YTread Logo
YTread Logo

The Wide Open: New Mexico Antelope | S3E08 | MeatEater

Jun 05, 2021
On this hunt I'm heading into the late summer furnace of New Mexico to hunt

antelope

with my friend Cody Lujan, a man whose ancestry in this region dates back to the time of the conquistadors. You can't just shoot bullets from those edges like to me I'm Stephen Runella, hunting isn't just about chasing an animal, it's about who we are and what we're made of I live to hunt and I hunt to live I'm a meat eater, right? what do you think that is? two miles yeah easy but that's what I like if you can see them from two miles away let's go up keep an eye on it it's the end of August and I'm in the far northeast of New Mexico where the rocky mountains fade away towards the huge ones.
the wide open new mexico antelope s3e08 meateater
American interior plains my hunting partner cody lujan and i are on a private cattle ranch in search of

antelope

or american pronghorn. They are the second fastest land animal on the planet, after the African cheetahs, much faster than any of their natural predators. They have an incredible view. and they are the only horned animal that sheds its horns. They are a little strange and very beautiful. What I love about these New Mexico antelopes is that they are very territorial. Here we will find them even if we win a lot of money. From one place you return the next morning and most of the time they return to where you left them.
the wide open new mexico antelope s3e08 meateater

More Interesting Facts About,

the wide open new mexico antelope s3e08 meateater...

It's interesting how like-minded people find each other. Cody and I met through a mutual friend and immediately knew we had to go hunting. Together, he has a deep personal and family history in some of the most rugged and iconic places in the Western United States and has a hunting resume that rivals the best of them. He is a real eater of me and hunts with respect, reverence and trust, neither of us are big on the truck. hunting, we parked at the edge of a large pasture and emerged with enough water for the day. I haven't seen it yet.
the wide open new mexico antelope s3e08 meateater
Oh, there it is. You just come out when we get close to the first male. I tell Cody that he has to take the first shot. after all, this is his place, this buck looked like a great buck, we're going to go see it, but we're not feeling it yet, but you might start to feel it very quickly. I could jump on that top and really feel it. yes it feels good we will do it if not we will go until it feels good someone was telling me don't pass up one on the first day you would love to have on the last day I think those are wise words of wisdom we always schedule our hunt to catch the rut at a time when the bucks are busy prowling the planes looking for females, they are so desperate for companionship that they actually approach humans in the hope of finding love, wait, wait, like This male that comes comes to see us in the hope of being lucky at this distance, the male cannot rule out that we could be a group of females.
the wide open new mexico antelope s3e08 meateater
He hasn't yet stomped his legs or ruffled the hair on his back so as not to scare you. I'll watch this guy get scared, he'll pull all the hair out of his butt and when they do, they actually emit like a pheromone, the other animal can smell the smell of these insects from a mile away, this is going to sound weird, but These bucks smell like fried acorn chips, it's the strangest thing, man, he's definitely looking for company, Steve, he has no idea what we are, he's got his romp

wide

ned, is he a little scared now?
Yeah, if you're going to shoot him, I would. I don't know, man, I'm just not feeling it, he's getting all regal now, man, what you say, Steve? Let's see a little more. Yes, despite being a private ranch, this environment is not at all easy to hunt. Midday temperatures here approach 100 degrees. and aside from an extinct volcano on the edge of the property, it is almost completely flat, with no shade and very little topography that one can use to hide. I have hunted quite a bit of antelope, but always on

open

access land where there is always a lot of pressure from other hunters, you never get the sense that they are behaving normally, and although I always pride myself on hunting on public lands, I couldn't turn down the opportunity to hunt on private land where antelope act like antelope.
So I can hardly believe it when we see another deer walking directly toward us, something that would rarely happen on

open

access land with a lot of game. It's 3 10. I'll look at it through the viewfinder. It's a good insect. It's a real one. good money, good hitman, that's wild, these lonely bucks like to see that movement and they just come like you see with the caribou a lot of times, you know they'll see you and think you need to be careful, man I've never seen an antelope like that. We're so carefree that we assume it could be another antelope, right?
And you know what it means to me that this assumption that another antelope is wild, these animals are not harassed, they are not pushed. They're not, they don't know what humans are, you know, and I think that's a testament to this place we're in now. These are wild. These animals are really wild. If you give me a second, one thing. What I appreciate about Cody is his almost spiritual connection to the animals he hunts. He conveys a sense of honesty, reverence and curiosity, almost a kind of mysticism. Okay, I'm really very grateful to this animal man.
This is going to feed my family. It's mid afternoon. and it's very hot, we need to chill this meat immediately and we have a long walk back to Cody's house. Oh, the nice thing about hunting with a local is getting the chance to try the local cuisine, and it turns out that Cody's dad, Harold, has offered. to make us a batch of his red chili antelope tacos when we get back to the ranch, so your old man just turns around ready for whatever he's on the go, we're a couple hours away from where he found himself.
Always be fishing ready to make some margaritas and tacos. You don't care when he gets there, not as long as he's part of someone's hunting or fishing camp, he's happy to be there, man, Harold, what's up? Hi Steve, I appreciate you agreeing. all dressed up this is a professional looking suit you have here let's make some antelope tacos yes yes now in New Mexico everyone cooks their own style but this is the traditional style my mom taught me. This is New Mexico red chili now. The key to New Mexico red chili is the chili that is grown in the actual land.
The chili is not that it is so spicy, it is the flavor. Watching Harold cook, I know I'm in for a treat. First brown the fresh antelope loin and oil. then add a little flour as a roux then comes the chili, this is coming out pretty good actually I don't know if it will taste good but it looks good just the way it looks ok try that now it has a subtle flavor. You know what I mean, it's not like an overwhelming man, that's the idea yeah, that's what we're looking for. This whole idea is not yes, it's not just super sexy, you know, no, that's it, you're not, you're not, the whole thing is no Look who has the hottest chili.
Oh, they are so pretty. Antelope tacos, ma'am, that's the best. Thank you. It's a pleasure. One of the things I enjoy is cooking traditional New Mexican food. It is a pleasure for me first thing in the morning we are back on the plains. It's my turn to get a buck and I hope to find a nice mature animal. There's a property line right here. There's a lot of antelope action across that boundary, but they look like it. move back and forth a little bit, so let's go up and see all this stuff, maybe camp out on some high points for a while and see what we can learn by moving around, it doesn't take long to spot one.
They're everywhere, but we're heading toward the sun and open terrain with ideal conditions for getting caught, so we decided to make a

wide

turn and approach it from a different direction. The first male we saw surrounded us and now here he is. Walking across this floor, I guarantee we could make up for that, go up that fence line, take down a couple hundred yards if I make that shot right now, you know he's on that horizon, there's a railroad track and cattle, and God He knows that by going behind him, you can. I'm not just throwing bullets off those edges like that, I decided to move along the fence to see if I can get a better angle while Cody stays behind to keep movement to a minimum as I get to the fence. , I can say it.
If the landscape just isn't on my side, I cross to see if I can get a better angle, but it still doesn't look good when I was talking about not taking that photo, I wasn't even aware of that, but look at the line of houses, farm yard, well that's a good way to waste the best part of your last day, buddy, what happened, the team shot him a box of shells, but every shot I got, he was right on the horizon, damn like they know they can't hold on. That shot seems perfect now, but it's like it never had a background.
Well, it's a good thing you didn't shoot. It's disappointing, but when you're hunting you have to consider the consequences of your actions on this flat terrain where the bullet can go. a long way to unknown places plus we have all day and there will be other opportunities, sure enough, around noon we spot another deer and track it at a safe distance for a while until it lies down on the opposite side of a rise and beyond. a herd of cattle that gives us perfect cover in case the buck stops and comes back over the hill and into view when the scattered cows are exposed unless the buck stays in bed.
I trust my luck and hope that it does and I keep moving forward. Pats I'm on my way here again Cody stays behind as I approach carefully. I have his position marked according to a lone tree, so I plan my actions using that as a guide once I'm close enough to the buck. They might catch a glimpse of me approaching the top. I begin to crawl on all fours. The deer is still in bed, oblivious to the threat. Some people disdain shooting animals in bed as if it were unethical. I say that approaching an animal in bed is the result of skillful action. and the situation must be honored as such, you earn the moment you keep it, it's a dandy, a beautiful, beautiful animal, man, thanks for traveling around me, man, hey, thanks for walking with me and sharing the hunt with me .
As I start to gut him, Cody rips his head off to get to the truck, it's still over 90 degrees here so it's imperative that we get this animal out of the sun before he starts to go bad. I can lie, Steve. It had the blast of air conditioning that you should have. He left it in an act of solidarity with the journey coming to an end. Cody offers to cook a camp version of one of his favorite dishes, antelope with roasted chiles and blue cheese, so that's the real chili hatch. This is the real McCoy. or the real sanchez whatever you want to call him, but this is here man, so what is hatch a town?
Hatch is a town in southern New Mexico, right on the banks of the Rio Grande, and you know everyone there is growing chili peppers. everyone is growing chiles man it's a big deal they have a big festival and you know it has to be certified hatch green chile they are the most sought after copycat chiles you can find I think they are great and we eat green chile. down here in all this is as important to us as our fish and meat. I like the medium mild flavor like my dad likes. We look for flavor, yes, a little spicy, but some good flavor.
I'm going to smash them, okay that looks good, you gotta love a guy walking around with a travel size spice kit. You can see New Mexico, some commonalities here, garlic chili, so let's say a guy doesn't have access to Hatch Valley. Where, how does he get it? Go online and they'll actually ship it, they'll roast it, they'll put it on ice and we'll deliver it to you overnight, really, yeah, let's grab a couple of dishes that look pretty nice, I've never been. shy of my belief that hunters have the potential to eat better than anyone else because we own our ingredients through a pact that has been written in dirt and blood, we earn them by applying our skills through hard work and determination and we use them honoring the traditions and lessons left by those who came before us the details of these traditions are not as important as the simple fact of honoring the traditions themselves the key to eating game well is not so much the fine details or whether you have incubated chiles and blue cheese or just a full can of cream of mushroom soup poured over a crock pot of squirrels.
Instead, it comes down to approaching food with gratitude and respect—that's what makes a meal truly memorable.

If you have any copyright issue, please Contact