colleagues the truth, he was a drug addict with a huge dependence on pethidine, a painkiller used in childbirth, I mean, no There was no big disaster or anything like that.
It was simply that he couldn't anymore. He was a sick doctor, whoever he had to go to. In February 1976, Harold Frederick Shipman appeared in the dock at Halifax Magistrates' Court and admitted eight counts of obtaining drugs by deception and asked that another 74

crime

s would be taken into consideration. Fined £600, the court heard he obtained the highly addictive drug by overprescribing it to patients at a local nursing home and forging prescriptions. Shipman agreed to undergo treatment at the renowned York Retirement Hospital, although the General Medical Council did not agree. He notified Shipman that he was not free of his addiction in 1979.
He applied to join a practice group in Hide, a small Cheshire market town with a population of 60,000. In their interview, the six partners were impressed by Shipman, particularly his honesty that he had been an addict. pethidine, they decided to give it a second chance. Fred Shipman threw himself into local community life as a working doctor and as a member of local organizations such as the John Ambulance Brigade, the Scouts and as a governor of a local school, he soon became so popular. that he had a long waiting list of people who wanted to join his panel, but in 1991 Shipman dropped a bombshell on his partners after almost 12 years: He was leaving to work alone in a one-handed practice and flippantly announced that he would take to his 3,000 patients with For him, the farewell was bitter, but Shipman didn't care;
He had carefully planned the move for months and within weeks opened just a few yards away in a converted shop on Market Street, now unsupervised he could enjoy his secret self-indulgent murder and, as a solo GP, he would show them how good he was. was and how he could help people and do things his way and without the restraints of working in an association and the limitations of testing yourself daily against your colleagues. perhaps that was one of the factors that led him to go off the rails. The severity with which Shipman had gone off the rails only became clear when the toxicology results came back from the forensic science laboratory.
I'm still amazed that the results we got from the forensic examination were what they were. I didn't expect that for a minute the death certificate issued by Shipman would record that Kathleen Grundy had died of old age, the truth is that she had been murdered by such a massive dose of morphine. amount that the coroner Scientists had no doubt that death would have occurred in a fairly short time. She had gone to visit him the day before her death around 4 o'clock and he made an appointment with her to come and take a blood sample the next day.
In the morning, he made an appointment to kill her when she questioned him. Shipman's incredible claim was that Ms Grundy, at 81, was a heroin addict, what had begun as a simple fraud investigation was now a full-scale murder investigation. Information flooded in from anxious people calling special helplines and detectives began to notice a pattern in the deaths, the number of people who died at home single women living alone dying within an hour a soul of seeing dr. Dying Shipman sat in a chair dressed in day clothes, so many of them went to surgery and died in surgery, he just took logic to something you couldn't believe and immediately we knew we were probably dealing with one of the

biggest

. murder investigations one could imagine, but it was Shipman's fascination with computers that would provide another major breakthrough for the investigation team and help convict him.
Detectives examined the deaths of nearly 100 and 50 of his patients. They checked some of the computerized records of some of the deceased patients and revealed that in their office visits things that were written about the patient's health had been deleted and we can only assume that this was done because it did not correspond with what was in death. certificate on other occasions appeared physically in the patient's file when in reality we believed that no office visit was made it was as if he was constructing a

story

that related to the medical records he wrote on the death certificate that he was certainly covering his tracks for a reason, and police computer experts soon discovered what it was.
Shipman was altering patients' records to hide his

crime

s and sometimes, to save time, he would record their deaths before killing them. The number of deaths towards the end. increasing at such a rapid rate that sometimes we wondered if he had time to prepare much of what he was doing and that is why he was changing the medical records around the time the person died shortly after and in fact in one case he was altering records even before the body was found. What we decided to do was go back over a 12 month period and determine how many people had died and how many death certificates at the hospital dr.
Shipman had written that in a 12 month period there were about 36 deaths, one of the things that caught our attention was that there had never been an autopsy and we also realized that the number of deaths in a 12 month period was two and a half times more than the average an incident room had been installed a highlighted and discontinuous police station staffed by 56 carefully selected detectives special flowcharts were designed showing when, where, how and under what circumstances patients had died in the previous period. five years our investigations established that on many occasions dr. Shipman had seen them on the day they died, in many cases he had seen them within, if not an hour, certainly a couple of hours after death and again that became illogical.
Alice's kitchen was one of those illogical cases Shipman had visited. shortly before she died, but there was something unusual that bothered her family, the whole family was very surprised and wondered why she was sitting where she was on the couch, because she never sits there, she always sits in a chair from where she can see out the window and as soon as someone stops she has the door open ready for them before they get to the door she always sits there and where they found her in town she had her back to the window and I know a neighbor who was The interviewee was asked if she saw Dr.
Shipman coming or going and she said he was leaving while she was going into her house and she thought it was unusual for my mother to be sitting in town, she could see her back and she said she never sits there and she always walks everyone up the door and she didn't go with him, she thought it was strange and dr. Shipman never spoke to her and never told her that she wasn't feeling well, are you going to sit in the weather or something? Alice Kitchen may have died in an unusual chair at home, but five of Dr.
Shipman's patients died in an even more unlikely place: his surgery, we talked to several doctors and said, well, you know, in terms of you ever had a day as a patient in surgery and most of the doctors look horrified , just like that, it never happens. Edith Brady, 72, a long-term patient of Fred Shipman, died in his office. Edith loved social occasions and she was the chief guest at the family's Christmas party a few months before her death. She told me that she had gone back. space for her to lie down and he just walked in and found her dead and he worked on her and nothing could be done so we spent some time when I gave him a kiss and an artist tied her up and they said it was hers heart of her. and we just accepted that that was what it was and I was glad she didn't have part of the trip and I didn't want to, Mr.
Bo, I just said well, I'm, you know, I'm glad she was. there and said, well, she's not the first to die, there was another lady who died here, she said that at that moment and I was happy because that was the place where she liked to be, she liked dr. Shipman wants to joke about it because we said she's always down there and I bet he got sick of her and killed her and now I know when I think about it, it'sIncredible that detectives were also noting other disturbing facts that Shipman had been present when six of his patients died on a street in an 18 month period and that in one month eight female patients died mysteriously, we saw that on one occasion in one month in particular eight people died, which is an average of two a week and whenever we talk to other people in the medical profession who were left behind in a maze in the third part how the shipments stole their patients and acquired their means to kill for the second time hide was overshadowed by mass murder in the mid 1960s it was the home of Myra Hindley and Ian Brady, the Moors killers, it was now the home of Fred Shipman and as the new investigation grew once Furthermore, the population faced the horror of killing by attending the excavations of their parishioners' father, Dennis, who would be found as a central figure, the Warren community would be quite a shock. way to describe it in shock, they just couldn't believe this was happening and didn't want to believe it was all a bad dream.
In addition to this feeling of shock and disbelief and a destruction of trust, people also had a feeling of guilt. I had suspicions but didn't express or talk about them for several reasons because at the time they didn't want to upset other family members, but a more common factor is who would have believed me anyway if I had told this to anyone. Anyone, Father Dennis, vividly remembers Shipman's dismissive attitude toward Winnie Miller's grieving family just hours after he murdered her, her daughters were in deep shock. I was also very surprised and very sad because it was so much fun to win.
She was a lovely person and The doctor came in very abruptly and said something like you were out or her mother had a heart condition. I could see the surprised expression and the daughters' faces. He kept saying that she would not accept the treatment and she would not go to the hospital, the daughters now look at him in amazement. He immediately followed up by saying: do you have an undertaker? And at that point I stepped in and said, well, the woman just died and I think we'll just leave. which at that point he then went on to say and by the way there is no problem with issuing a death certificate I can do it, I can do it, you just go on to the surgery and that was it, he left knowing what I know now that I couldn't' I'm certainly not saying that was making sure that nothing would go wrong and that there would be no element of guilt or suspicion on him when detectives searched Shipman's home and found a large quantity of rings and other jewelry stuffed in a bag in the garage, this habit of pettiness. robbery of his victims caused disputes within their families, several members had a family questioned as a whole, gasps our first and the mother's home found first, etc., and it is generating some sort of suspicion all over the place.
I also know a family. that one of the women on the day of her death had gone to collect our pension, which would have been about 7,080 pounds. He certainly didn't spend all that that afternoon, but there was no money in his purse after her death. You never know how often Shipman emptied his victims' purses for paltry sums, but from one of them he hoped to inherit £60,000. Bianca Pomfrit was the youngest of Shipman's victims, she was only 49 years old when he killed her, she was divorced and suffered from manic depression. pomfret had come to depend on dr.
Long

story

short, Shipman thought a lot of him to the point that several years ago we were contemplating moving house and one of the reasons we didn't move is that she emphasized that she would have preferred to have looked sideways and under dr. . Shipman now, I think that if someone puts the relationship they have with the doctor above, moving on to a new life as a farmer, it has to be a pretty close bond, with so much soul that she informed me several months before her death that she would actually leave all. money and property to him in a will, she also claimed that she told dr.
Shipman, fortunately I convinced her that the right thing to do would be to leave her money and property to her grandchildren. I can't speculate on why Shipman murdered Bianca, whether or not it was due to the fact that he thought he was going to benefit financially or maybe even if she hadn't found him she realized he had been cornered oh well I don't know Bianca Pomfret was the fourth victim to be exhumed. In the following month the police opened 8 more graves and removed the bodies for examination. each body contained varying levels of morphine, but even without a body, the police were able to charge Shipman with the murder of six patients who had been cremated, which is why the computer and other circumstantial evidence was so incriminating that they were presenting us in relation to those. bodies where they had been cremated was so overwhelming as far as we were concerned that we could no longer put it aside.
It was becoming obvious to the police that Shipman arrogantly believed that he had created the perfect murder and gotten away with it. For years he believed that he was able to cope with the fact that people did not have a superior enough intellect to analyze and establish the facts of what had happened here when he was arrested. Detectives like Stan Edgerton saw that arrogance early on. During the interrogation, his arrogance was in the foreground the entire time, every time I spoke to him, it was clearly obvious that he thought I was beneath him and that he gave the clear impression that it should be at least a superintendent who was talking with him. him and dealing with him and he made it very clear to me that I was not his intellectual equal.
I think he came to be interviewed for the first time on September 7th and I was walking through the door I was expecting. He was leaving around five in the afternoon. I think he was shocked when he was accused of murder. You could see his demeanor change. His voice changed. The arrogance was the first thing that went away and then, to a certain extent, he tried to do it. controlling the interview by changing the subject or trying to indicate to the officers who interviewed him that they didn't understand and as we went through the interviews and presented him with the forensic evidence, the morphine in the body, he still couldn't explain that.
He couldn't explain the medical records again why they had been changed. He eventually became increasingly distressed and at one point collapsed, but what really surprised hardened detectives like Inspector Edgerton were the cynical and ruthless efforts Shipman made to obtain his morphine-killing gun Two years ago, the former pilot of airline Jim King was wrongly diagnosed with cancer a week after marrying his American wife Debbie, after undergoing three months of painful chemotherapy. Shipman was told that he had never had cancer, but Shipman couldn't convey the good news. Instead, Shipman continued to prescribe Jim massive amounts of morphine to maintain a regular supply of his murder weapon.
Consultants from different hospitals told him on three separate occasions that I had not had cancer. He had never had cancer, but he still proceeded to do this. sooner or later you can guarantee that you will acquire heroin that has not been used and that you basically do not have to account for Jim's father, a patient at the shipment was so concerned about his son's health that he began to ask too many questions for Jim's liking. Shipman and the doctor killed him, my father had gone to the office several times to ask dr. Shipman, what was going on with my kiss?
Because he could see how I was deteriorating rapidly with the amount of morphine he was using. I mean, that son of a bitch killed my father on Christmas Eve. Of all the days he planned to do this, and I believe he did it. that because I needed to stop this man complaining at that moment because the last thing he needed was to complain knowing what we know now the last thing he needed is for someone to show up and say what the hell is going on here and then all this. A lot would have come out and you know it's a shame and it would come out because after he killed my father he proceeded to kill four or five other people and Shipman would almost certainly still be killing today if it weren't for his amateur attempt at fake the lady.
Grundy's will, but the big question remains why a doctor dedicated it to saving lives, murdering his patients. Those close to the case have their own theories. You might enjoy being in control and the ultimate power is a power over life and death. I can't think of anything else that would explain why he did it. I think it's simply a matter of convenience, but perhaps it was more convenient to get rid of a patient who was an uncomfortable patient by killing her than by trying to persuade her. committee of family doctors to transfer her to another general practitioner.
It's horrendous, isn't it horrible to think that that could happen, but clearly it did? I think a significant number of the people that dr. Shipman killed. It is possible that he killed him simply because he did not wish to continue caring for them for whatever reason.

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