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This is Why You Suck at Guitar 18: You Don't Know the Major Scale!

May 29, 2021
You

know

kids, the late great Terry Pratchet once said, set a man on fire, keep him warm for a day, but set him on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life and it is with that thought in mind that in today's lesson . I'm going to give you some fuel to fan your own musical flames for life, so if you don't

know

the

major

scale

, you're in big trouble. I'm the VIN guy and that's why you

suck

at

guitar

. Hello kids, it's good. Uncle Ben, friend, one of the most important things any musician can do is learn the

major

scale

inside and out and that's one of those things that I tell more and more, you know, to metal-oriented students, I cringe a little because that's the doremi fossil happy sound scale that we never really use in metal, but believe me, every time you learn the major scale, you're essentially learning the entire genome you know, the DNA strand of everything you know. you have to know in Western music, typically in music theory, always.
this is why you suck at guitar 18 you don t know the major scale
We are talking about other scales or modes of any kind. We generally talk about them in terms of how they differ from the major scale. You know it's like a major scale, but with

this

little change, every time you learn the major scale. We're learning the default template for every other scale on the planet, so with that said, don't let the fact that it's the happy-sounding one deter you from taking the time to learn and understand it thoroughly, it's the essential component. of everything we do in Western music, so today's lesson is worth your time. I'm going to show you five different ways I learned to play the major scale over the years that helped me fully understand and visualize it around the world. the entire fretboard of the

guitar

,

this

is extremely useful stuff, or any musician of any level or style of experience can add to their musical toolbox.
this is why you suck at guitar 18 you don t know the major scale

More Interesting Facts About,

this is why you suck at guitar 18 you don t know the major scale...

Tabs and tabs for this lesson are available on my Instagram page at Ben eller guitars, just search for this, that's why you

suck

. on guitar 18, find and follow them, downloadable tabs, backing tracks, bonus lessons and more, available for everyone to support my channel on my patreon page at patreon.com slash bin eller guitars, you can visit the page by clicking the link of the video. description find the teardrop that best suits you and start reaping the benefits today thanks number-one linear learn to play the major scale from left to right on a single string, as I just said, there is one of the most crucial parts of learning and Understanding the major scale very well, I see that the problem is that every time you learn scales in those big vertical boxes, it can hide from you what is happening within that scale, as to how far apart the notes are and what is the boss. and things like that, but every time you play it from left to right like that, you can really see how far apart each note is on that scale and start to figure out what's driving it in all the examples in today's lesson that I'm going to see.
this is why you suck at guitar 18 you don t know the major scale
They'll use a as the root note for all of these scales, they'll use different notes all over the board here, so the major scale is simply made up of a series of full steps and half steps, the full steps are these two fret intervals and half steps are the Steps are small fret intervals and the major scale again, any major scale, whether it's an A or B scale or whatever, is a set pattern of steps and halftones and is very easy to learn, so I'll start here. the second fret string in RN a root note. I'm going to play a major scale by playing the order of the steps and semitones that go into a major scale that is written in stone and is the same for all the major scales in the world.
this is why you suck at guitar 18 you don t know the major scale
Whether it's an F major scale or a D major scale or whatever, this series of steps and semitones is always the same and it's easier to remember to start over with the root note. I am using a work of two full steps followed by a half. then play three whole steps followed by a half ok so again that's the route whole step whole step half step then your three whole hip steps followed by a half now after the last half step we just did you finish again on the same note that started just an octave higher a scale is not like a straight line and a scale is more like a circle or a race track, you know where as soon as you cross the finish line you are on your next lap again, you know then you do that series of two and a half holes, three holes in the middle, you end up right where you started, which means you could potentially go to the Reno stem and get up, step halfway and again you're back on your root note , so you can restart that whole series there root note step step half step step and you know you run out of frets after that, but it could go on to infinity two steps have three steps half repeat this works from any root note I could play a to different Take note as the high E string on my 5th fret and play that same series of step step half step step half step and you'll get the same results.
Note that as I went along I wasn't talking about fret numbers or anything like that. I'm not going to 4 6 7 9 11 whatever. I think that way of learning is like trying to memorize the phone book or something, it's just worthless, yeah, you can look here and memorize a scale is 2 4 6 7 or whatever, but as soon as you change. strings, that is no longer true and as soon as you try to play a different scale, that is no longer true, this line has a series of steps and semitones and makes the numbers on the fretboard irrelevant. I really like learning and illustrating major scales this way because again when you play a scale like this vertically it's much harder to see that you're going to the window step step half step step step then your own window renewed again step step half and so on it's much harder to see that every time you're playing It's this way, every time you do it through a single string like that, it's much clearer to see great for all your favorite inve style one string rippers up to number two, the standard way, so I think the first way I learned to play a major string.
The scale was using what we call a standard form scale pattern. Standard-form scale patterns like this are useful because they are simply carried out on four frets, meaning they are fairly easy to play anywhere on the fretboard and in any key. It is quite easy to visualize them. they're nice little square patterns now, as we get through this, I'm going to talk about fingering numbers right here that way again, don't get too attached to the fret you're on, but just think about one finger per fret type. of mentality the first finger will play this fret the second finger is responsible for all the notes on that fret the third finger is on that fret the fourth finger is on that fret and so on, once again I will start with my root note as the fifth fret on my E string goes down and we have to play that with my second finger, so again, as I say this, I'm not talking about fret numbers, I'm talking about finger numbers, okay, I'll play two fours on the next string.
I'm going to play 1 2 4 next I'm going to play one, three, four, the same thing again 1 3 4 on the B string here play the same thing you played on the low E 2 then 4 and finally on the high I'm going to play 1 2 okay, so that's two four one two four three four two four one two as you play that pattern, you're still playing the same series of two steps, half of the three steps, half that we played every time we learned string one again, it's a It's a little bit harder to see, but as you go, you keep doing the same thing, which means that after you play the root notes, go down, step, step, step, this is the root note again.
You know you'll notice that after every seven notes We're back where you started once again on the root note, so as you go through this, think that it's not just this one, that's the route, you know every seven notes you'll go through the root note again, it's important for a lot of different things. reasons root two three four five six seven root two three four five six seven root is kind of like they say they're like military personnel and police officers and things like that are trained to know where all the exits are in a room, you know?
I think every guitarist should know where the root notes are and their scale patterns. It's really useful and relevant to know, especially if you're playing on them, like say an A chord, and you're using this major scale to be able to play a lick where you land on that root or maybe one of the other chord tones is always a good idea just because you're in the scale and in the key it's not necessarily enough, you need to stick the takedown and land on a note that's in the chord you're playing at the time, standard form scale patterns are great because they're easy of visualizing and just think about the fingering combination of two four one two four one three four and so on they are also great skill builders if you are looking to develop, you know your skills with the fingers of your hand, here you also like these because it is easy to visualize the shape of a chord on them, which again means more cool tones we can land on every time we solo against a chord like for example, every time you play a normal major barre chord you end up with five seven seven six five five right, it's very easy to visualize the shape of the chord hiding inside five seven seven six five five, it's all hidden right there in the scale, so it can give you a clue as to some interesting notes that you can play on while doing a solo against an a chord while using an a scale any of the ones you're going to work with because they're right there in the chord shape, one thing that Many people already know is that anything you play in a guitarist position you can play the same thing. on 12 frets higher, so if this scale pattern works on the fifth fret like we're doing now if I play on 12 frets higher on the 17th, it will work here too, but the problem that many of us have is that we end up with these big separate islands of things.
I know you know it's like here's the scale pattern. I know it's the same down here. scale pattern again an octave higher, but in the middle of those two there's kind of a no man's land, you know what I mean, but this is where you can use what you learned in the first part of the lesson with the scale linear major. scale to connect those two things anywhere you find a root note again knowing where the root notes aren't is very important so I'm going to color them in all the charts anywhere you find that root note you can start that linear sequence of two and a half holes three holes in half and connect your islands of information check it out yeah, that's a root note right there right there is one so let's just walk that tense root note step step half step step half and now I'm up on this one. position 17 note chart.
I don't know, would you do that too because here's a root note step step half step step half step and I'm just connecting these two different points on the neck new murder I' see the pocket octave shape, Well, essentially, this shape is the top of the scale pattern you just learned, only we're going to learn how to apply it on each set of strings, in each scale you learn, you should be able to play a simple, small, pocket-sized, shape of an octave. I'll tell you why in a second, but essentially what we're doing is that way we learned a second ago where we start on the root note with our second finger and play. two two four one two four one two three four now, learning how you can apply that shape to each other, in this case on the neck, is going to be extremely important, but basically the cool thing is that every time you learn these little one octave tones, we can put them on any set of strings and apply them there, this is really important because a lot of guitarists only learn scale shapes from the low E string and can only think of starting that scale if it starts from the low E and that's a big problem. for a lot of players that can really hold you back, so whenever you learn how to use these little pocket octave shapes all over the neck, that means you should be able to smell the root notes for any scale on any string. you happen to be close at that point, not always relying here on just the low E string, okay, two four one two four one two three four, now you can put that on another A and play exactly the same pattern, let's say the twelfth fret here on the a string which is an a note and check it out you can play two four one two four one two three four and it's the same scale okay now let's put it here on the seventh fret of the D string this is where we'll meet Some problems due to guitar tuning, okay, so if you try to play the same pattern you've been playing on four one two four one two three four, you'll get into that dangerous tone that I call accidentalHoldsworth Sunny as Holdsworth is great, obviously. but only when you mean: if you're trying to play just a nice major chord and you're playing the long scale form which gets a little dangerous because of the tuning of the guitar which is mostly fourths but with this third in between on the strings G and B, you essentially always have to alter the shapes every time they cross over B.
Notice that our first shape and our second shape looked and felt identical, it's because they didn't cross the stupid B rope every time I cross. the B we have to go up one fret to accommodate that weird thirds tuning that happens between G and B, so mind you, you're still going to play in four starting here from the seventh fret D up to four one two four but when it's time to go one two three four go up one fret one three four okay two four one two four go up the string yeah one three four is a pain but learn to live with it or be like Tomquail and tune up the fourths so you don't have to deal with it.
We can also start the scale pattern from the two on the G string, the a note we started with on a linear scale, just here again look at this if you play. the usual way of two four one two four one three four definitely accidental Holdworth territory again so we have to change the way we play this because again the B string will immediately move to wherever it gets there so I usually play it So. to start with two four I will start with one and three because the next part of the scale will go one two four one three four you have a nice rule down here, nothing goes up or jumps a fret one three one two four one three four look at these scales in one octave is very important and it will really free up a lot of you know space in your brain so that you can play wherever you are on the neck while you're improvising or whatever and not just to try to think about what you know, the gigantic six-string scale that you're on when you're playing here on the lower strings.
You know there's no need to load all this data when I'm down here. I'll give you an example, let's say I was playing some cool, jazzy chord changes that change key or something like maybe a major seven like a C major setting, now there are a lot of guitarists that just know you know the big ones. shapes they have. thinking about playing a scale against a major seventh chord and then when it's time to play C major seven and they play the C major scale, they have to start thinking about when to jump here to the number eight fret because I know there's a C note Right here at the eighth fret of the low E string, a lot of guitarists are getting into the habit of switching from this big box to this big box back and forth and that sucks, but the good thing is that if you know play these octave pocket scale patterns, you can play the ball where your kid is, I mean, if I'm playing it's the major seven, I'm using the major scale, I could do something like that again and another burrito, so let's say it's time to go to the C scale, well you can see position wise, I'm nowhere near the starting point of that C scale here at the 8th fret, so how about instead I just I find this note of C that is here at the number 5 fret of the G string? a technically viable root note, so I'm going to use that one octave scale pattern there again adjusting the tuning 1 3 1 2 4 1 3 4 again from this note C, well, I think about this C, I'm not even close to that, I'm closer to this note C, this is how I'm going to put that scale starting so that again I can play something like a scale to see the actual scale, a receipt again really great to learn that there is an octave scale pattern when you play over difficult chord changes and the cool.
The thing is, it's really easy to string them together from root to root note and it makes these nice little pockets of scales all over the neck delight number four crushers, three notes per string, oh yeah, the three notes per string pattern. scale, one of my absolute favorites and the most used things in my bag of tricks. These scale patterns are great for making cool sequences. You know, Paul Gilbert-style burner licks are great too - they cover a lot of sonic territory that covers more. range than the standard form scale pattern that we did and the other great thing is that there is a uniform number of notes per free string on each string a little more predictable: selections and the standard form ones that are like two notes, three notes, three notes. three notes two notes two notes which can be quite difficult to negotiate with the pig when there are the same number of notes on each string it becomes a little more predictable.
Once again I'll start here from the fifth fret of the low E string. and this is what we're going to do, we're going to play five, seven and nine, isn't that a great stretch? Now you'll notice that I played the five with my first finger, the seven with my second finger, and the nine with my fourth finger. Many top players, when they are new to these forms, like to do it this way and play one, three, four. It's very rare to see guys who are really good at it. Paul Gilbert doesn't, but Paul Gilbert has giant hands and I don't.
Basically, this is the idea, the reason why you should touch them like one, two, four is because anatomically, what's easier to do is make these two fingers straighten or spread them apart, if you like 99% of the human beings, this is It's an easier stretch than this, so I make these guys do the hard work and I make this an easy job, so five seven nine repeat the same thing on the next string five seven nine, the next thing you have to do is go up one fret. with your index finger and change to this way play six seven nine with your fingers one two four thanks again I raise it one fret with my index finger just like that with the same on the next string okay, after this what you have to do is Go up another fret with your first finger, so think that every time you change shape, go up one fret and you have to play seven nine ten on these frets using fingers one, three, four and then play the same thing on high. , OK?
So now this is what happens with this scale pattern. I want to remind you that this goes beyond the route. Okay, remember I said a second ago that every seven notes you end up back on the root 2 3 4 5 6 7 root note. 2 3 4 5 6 7 root 2 3 4 you will notice that the scale pattern ends on the 4th note of this scale, not the root ok this is something I see I call finish line syndrome a lot and guitarists think that the highest note in the scale pattern is somehow significant because it's the last note, it's the finish line, so I've heard many times that you guys will use these scale patterns and you'll get to that Highness note and you'll land on it, but that's not always necessarily a good note to play again, it's not enough that it's in the scale or in the key, it also has to work with the chord you're playing against, so again, if you're playing against a sound of the A major and you're using this 3 number string on a major scale and you land on that note against an A chord, it doesn't exactly work, does it?
You would be much better off thinking about trying to trace your way back to one of the roots or back to one. Of the other chord tones, the note C sharp and ena are also in that chord, but it's always good to know where those roots are, guys, they are the exit doors in the scale, always know where those roots are, so while practice through these, really any of these scaling patterns I always recommend not just stopping at the top, driving that car somewhere, taking it back to your root, you know, don't be content with just getting to the top because It's the highest note, taking it back to notice that you would really do it. you want to land if you're playing against that chord, three note per string scale patterns are great for letting you know incredibly fast sequences of licks like Paul Gilbert does and a lot of times they're really simple, it's like instead of playing three notes and then move to the next note in the scale play those three notes and then play them again to get six notes one two three four five six because the next string also has three notes you can do it there too one two three four five six one two, three , four, so on, it's easy to make these nice little looped chains that you just applied to each rope.
Look, I'm reviewing that I'm just applying the same idea. The ring set View, then this one, this one, look at this one, Paul Gilbert. intense rock videos on YouTube, effects you know, pink, background and so on, it's really worth watching any of Paul Gilbert's lessons on YouTube to capture as many of those cool scale sequences that work with string scales as you can. notes per string, so whenever I think of four no, restoring scale patterns, I think of Shredder Knights like Rusty, who used them to burn at incredible speed across the fretboard, obviously, as you can see, you cover a ton of sonic terrain every time you play these four notes. four string scale patterns.
I would say one of the most useful things about them is the fact that not only are there the same number of notes per string, but it's an even number which is really important if you're looking to increase the top level. The uniformity of the speed of selection of the notes per string, especially when they are even numbers, is always easier than a random selection, you know, the dispersion of notes on each string, see when you play the three notes per string, one because They are odd numbers, the selection shifts each string up. down up down up down up that could be really tricky at high speeds, but anything you play four notes per string is just down up down on each string down down repeat down up down up so everything is the same for your playing hand if We're looking to make some really quick alternative picks on these scales, now the way guys like Rusty use them, as I understand it, is to always play the first note on the string, the second note with the first finger and the third note with the second finger. with the third finger fourth note with the fourth finger so it doesn't matter what the spacing of the notes is on that particular string I guess it would be helpful for you to know what playing straight through a scale is if you were doing that I think playing straight through through a scale that was the most boring thing you could ever do, you know, you're just trying to think of which of your favorite solos features a guy playing straight through a scale that you know, without going back or changing his phrasing or anything but just going straight through the scale sounds like you're practicing in the middle of the solo, which is boring anyway, so I don't really use that kind of fingering, usually the way I use them is by using my little finger and switching up, so I start off feeling like I'm playing a three note per string scale like five seven nine using that two for the fingering that we use and then for the next note I'm just going to lift my pinky finger to the right. like that again, you don't have to do it that way if you don't want to, but that's how it works for me now.
I'm going to play this year about playing five seven nine and then ten, okay, next I'm going to string here instead seven nine eleven okay now because we're putting four notes on each string you've already played a full octave of this scale. 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 you can always know where those root notes are later. When you get to that point, what we're going to do is continue with that 2 full step, half step, 3 full step and half step pattern that we learned initially, we'll play the D string here at 9, eleven, twelve and fourteen, then we'll go to the G and play 11 13 14 16, so it's 11 and so far they were going to be in play 14 15 17 19 and lastly the high E string here we're going to play 16 17 19 21, so that's a lot of notes, but as you can see it covers 100 notes 2 3 4 octaves there, so you cover a ton of ground, great for when you want to move from the low end of the mast to the top end at lunge speed, but then again, I rarely use them alone. to play straight through a scale, I'll use them with more blended phrases, you know, ending on a root note or third or fifth or whatever else you want to do and again, I'd really like to take that home with you. no matter what shape you're using, whether it's the standard shape for another purse string, whatever you're doing at the end of the day, it's all root note, two steps, half, three steps, half back at the beginning , regardless of the forms.
You can disguise that at times, but that's always what happens on any major scale, so yes, the standard linear form is Ford's prenuptial restraint of partnerships and gigantic top rope shakes. I encourage you to try to combine these ideas as much as possible. with one of those pocket Octus with transition to linear, then maybe that will get you into a big first ring shape of three networks that you know or whatever, mix and match them in every possible way and you know if you want to get some benefitmusical. Also do yourself a favor and instead of practicing these scales and shapes with a metronome, find a backing track here on YouTube, simply write down a major backing track, or if you're working on your F scales, write down a major backing track.
F major or whatever, there's tons of good high-quality material you can use to practice this and, again, it's all recorded with a metronome, guys, when you play with a backing track, you're still playing with a metronome, you know , you just get the added musical advantage of hearing where those root notes are and where the important chord tones are and things like that while you're playing these scales and after having a really good understanding of how that scale is constructed as to where the first one is. note, the second, the third and the fourth note fifth note six notes seventh note and first note It is very easy to learn other scales because, as I said in the introduction, we describe all these other scales based on how they differ from the major scale itself, that is the default template. basic component of all music, so let's say you want to learn something that sounds like it's a completely different scale, like the melodic minor scale, which can seem intimidating, like you're learning a completely different language, but the thing is that when you compare it with the major scale, which again always starts with the major scale, when you compare it with the major scale, you will find that it is like a major scale only with a flat note and a third, okay, so take everything that you know about the major scale clearly visualize those patterns of things that we talked about and just lower the third note and that's it so you can take your linear thing that you know one, two, three, four, five, six, seven notes long, to the right, and just make the third, a lower note, one, two and not three, but a flattened three, keep all the other notes the same so that the fourth note, fifth note, six notes, seventh note, first note be anyway, just flatten out that third and suddenly you're playing with a whole new scale just using the knowledge of what you already have about the major scale as a basis.
Thank you all so much for tuning in to this super-sized lesson that should give you You're enough to chew on for a while. Thanks so much for looking. Make sure to like this video, subscribe, and hit the bell to get notified every time I put up another slice of fried gold for you guys right here on my channel. Can follow me. on instagram at Ben eller guitars facebook at facebook.com/ at slash uncle ben eller if you want to support my channel check out my patreon page at patreon.com slash and Benelli guitars let me know in the comments section below if you want.
I'd like to see a similar video like this, just based on a different scale, like maybe the minor scale or something, and I'll cover it someday in the future. Well guys, it's been fun as always, but it's time to get away from the computer and let's make some music, let's click on it more

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