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Top 30 Interview Questions - From a Recruiters Hiring Playbook

May 29, 2021
Top 30 Questions Hello everyone, this is Don Georgevich with Job Interview Tools. Have you ever gone to a job

interview

where you felt like you gave all the right answers, you felt like you did great, but you didn't get the job? I know; I also. It happens a lot to a lot of people. Let me tell you what happened. You didn't tell the

hiring

manager what they wanted to hear; is the single biggest reason. You see, they have their own

hiring

guide that tells them specific content to look for in their responses. And if you don't meet their guidelines, you're out;
top 30 interview questions   from a recruiters hiring playbook
It's as simple as that. So what I'm going to do in this video; Instead of telling you what to say, because that's not what this video is about, we'll dig into the top 30

interview

questions

. These are the most common interview

questions

employers will ask you in a job interview. But I'm not going to tell you what to say. I'll tell you what they're looking for. I'll tell you what a hiring manager, recruiter, or employer looks for in your answer. And then all you have to do is take that information and create your own answers based on your experience and you'll have a totally natural and genuine answer that will wow any employer.
top 30 interview questions   from a recruiters hiring playbook

More Interesting Facts About,

top 30 interview questions from a recruiters hiring playbook...

Now, before we get started, I want to give you the secret combination to success in interviews. Write this down; it is 38-7-55; That's how it is. And you're probably like, "Don, what the hell are you talking about? What are those numbers? Well, I'm going to tell you. Those are the three elements of communication in a job interview. You see, most people don't realize this, but your body is doing most of the communication; that's right. Your body, your posture is doing 55 percent of the communication in a job interview. 38 percent is related to voice and tone. So if you have a monotone voice like this, you get a zero there at 38 percent.
top 30 interview questions   from a recruiters hiring playbook
But if you reinforce that voice and speak very loudly and get your words out, then you are delivering at a much higher level. And then only 7 percent of their answer is related to the actual content. That's how it is; only 7 percent. So, write it down; 7-38-55. 7 percent related to content, 38 percent related to the voice and tone you use in an interview, and then 55 percent related to your body language. So, you want to have a good posture; you want to sit up straight, you want to keep those shoulders back. When you get into that stance, that position, that makes you feel more confident and then that makes your voice and your tone come out louder and clearer.
top 30 interview questions   from a recruiters hiring playbook
This is how you succeed. But I'm telling you, most people are so scared when they go to a job interview that they just sit like that and talk like that and have a really monotone voice. So, they get a 0 percent on tone 38 and they get a 0 on body language, 55 percent. So an interviewer just listens to the content and that's only 7 percent of the response. I did not invent these things. This is science. This is fully backed by science. Go find the rule, 7-38-55 on the internet. Learn more about body language; That's all I'm going to spend on it.
But what we're going to do is jump into the top 30 interview questions right now and I'll tell you exactly what employers are looking for in your answers. 1. So, the first one we have here; Tell me about you. Now this is one of the most common interview questions that are used. It's a good icebreaker question, but what an employer is looking for is to know about your journey throughout your career. They want to hear what got you interested in what you're doing. So if you're in finance, they want to know why you like finance, why you're passionate about finance, and where you're headed.
If you're in healthcare, they want to hear what you're passionate about in healthcare; maybe you like to help people, whatever. That's what they want to hear. So you don't want to just give them a bunch of blah blah blah, "I've done this and I've done that." Share your passion with them. Tell them what excited you, when he excited you and what you did about it and the journey he went through in his career to develop that passion. That is the best way to answer; �Tell me about yourself� because that is what they are looking for in your answer. 2.
This is a very popular one; Why is there a gap on your resume? Well, a lot of people, maybe they got fired, maybe they got laid off, whatever, they quit their job. So now they have a 3 or 6 month gap on the resume; sometimes more, 1 or 2 years is not that rare. So what does an employer want to hear when he looks at your resume and says, "Well Don, why do you have a 2-year gap on your resume?" Let me tell you what they want to hear. They want to know that you were doing something else to improve yourself while you were looking for a job.
They don't want to just hear that, "Oh, well, you know, nobody would hire me." They don't want to hear your bad luck story. They don't want to hear that you were caring for a sick loved one. They don't want to hear that the job market was just brutal and you couldn't find anything. They want to know what you were doing to improve while you were looking for a job. So maybe you went to some free seminars, maybe you did some training, maybe you read some books. But they want to hear that you were doing something to improve yourself related to your career or occupation instead of just sitting around watching TV and eating chips. 3.
What motivates you? Now, the best way to get motivated is to get excited about something. So if they ask you, "What drives you, Don?" tell them when you're passionate about something, that's all you need because you do it all. What an employer looks for is what excites you about your job. . Why are you excited? So the easiest way to answer this is to tell them, "I'm really excited about where I work because they have a clear vision of where they're going and that's what motivates me." When the company knows where it's going and its values ​​and mission are aligned with me, it makes me really excited to wake up every morning, get out of bed and go to work because I'm going to a beautiful place with beautiful people. people with a clear vision and a mission to help people or whatever our mission is...� or whatever your mission is.
This is how you answer that question. 4. Why are you applying for this position? Now, a lot of people will say, "Well, it's because I need the money." Because I need the job. Totally wrong answer. What you want to do is figure out what their core values ​​are. You can do it from their website. Find out what their core values ​​are, find out what their mission is, and then align with what they're doing; that's what they want to hear. So, let's say, for example, that you are applying for a job with a company that is in the recycling business.
Let them know that you have a deep passion for making the world a beautiful place by cleaning up all the trash that accumulates through recycling. Share with them your passion for a beautiful green planet. Let them know that their values ​​align with yours. And this is how you answer why you are applying for this position. It is because you are aligned with them. 5. Guide us through your resume. Now they don't want you to read your resume, they don't want you to look at it and just read it. What they really want is just a summary of your experience.
So the best place to start with this is at the very beginning and start with your education. And just say: "I went to such and such a school." These are some of the things I did. And don't spend a lot of time there; just briefly cover your school, cover a few grades, maybe a few clubs you were in. And then talk about what you did after college; the next job you had. And then any subsequent work up to the present. That is all. It is a simple question. That's all they want to hear. But they don't want you to read your resume.
Therefore, you should not look at him while answering this question. You should be able to do it from memory. I mean, it's your resume; Correct? It's all about you. You should be able to just talk to them. And you can even ask them, "Would you like me to start at the beginning or at the end?" or you can just tell them, "I'm going to start all over with college and then you can follow me." from there, and then briefly guide them. It shouldn't take more than a minute. 6. Why do you want to work here? The key to answering this question is to align with the direction of this company.
So, you have to find out. You may need to ask a few questions, you may want to do some research on the company. And what are their values? What is your mission? Where are they going? What do you want to do? And you want to align with where they're going. And by doing that, you'll see them as someone who can contribute to your overall mission, your projects, or whatever they're trying to do; align with them. That's what they're looking for in your answer. 7. Why are you the best person for the job? Now, for most people, that will hit them like a ton of bricks because they'll start to doubt themselves and end up giving a lackluster answer because they'll feel like they're not the best person.
But let me tell you; what an employer wants to hear is that you understand. So throughout the interview process, try to understand what their pains and problems are and what they are trying to do. So when they ask you this question, you can relate to it and say, "Well Mr. Employer, I understand what you're trying to do, I understand what your values ​​are, and these are a lot of things." that I have done I know how to do these things very well, perhaps better than anyone; I really do not know. But I'm very good at it.
This is the reason. Give them some examples of things you have done before that are related to what they are trying to do. That's what they want to hear. That's how you nail that question. 8. Where do you see yourself in five years? Now this is a growth oriented question. So if you just say, "I can see myself sitting here for the next five years until I figure out what I want to do." That's not what they want to hear. You want to align this question with the direction of the business. So you need to understand where the company is headed, what direction it's headed, and then talk about how you see yourself fitting into its future.
As simple as that; not too hard. 9. What interests you about this position? Don't just tell them, "I'm interested in a job" or "I need the money." Relate this to what the company is doing. What kind of projects are you doing? What kind of people are you helping? Whatever it is; What are your goals? What are your values? Align with what the company is doing. Do some research on the company; find out the kinds of things they have been active in. I mean, maybe they're only active in some charities, maybe they like to help certain people. You can tell I'm attracted to the kind of stuff you're doing and here's why.
Don't just say, "I like what you're doing." I think you are a great company. Explain why. What excites you about this company? Why are you passionate? You can't just say, "Well, I read that you guys are a great company." I think I would like to work there� Now, be more specific and tell them what really excites you about wanting to work there; wanting to contribute. Let them know that you can contribute in many different ways that will help support them and where they are headed. 10. Why are you a good candidate for this position? What they want to hear now is they want you to talk about your past experiences, your past education, the kinds of things you've done that are related to the kinds of things they're looking for.
So you need to get a lot of information about the position, the job description, what they are looking for and what are the goals for this position. And then use that in your response and say, "Well, I know you guys are trying to do this and that in this job and these are some of the things I've done." want to do and say, "I can help you do that." Now the question here is; why are you a good fit? Think about that for a minute. What makes you unique about yourself or the experiences you have make you perfect for this job compared to someone else?
I mean, sure, you may be able to do it. Yeah, yeah, I can figure it out, but that's not what you want to hear. They want to know what kinds of things you've done make you a good fit. So, talk about those things; relate your past experiences to what you are looking for. It's as simple as that. 11. Tell me about a time when you faced a difficult challenge. Now, this is a behavior issue. You want to answer this using the STAR format. You know, STAR (Situation, Task, Action and Results). So the first thing you want to do is talk about a situation you had where you experienced a challenge.
And then you want to talk about the action you took and what you did to resolve this issue. And then you want to close that with the result and tell them how it turned out. So you could relate this to anything, but this is a behavioral question and you want to use that specific STAR format of a situation you worked on, a task, and how it all turned out. So basically, they want to hear about one of your past experiences where the chips were down, things were tough, you weren'trunning and you had to get by, get by, save the day, whatever.
This is how you answer that question. Don't just tell them how you would handle a tough question or a tough challenge, but tell them how you've dealt with them; that's what they want to hear. 12. Why should we hire you? I guarantee you'll probably get this question, but it will most likely come near the end of the interview, after you've had a chance to build a rapport and are thinking you might be okay. So why should we hire you? Now, this is your chance to sell yourself. But you have to understand what they are looking for. You have to understand all the pains and problems they are experiencing or where they want to grow or what the mission is.
So you want to relate that to them. You want to tell why you feel you are a good fit for them and why you are going to help them. How are you going to help them grow? I mean, that's really the question; Why should we hire you? Anyone can do the job; maybe. Why can you do better? So why should we choose you over these five other people? Well, you don't know what those five other people can do. So you have to care about yourself and what you can do and what makes you unique. So, try to pick things that are unique about your experiences.
I used to do this too. When I interviewed for jobs and they asked me, "Why should we hire you, Don?" I'd say, "Well, because I can do this, this, and this," which met their main goals. And then there were some other things that he could do very well that weren't necessarily a requirement, but were nice to have. And so, I'll talk about those extra things as well. And so, I arrived as a complete package; It just didn't have what they were looking for, it had more of what they were looking for. So, it was like they were getting extra stuff for free.
This is how you answer that question. 13. What are your weaknesses? This one breaks everyone. You don't want to just walk in there and tell them you have a bad temper or whatever. The best way to answer this question is to talk about a weakness you had that you have already overcome and guide them through it. There are actually two ways to answer this. You could talk about a weakness that is not related to work and what you did to overcome it so that it is no longer a weakness. That way they can see the progression. That's what they really want in this answer.
They want to see progression; You had a problem, you fixed it, and now it's no longer a problem. You can also choose a problem related to your work. Maybe you are in sales and maybe you used to be a little nervous in front of customers and you have learned to overcome that and are now a superior salesperson; that's all they want to hear. Just explain to them a problem you had, what you did to us to solve it, and that it is no longer a problem. 14. Tell me about a moment when you went further. So what they're trying to get away from is you talking about your daily duties, because everyone likes to talk about what they do at a job.
Well, going above and beyond is going beyond your daily duties. So, don't tell them some silly story about how you do your job. Again, this is another behavior issue; situation, task, action and result. Now, the situation and task; those are one and the same. So, it is situation or task, action and results. So there are three parts to that behavior question. So, you want to talk about a time when maybe things were normal; everything was going well on a project and then something totally out of place and totally unexpected hit you. And maybe you had to do something, maybe you had to go communicate with a lot of people that you normally didn't have to do or maybe you had to fly somewhere or maybe you had to go out and give a presentation;
Whatever it was. Talk about something extraordinary; something you really had to go out and make a big difference or the project was going to fail; Whatever it was. It's okay. So don't talk about a job description or daily duty; talk about something extraordinary 15. Tell me about a time when you reached a goal. So what they really want to hear is that you set goals. Most people don't even set goals; they just show up and work. So, talk about how you set goals, talk about your process that you use to set goals, and then tell them how you applied that process to a project or something and how you worked toward that goal. 16.
Why did you leave your last job? Now, there are probably many reasons. I mean, maybe you got fired, maybe you got fired, maybe you just couldn't take it there and quit or maybe you just got bored there or maybe you got over it. But one of the best reasons why you left is that you were looking for a bigger challenge. That's really what they want to hear. They really don't want to hear that you got fired. But hey, if you got fired, just tell them; say it. I was fired from my last job because maybe I wasn't meeting my monthly quotas, or maybe I just wasn't meeting the level they needed me to be, or maybe they just eliminated the position.
But what the interviewer wants to hear is his reasons for moving from one job to another. And ideally, what they're looking for is that you have a growth mindset and that you're looking for more opportunities, more responsibilities. So don't lie about why you transitioned from a company. If you get fired, tell them you got fired. If you got fired, you got fired. But ideally, what they want to hear is why you're transitioning from one company to the next. And they expect you to say something like, "I just got over it and I was looking for more responsibilities and I couldn't get that there and I had more opportunities here." That's what they want to hear. 17. "What are your strengths?" or "What are your greatest strengths?" So this is another great opportunity for you to share what makes you so unique.
What are you really good at? Are you really good at leading? Are you good at designing? Are you good at managing people? You know, whatever. But the key here is that you want to relate it to what they're looking for. So you probably have a lot of strengths; many, many strengths (we all do), but you want to tie their strengths to what they're looking for. So take the job description and read it very, very carefully and get a good understanding of what they're looking for and then try to fit in there; like where can you really help?
Where can you best help? And those would be their greatest strengths. Relate them to them in the interview, but talk about the things they want to achieve and why you are a good fit and why your past experiences have prepared you for this like no one else. 18. What are you most proud of? Now let me tell you what you don't want to hear. They don't want to hear that you're a proud father of four children or anything like that. What they want to hear is how proud you were of the things you've done; your contributions to society perhaps, past a place you worked.
What are you most proud of? Where did you make the difference? What made the difference in someone's life, in a project or in a goal? What specifically? Why are you proud? what have you done And being proud could simply be, �I am so proud that I got my Masters; I got it from Stanford. That is the highlight of my life. You know, whatever. And it doesn't have to be super cool; It's something that means a lot to you. But keep it business or career related and not so much family, because they don't really want to hear how proud you are of a father or that you just gave birth to a new child.
I mean, those are great; Those are beautiful things. But that's not what they're looking for in the interview. So, keep it focused on your career. 19. Describe what you do at your current job. Now, don't give them a summary of all your daily tasks. Give them a summary of the things you do that are related to what they are looking for. In some cases, perhaps only 30 percent of what you do at your day job is related to what they are looking for someone to do at this job. So, just talk about that 30 percent or 50 or 10 or whatever number it is.
But talk about what it does, since it's related to what they're looking for. That's what they want to hear in your response. 20. What is your management style? Now, you are not going to ask this question of everyone; is a common question. But if you're going for a team leader, project management, or manager position, you'll be asked; What is your management style? What they are really testing is; Do you have a style? Have you really managed enough people? Have you been managing long enough in your career that you really have a management style? And whatever your style is, it's irrelevant.
I mean, if you're a micromanager or a hands-off manager, you're an open-door manager or whatever. But be genuine about what makes you a good manager and why you manage this way and why you like to manage this way. And give some examples. Explain to them some of your management exercises or some of your meetings and why you believe in your management method. And why it is effective and why it works for you. That's really what they want to hear. They don't really care what your actual style is, but they do want to hear the depth of your experience.
Because people who haven't managed before don't have a management style. So if I'm interviewing a manager and I ask, "What's your management style?" and you say, "Well, I don't know." That just tells me that you haven't managed. So, I want to hear what you've done, how you've done it, and why you like it, why you handle it that way, and why you think it's effective. 21. Tell me about a mistake you made. Now, they don't want to hear about a mistake you made at home. You want to keep this career related and you don't want to tell them that you accidentally put black toner where the blue toner was in the copier.
Give them something to chew. Give them a mistake you made that you wish you hadn't, but you know you screwed up and then what you did to fix it. What did you do to recover from that mistake? Because people are going to make mistakes. We all make mistakes, I make mistakes, but how do you recover from your mistakes? Do you make mistakes and leave them in other people's laps or deal with the problem? That's what they want to hear. So, explain to them a time when you made a mistake and the pressure was on, and then explain to them what you did to recover from your mistake and that everything was fine.
But again, that's a behavioral issue; situation or task, action and result. Walk them through a quick little scenario of how you did it. 22. What are you passionate about? Now, if you think about this, it's like, "Oh man, I'm passionate about a lot of things." So there are a couple of different ways you can go. I would like to align my answer with the values ​​of the company, their goals, their mission, whatever, and I like my passion to be consistent with theirs. I may be passionate about other things too and that's okay. But you should also be passionate about this company and what they are trying to do.
And what this is doing is eliminating people; This is a question to screen out candidates who are not aligned with your company culture. For example, let's say you're interviewing for a company that makes and sells pet supplies. If you are not passionate about animals, kittens, bunnies and dogs, then you are not aligned with the values ​​of this company and they will not be interested in you. But if you go to a company that makes pet supplies and things and you say, "I love animals." I have many animals. I have lots of cats and dogs and I love animals�� Now, you are aligning with their culture and that is what they are looking for.
Because when you're passionate about what they do, you're fundamentally aligned with the core values ​​and that's the kind of person they're looking for this job. Makes sense; Correct? That's pretty easy. 23. What do you know about our company? And you better know something. You should do some research on the company before you get there. I mean, unless you're a really big company like Amazon or Google or Microsoft, then it's pretty easy to get information on them. But for many of us, we're just interviewing for a smaller company that's relatively unknown. So you want to do some research.
You want to investigate that company in every way. Try to find articles that have been written about them; maybe the magazines have written a few articles about them or even the local newspapers. But do your research and try to find out things they've done or things they've been known for. Don't just say, "Well, I hear you guys are really good at making shoes." Go beyond that. Find out that maybe they are a company that makes shoes, but maybe they also donated a thousand pairs to some homeless shelters and you found out about that. So you can go in and say, 'Well, I know you guys really care about people.
And I know that you donated a thousand pairs of shoes to a homeless shelter in California. I think that's a beautiful thing and that's the kind of place I want to be; who really cares about society and other people. It's how you answer that question. 24. How did you find out about this job? Now this one is pretty easy. You can ask. Remember, like I said, just doquestions to help you make a decision about whether or not you want to work there. So for me, I want to know what the day-to-day responsibilities are. If day-to-day responsibilities are all this eight to 12 hour days, that doesn't interest me.
So, that disqualified that employer for me. So that's what these questions are. All of these questions that he needs to ask should be interview questions to qualify or disqualify this position or this company. And if you're just getting a lot of "No, no, no" or whatever is negative for you, then you're almost saying, "This is not a place I want to be" or "This is a place I want to be." because they're doing all the things that I want to do and I want to be a part of it. Either way, that's up to you, but that's how you ask those questions.
Alright, those are the top 30 job interview questions and what that employers are looking for in your answers. Now, before your next interview, grab a copy of The Complete Interview Answer Guide. This book has over 140 different questions that you can expect to be asked in any interview. I mean, I covered 30 questions you might be asked, 10 or 15 of those might depend on the interviewer, but this guide has over 140 questions, it has over 40 behavioral questions, so I go much deeper into how to answer those behavioral questions using the STAR method than mentioned one in the video We speak of a Situation or a Task and an Action and the Result.
This guide goes much deeper into that behavioral process (that competency interview) than in this video. It also covers all the interview questions that you are likely to be asked. I've had a few people buy this book saying, "Don asked me 80 to 90 percent of the questions in his guide." I've even had employers purchase my guide to use as their hiring procedures guide for hiring people. Now, this book is an ebook. You can download it from jobinterviewtools.com; I will put the link below. It's like 47 bucks. You can also get the hard copy; this physical version here. I'll mail it to you.
That is a different option. It also comes in audio and video. So if you like to learn by downloading audio tracks to your iPod or whatever and listening to them or watching videos, I've got that too. This is the only job interview guide on the market that comes in eBook, hardcopy, audio, and video formats. But more than anything, it will give you a much deeper insight into what employers are looking for and give you plenty of sample responses. So, I already told you what employers are looking for in this video, but this guide will tell you how to frame your answer.
So maybe you're struggling, maybe you understand what employers are looking for, and maybe you don't know how to frame your answers in a way that sounds good, sounds appealing, and resonates with an employer. This guide will show you how to do it. She will take it to the next level for you and just lay it all out. So, starting from the next interview you have, just reading this guide here; just an hour or two before your interview will connect all the dots for you and you will sound much more confident, much more connected to that employer at your next job interview.
And they're going to see a lot more of you than other employers in your previous interviews. Because you're probably here, watching this video today, because you've been on a few job interviews and maybe they didn't go well, maybe you've been on a lot of interviews, maybe you've been interviewing for six months. or a year and no one has hired you yet and you're really getting down and it hurts a bit. I understand. I mean, showing up for a job interview and when you go through interview after interview and they keep saying, "No, no, no." But one way to recover from that is to show up for an interview and be all you can be.
Be the best of yourself. be in perfect condition. Being in a perfect state of mind. Make sure you've done all the work, all your homework, all the preparation steps you could possibly do to prepare for the interview. So when you go in there, you're doing your best and you feel good about doing your best. Take it to that level. So whether you get hired or not, you feel inside that you did the best you could and no one can take that away from you. No one. That's how you win and that's how you build. So, every interview you attend; whether you get the job or not; learn something.
Learn a little from each interview. So if you fail four or five interviews, don't let that reflect on you. Because employers are fickle. Out of 10 employers, maybe three or four of them really had no interest in hiring you. And maybe that job was reserved for someone else. So just because you didn't get the offer, don't let that be a reflection of your skills, your skills, your experience, your passion. Because when you do; when you let those interviews reflect negatively on you, it hits you. And it hits you and it hits you and then you don't want to interview anymore.
And then you just show up and you just sit down and say, "Well, my name is Don and I'm here for a job interview." No, you have to be passionate about every interview you attend. Do you remember what we talked about at the beginning of this video? About the 7-38-55 rule? Body language; 55 percent You need to be alive. You must have a good posture, sit up straight, use your arms when you speak; to be alive. And then 38 percent; voice tone. Express yourself, state your words. Don't just sit there and talk like that; to be alive.
And then like I said, 7 percent is just content; just your words. So you could take some pretty lackluster responses and slice them with your body language, tones of voice, and inflection, and even the silliest responses will come to life and people will be excited that you're up there, using your hands. and your body and you're presenting yourself and they're attracted to that. I mean, who are you going to be attracted to; the person who sits there and talks like that or someone who is really full of life, bringing that room to life in exciting and passionate ways.
This is how you succeed. This is how you succeed in the interview. That's all I have for you today. I know this was a super long video; longer than ever, but I think it will help you a lot. So good luck on your next interview and I'll see you in the next video. Bye.

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