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The Show Must Go On - Andrew Carruthers - Fringe and Face Framing - 5PM EDT

Feb 23, 2022
Let's be interactive and create a community, whether it's through live education or maybe through social media, we're always trying to make a personal connection with you, the learner, we're teaching things that we know can be used behind the chair and it's not about being flashy it's not about being complicated it's about building community hey y'all this is Andrew Carruthers director of education for Sambia once again from my segment a second segment of the day we I'll ask you to forgive me a little in this segment because I was behind the scenes operating like the digital stuff that happens behind the scenes.
the show must go on   andrew carruthers   fringe and face framing   5pm edt
I feel like I'm a little fried so I might slur my words a bit during this segment but I promise I'll do my best and make sure we get as much as we can and today so this segment is all about

face

framing

and the bangs, and I have a couple of my girlfriends here surrounding me, let's start with some

face

framing

content first. from different perspectives two different types of hair either finer hair thicker hair different densities different approaches to creating really beautiful face framing then we'll dig into some of the

fringe

concepts see how many different topics we can touch on and from Of course, as always, be sure to put your question pool in there, anything we can answer, of course, we'll do our best to do so today or in this segment again.
the show must go on   andrew carruthers   fringe and face framing   5pm edt

More Interesting Facts About,

the show must go on andrew carruthers fringe and face framing 5pm edt...

Lydia, yes Lydia and a cosmic VIP top our Chicago otologist membership which also gives you the chance to get into ApS next year for three full days which is great so all you do is follow the instructions on the screen and you can win one of Honestly, this is not to give you too much of a sales pitch, but I think what's really important, the reason we're very specifically with a pivot point, is I don't think you guys know how crazy is the game of hair trading. If you're buying cheap extensions, cheap mannequin heads, things like that, it could be coming from some places that I guarantee you don't want to support, we're talking like it's some kind of slave labor and really ugly manufacturing conditions.
the show must go on   andrew carruthers   fringe and face framing   5pm edt
So the reason we specifically partner with Pivot Points is that they have an S 8000 certification, so the certification ensures that the people creating the mannequin heads and the hair itself are ethically sourced. People receive fair wages. Their working conditions are good. so if you're buying mannequin heads, if you're buying hair extensions, wigs, anything like that, check out where those things are made and where the hair comes from because like I said, I think he'd be really sad if he knew where some of those things are. this stuff is ethically sourced stuff is all i have to say about it and even if you dont win lydia you can buy lydia and all the pivot point mannequin heads on their website and they are giving everyone who are coming to the

show

this weekend amazing discounts just stop by the points stop and then there is a banner you click on and it will take you to your price great awesome ok come on let's get into this because we have a lot to cover up so when we talk about face framing and when we talk about different faces raining of course even these haircuts are longer and shaggy even if there are actual bangs there are still these face framing accents n around the edges and again there are so many different ways that we can approach this type of haircut so first thing I want to share with you and if you are at home working with your mannequin heads that is awesome.
the show must go on   andrew carruthers   fringe and face framing   5pm edt
We're going to have some really simple things for you to try in this particular segment, so while you're working, the first thing we're going to talk about is working with very fine hair because especially thin, fine hair that doesn't have a lot of density, can be really challenging especially if they bring you images that have a cool defined texture because with thinner or finer hair if we start doing what we normally do with face framing you know we start to elevate doing a lot of the face layers from franken when it falls back to natural fall it can get very dim wait a second i realized this is in my pocket and this is actually the communication for my wife he is there driving them driving the equipment so i have to get a big thank you to my wife Michelle she is very supportive and here running the whole computer system now on the screen so thank you darling don't anyway back to fine hair if we lift and layer fine hair many times what the end result is a perimeter here that looks like this just really wispy non existent hair so what we would suggest is we work with hair with a more natural fall.
Now, this is the question if I work a bit with a natural fall. for you here if we work in natural fall and just create kind of a consistent cut line from front to back, will we really get a parting like we see on this mannequin head? this is a little bit different just trying to think of what's best for me to be standing up so i can

show

that there we go so first thing is to start breaking apart where we want the live face frame inside the shape, so if we're really trying to preserve a nice solid bottom line let's just drop a line here don't judge me right now everyone if this is even you guys want a soda? did you ever say that? okay, okay, if we want to keep this line down here on the perimeter, we have to decide how far back we want the face framing to go before we start to go too far, so let's say it actually has some shoulders, here's his ear his shoulder would normally be right there come on let's say that's where we want the face framing to stop and start connecting to our perimeter we'd just take a vertical section to that point so we have a target point here, we're just going to take one of the drier section clips. these have a little elastic band on them so when you put it on dry hair it's not going to leave a crease that tells me ok here is the hair i have to work with as far as framing my face I know I have to stop here because if I go past that point I will again have a kind of disconnected feeling which is nothing wrong with it but I will either have a sense of detachment or I will have to continue back my perimeter at the back Lo The next thing we want to decide is where we want that first accent to be and you really know when we talk about things like face shape and balance one of the main principles that we tend to talk about is two things one that you want to highlight in the feat facial ures of your guest and maybe what are some of the things you want to hide a little bit so on that facial feature if they say hey I feel like I have a super wide face you probably don't want to cut this way here because that will probably make them feel wider, but if we leave something that falls a little past the cheeks and past the jaw line, that can narrow things down to the right, as long as it doesn't fall right on jaw line or if you feel like you have a very tall and thin face shape then maybe we want to open this up more maybe we want to point out that cheekbone that you really think is very beautiful maybe you actually have a really amazing jawline , so that could be the First, we put that point shorter to draw attention.
I have a question: when do you not frame all the way to the back section? So good question, Amy, so you can basically stop this point wherever you want, so let's just say they don't actually. i want to see that face framed go all the way back almost to the shoulder and that perimeter length at the shoulder i would just move that vertical section further forward and preserve more of that hair in the back thats really all it has to do and this is how you adjust it with Lydia let's really say we really like Jawa what we're going to do is we're actually going to take this is the artist series cutting slides this year this is by far a One of my all time favorite scissors. that I've created for this type of thing because when I get there I'm going to kind of move: I'll move as you cut and as you move when you cut sometimes if this year it's really sharp and it really grabs the squeezing of the hair it can create a chunk so with the slide cutting shear it allows the hair to push a little bit and allows us to have a softer shape and because we want to create a little bit of definition we want some separation. we're going to take that piece just a little piece we're going to create a little a little bit of tension on it we're going to take that slip cutting shear and place it just behind the hair and look I actually have an angle that's moving more diagonally towards go ahead so as you cut and slide you're creating some parting you're actually creating a little too much length from behind the hair to a longer piece now i know that's a little bit past the jawline but let's not get hung up on the little details ok it's more about technique so when that drops see how it actually creates separation if you had done it the opposite way if you had started at the shorter front in front and longer in the back will just create that soft angle so when you're working in the salon a lot of times you're like oh I'm creating these pieces, pieces, pieces and maybe your slip cut point but if the angle of short and long goes in a certain direction it can disappear so we're creating these contrasting angles so that it creates the visual texture it makes sense now we have our shortest point we have our longest point down here now we just start drawing connection points between the two we're not trying to create this perfect like remember jennifer aniston face framing or it was just this really perfect line that face framing for her which is definitely not what we're looking to create right now so next thing we're going to take a little more hair, just a little, don't think, okay, this is the line that leads there. so now i'm going to go down a bit and again with that slip cut shear work from shorter behind section now it's longer because lydia actually has a good amount of density in her hair this is going to be quite pronounced but this one is someone who has very fine very fine wispy hair what you'll notice is great like you're getting these little bits of separation and texture that actually separates and since we're working on natural fall we're going To maintain maximum density and texture at the tip, it's important that you take enough hair to create a piece because for many of you, this can be a bit scary, well, you may have a tendency to do is just take a whisper. of hair and just cut this little whisper of a piece that won't show on fine hair it will show on Lydia because it has the density to do it but on fine hair it won't cut it so there's a balance io careful and of course you can always follow that rule that you can always cut more hair but if you cut too much at first then you're in trouble so again we continue that line of sight working from the back of the section to the front and you can see what this light cutting shear does see how it doesn't actually grab the hair but allows the hair to push forward that's why I don't get that harsh line when I'm cutting this year just keep working creating those short pieces a long just visually making its way down making its way down so we start to hit that perimeter so there's that perimeter now you can always go back and adjust some of the pieces you can even dull the ends a bit on some of the pieces if you still feel feels too tex tree but what's cool guys it's even on screen because i can see it here you can definitely see that visual separation, can't you give me a thumbs up or a smiley face or something if you see that visual texture? again for some of you your taste might see me like oh it has a little bit of a blocked look a little bit of a chunky look to things remember our client showed us this kind of image with a ton of texture and we're talking about a client who has very thin fine hair you can definitely do this on medium hair textures so what you probably want to do after this is grab a blending clipper or something to remove a little bit of density from those ends to smooth them out a bit so great way a d very very simple approach when your customers show you something they want just a ton of visual texture great ok so far ok next technique oh we have a question wait a second person asks how you would approach a situation where a customer wants fix cant stand hair touching their face ok yeah this falls in territoryof realistic expectations, isn't it when they show you a picture that looks like this, but say I can't stand having hair on my face? well i don't really know if there is a solution for that kind of thing and we get this kind of thing quite often with our clients so in situations like that it's almost more of a consultation and more about our herbal skills with our clientele at that point. because we have to be willing, well limit, let me tell you a story.
I had a pretty famous client, yeah he walks in and sits in my chair and starts telling me how he wants his hair cut. It's me telling me exactly how she wants this process to happen and because she's pretty famous and has a pretty strong personality, I guess I just backed off a bit and didn't talk to the fact that what she was telling me. I had to do the process that I was supposed to do because she kept saying well my LM a hairdresser does blah blah blah like omg anyway I followed her instructions and of course she didn't do what she wanted. that was my mistake because I didn't say hey look the process you're telling me is not going to lead to that end result and I think it's a similar situation because when a customer asks us for something like hey I want these cool. pieces that frame my face but i can't stand my hair touching my face ok there's kind of a disconnect between those two things so the conversation needs to happen this way and it needs to say okay so i love it , I love the vision you have for those pieces that frame your face I'm not sure how you could get close to that where those pieces aren't going to touch her face so there are a couple of options we can look at other things other ways to get haircuts that will keep your hair away from your face or if you want that look of hair to go in around your face, then we may have to find a way for you to be okay with a couple of pieces touching your cheeks, in which direction you'd like to go today so basically what you did was put it into perspective here's option A here's option B these are all too realistic things I'm happy to do for you but still give the option back to the client po Because especially those pushy clients that's what they're looking for they're looking for control makes sense now there's a principle if it's short hair tends to be stronger than long hair so yeah if we cut it too short from the face to the back , you might blow-dry your hair to have more of that Farrah Fawcett II kind of almost like that because it's cut too short you might have that hair I want to sweep back but that will also require blow drying it won't do it automatically so that is the other realist part of the conversation, do you know if you're willing to spend some time blow-drying because I can cut the hair? a direction that will support that but you will still have a question about the blow dryer ok rebecca is asking is this going to be bald on the other side or will you use those pieces as a guide on the other side yeah good question ok because this was a bit observant here, it would be pretty hard to perfectly match those points on the opposite side, the part where you would create a match point on this side, but I don't even know if I would say a match point, just a balance point general. that would be where it first starts to hit, then from there I have where the first piece hits and I have my perimeter length so again I'm going to visually create some connections, typically most clients will never have that tendency. ncy to measure pieces and say look this piece is a little bit longer than this piece and especially because every time they move their heads those things are going to land in different positions you definitely have those clans sometimes that are yardstick type clients and it's also a very similar conversation with those customers which is hey look I understand you can pull this piece and pull this piece and they don't have the same length but if you sit down and look at it as an overall picture it has a picture Balance like so what two options for you.
I can make sure each piece is cut really super-perfectly, but it may not look as balanced as if we just had to create a visual balance between the two sides. Which would you prefer? I do you. put it back in your hands i hope that helps ok i'm not going to do the other side just because i have other techniques i want to show you i want to give you little bits of things that you guys can practice well with that we would do this on wet or dry hair for the most part of the time we suggest that the face framing and bangs be done on dry hair mainly we feel a bit more comfortable doing the wet face framing type haircut actually there are definitely times that i will show it in the haircuts, but especially when we get into the shorter bangs, that's where we're going to want to cut it dry and we'll talk about that a bit more as we get into the bangs part as part of that, but for the most part, we'd suggest dry because it's such a visual exercise you want to have the ability to step back and take a look and message a little bit and say ok this is how I want it to look when you cut it wet that's a little harder to do but hey try it see what happens that's how we learn alright so on our little diagram here if there's some really horrible slurring I should probably make Michelle , who is the artist, do this for me, but that's the point is we're holding t the hair in natural fall by cutting from shortest in the back to longest in the front all right let's go to another pattern for this one let's create a section from the top of the head probably to the back of the ear but again that section depends more on where you want the layers to be because this is going to be a much more layered type of process so with my clients and with our consultation we would come to make some agreements on that because some of your clients can one of the two have almost that kind of a V shape where it really goes back super super far maybe even way back so what Where your parting might go back to the horizontal transition or where the head begins to become flatter on the back? that's a possibility most will tend to want the face frame to fall somewhere around that shoulder point or maybe right in front so we'll typically find ourselves creating a parting more similar to this maybe at the back of t the ear to the mastoid area at the top of the ear or something like that, so first we're going to create that section from the highest point of the head to just behind the ear. hand and place it on the gap tooth place your other finger where you want to go so this finger goes right to where you wanted to stop here this finger goes to where I want to start our fingers actually go together you're naturally like this that you don't have to look for your goodbye especially for those students who are watching and I know some of our Sambia partner school students are watching thank you for being a part these are schools using sam through tools they use great part of our education in their classrooms once you understand that we'll just check for visual balance.
I decide we're doing it pretty good now, we're going to create a parting right here on what's called the vertical transition so that's a very important part of this because we need to do something slightly different above the vertical round of the head and down under it to find that we're going to take the comb and place it vertically on the side of the head that I'm going to use three fingers to hold it up and down so you can see that it's perfectly parallel to the wall. I don't want it this way and I don't want it this way.
It is straight up and down. place it right there where your index finger stops, that will be the point of the vertical transition, some of us call it the parietal ridge. I went hunting for a bit a while back because I'm a total fan of the parietal ridge actually. anatomy books there is no such thing as a rattle ridge did you all know i mean semantics but i like that sort of thing so we call it the vertical transition there is a parietal plate which is the flat plate that runs across the top of the head but uh yeah actually ex i asked my cli Ent doctor one time i was like why can't i find references to the parietal ridge in any of the anatomy books he is like what i was like the parietal ridge It's like yeah, that doesn't exist, well, okay, cool hairdressers make up their own. terminology which is ok now on a real client here's the tricky part with this vertical transition honestly for most people on a real client if we part based on bone structure and we're not parallel to the floor it's this line and this line is going to be the same side other than what you think yes or no type it in chat to get a little bit of everything so the answer of course is no because if we go based on bone structure a unless you have the only freak of nature in your clients. actually no human heads have perfect side to side balance so because lydia came out of a manufacturing plant she is fairly balanced side to side so her lines will be parallel to the floor but in a real normal human head this one could be a little lower this one can be a little taller and it's hard not to want to balance those things but it's not separating off the floor it's separating two heads naturally and it will actually make the heads things are more balanced, believe it or not. you have to trust that we will take a clip and place it on each side to keep them out of the way and then continue to a center parting so you can see the parting process so that you have Mountain High Point at the top of the back of the ear , you have that vertical transition, that horizontal or vertical transition, and then the dash down the center. i gotta go to the hair show on the weekend i love a love a little strong or something while you watch it's ok that's close enough i tend to get really stuck on perfect little things but it doesn't always have to be perfect right now depending on density of the hair you can potentially do this in one section and I also have very very long fingers so this is an acceptable section for my hand size for those of you who don't have big long monkey legs.
I have them, you can subdivide them into much smaller pieces so that you have something easier. controlling this is something I often forget to tell people yes Michele has a question Heather is asking if you ever take your clients away from the mirror to get a haircut. I'm asking this because our stylist does, but I don't just want your opinion. so let's see how I would answer that it depends, I guess, on the type of process you're going through and who the client is, is it a client who gets nervous seeing their hair cut or is it a client who is maybe going through because of a big change and you don't want to witness that change, then surely getting them away from the mirror could be a big thing now for me personally.
I wouldn't do that unless I feel like it's necessary just because we feel like the mirror is an amazing tool for because it's a second set of eyes the mirror shows you things you don't see from here so for me at least when I was in the salon full time all the time, I almost always had my client in front of the mirror. or what wasn't necessarily the client in front of the mirror, but what I was working on was in front of my mirror so I could reflect on them here, plus even from a conversational standpoint while you're talking to someone, it's nice to go look in the mirror and it creates a little bit of eye contact even if you're at the back of your head so yeah it's totally up to you your clientele so our elevation here at the top we call it ninety degrees horizontal it's basically parallel to the ground. a bit overdirected straight into the wall.
I'm going to take my comb, place it there. Look at my fingers in relation to the comb. They attach. point to be around ch eek bone yeah that looks nice if you want you can even put a little guide right there for that length so when you come out you have something to stop your fingers and we're going to create short too long , you can see that hair is losing tension okay we're going to use the Signature Series Reversible Blending Scissor this is the one with the very, very narrow tine spacing because look what I can do I can camp here with that blending scissor and just move slightly from side to side as we cut.
What's great about this is now we have a pretty sharp line with a soft edge very different from a blunt cut, so what does that do with that first cut? Look how cool that is. it automatically starts to build that face shape that is restricted to the haircut honestly it's a little shorter than I thought it would be but oh well luckily it's Lydia she's non-judgmental we have a question uh let's see , I can't see in the name define maybe ok ok so thin k is define how you standcomfortably to cut bangs or bangs another big question because a lot of times we're standing in positions that are pretty awkward mainly so you can see what we're doing in this particular case I would totally stay in front of her which before when I started doing my hair first time in the late 90's early 2000's this was not good there was some sort of rule that you shouldn't stand in front of your guests.
We don't think that's necessarily true anymore, so for us we would say stand right here, right in front of your guests, because that will keep them more comfortable, it will put you in a position to see your work the best that will come naturally. the reason I'm standing in this really awkward body position is so you can see what I'm doing a lot better so we continue with that diagonal angle that we created and we pick something that you know is like a 45 degree angle or something so he's predictable because now what we're going to do is we're going to repeat this process I'm not opposite the head I step to the opposite side one step here again so you can see but again to redefine or I'm definitely not here sure how to pronounce your name love sorry but back to your question how could i bear to cut this right in front because that's what will make more sense than heading straight into the wall almost like you're chilling? a shelf straight up to the wall that matches the same diagonal line and I still have my guide from the center so I don't necessarily have a guy on this side so I just have to trust that my finger angle is the same as I've got. on the opposite side and checked it visually, yeah that works pretty balanced.
Keep working and I'm actually subdividing this a bit. I would lie to you at first mainly because I was losing tension so you can see that horizontal lift or redirect straight is really is key to making sure that toe angle stays at that 45 and that shear action. I'm going to spin it. I wouldn't normally do this, but I'm camping with the blunt weight on the bottom. the teeth are going down at the top and just sailing back and forth if I had the teeth up the problem is when I pick up that blunt blade all the existing hair that you didn't cut is still stuck inside those teeth that's why i want that blunt blade on the bottom and we designed this year to be flip so you have that option now we're going to continue to the sides release my clip so far we've done this top so everything that's over directed forward we're tending that V shape 90 degrees horizontal now we're going to go to the side and you'll see it's more or less the same the rise stays at 90 degrees horizontal we continue with a diagonal toe angle but it's a very different process than we were doing with the others on top so that's why it's really important that you part the sides of the top so it's a little hard to cut so you can see the hair itself and my elevation on my cut line so the hair is on this side but it will give you a better visual of the actual cut line so I'm going to show you from the front first this section will just be directed straight forward so if she's looking directly at me each strand of hair is going to be kept parallel to the floor and i'm going to continue my diagonal now this is great i have a length guide here i have a length guide here so it creates the angle i need to preserve that perimeter I'll use that reversible blend shear to remove the length again to keep things smooth so when we drop this that creates that nice face for him around the front and it falls all the way down easily on the perimeter because you had two guide points that do the same thing on the opposite side, these sides will be a little easier for you to see how the hair is holding up, but on a stand exactly the same point back to that same question stand there in the front so we have a question from Allison is this the direction you would go if you were creating a modern shag so this might be a little bit different and it depends on what whatever you want because this is actually a cut that we call the modern shag now the very different thing you can take that across the board so they can see the two differences so a lot of times right now with this kind of modern shag we're looking at this, we're actually seeing more length going down through the jaw line where as you can see a very different line here where it's coming back and away from the face more not that this could not be considered fuzz but this kind of shapes have a bit more of a 70s feel to them, while this bit of length here around the cheekbone and jawline feels like it gives it that modern edge which is also a lot of opinion that you could have the completely different one so it really comes down to seeing what you and a client feel is the right way to give the end result you're looking for hope that makes sense great question though as you'll notice we don't offer much hard hard set opinions if you were watching Jesse before he said this and his performance before you know we don't feel like we're here to tell you what not to do we're here to introduce you here how things work if you do X and you do Y it will equal this if you do Z and X then it will be equal to this and what makes that decision good or bad is if it gives you the end result that you are looking for especially for an end result that is efficient and the best for your client so there is my shortest point my perimeter actually fell off a bit which is totally fine with me because that tells me I'm safe then I create that same diagonal and I'm sure a lot of you are wondering if I can I would cut this into you know what? hair textures, could you cut this out because we're cutting quite high up?
This is going to be more for you. ok natural fall but you can definitely use this on medium to thicker textures the only texture you might find yourself in a bit of a problem with this would be really thick heavy hair especially air with curl because since it's a kind of a lower rise as it goes up it creates a heavier graduation through that front edge compared to a super light soft finish so if you have thicker hair or if you had something that ended up being a bit heavier you could change your elevation higher and that goes to smooth things out you can also change your tools you could cut pointed you can cut blunt thats a personal preference now usually especially in classrooms if I just show at this point, everyone says Now what do you do from here to back?
Whatever you want that's the answer honestly because this is not the haircut this is the face framing so the next step or even maybe the step you did before you did the face framing was build up. the rest of the shape because you could cut this super short at the crown you could keep the layers getting longer you could continue this process you could take sections all the way to the front and just repeat the same process right and it's going to give you that super layered shape long and heavy that elongates in the back so you can match your face framing to whatever you want. give me a smiley a heart something up there love to hear from you and if you're having some aha moments put it in the face frame in text chat ok so let's get into some

fringe

cuts ok getting lots of hearts and thumbs up yay it's just about him guys i mean it's not just because my wife is here i mean of course it's not just like that i just know the hairdresser ok the bangs i definitely want to show you guys because this is probably what i get asked questions so often it's this thing called curtain fringe now if you haven't been on our youtube channel you probably haven't seen this but actually we have probably six or seven different videos in french of curtains because there are so many more ways on how to cut curtain fringe, so I'm going to share with you my personal favorite.
I showed this to Jesse Lynn Harris when he was here filming a couple of months ago and he loved it too so yeah thanks he said he has become a favorite of hers yeah we will just use it again why not we'll just keep cutting Lydia shorter and shorter and shorter sounds good with this the splitting is a little tricky so I'm going to fast forward this just for a moment so you can get a good picture of the sectioning drop this do wn for you real quick there we go so sectioning is very interesting because you have to create a very very wide view to start with and of course I'll also show this in the head but maybe you it's coming from the top of the head or right in front of the top of the head and we're going to create a very, very wide, actually this V is going to go all the way down past the recession areas because we want really encapsulate and encapsulate in capture I don't know what those words mean it looks like they might fit here I don't know like I said I've been sitting in front of a computer or too long so we want the initial view to be really wide so let's take a and very d thin going to the center point of the eyeball right at the pupil there and you can see that from a very wide front view with a thin B in the center ok so that's your first sectioning pattern now with something like this , we definitely suggest you do what do you do with dry hair?
This is why one day I as a young hairdresser young inexperienced hairdresser decided I was going to cut wet bangs with an even worse razor so I started pulling out my section and you know there is a big difference between cutting the front of your fingers with a scissor and cutting behind your fingers with a razor and it's called length so I pulled out my length and thought oh yeah that's a nice length I got behind my fingers with the razor and i start cutting all ready to go oh ok wow that's short this is on wet hair.
I pull out my paddle brush, look at my blow dryer, and start wrapping, blow-drying my bangs. Everyone knows what happens next. and suddenly she has baby bangs when she wanted her to suit as french so why do we cut dry hair when we want to cut bangs? Two reasons, one, we're going to be able to see exactly where that bangs are. it's going to lie down and we're not going to and we're going to have that visual process where you can see things as they happen we're not going to get that shrink factor i have a question yes i'm going to guess it's D maybe what kind of face shape it goes with this shape of haircut ok so i will tell you the me personally and i know sam teaches more about specific face shapes and things for me personally.
I've never seen a hair salon like that before, so it goes back to what we talked about earlier. A lot of times when we talk about balance in the shapes of faces, it doesn't make any sense to me, like the diamond in the heart, because I know I look at people's faces and I just don't see those things very well. I think it's more of a perception thing Sam is really good he's got that artistic brain that probably sees those shapes more easily so for me personally I'm a bit more of a technical hairstylist it makes sense what I want to draw attention to and so What do I want to divert attention from?
Tell me this type of haircut if I look at what is drawing attention definitely the eyes from what is drawing attention is potentially wide because we are allowing some of this hair to fall more across the cheekbone so if I wanted to draw more of the attention to the cheekbone maybe I would make it wider I would cut this a little shorter so it actually hits the cheekbone more but this is going to go really well with the length and sweep that cheekbone so it's going to hide some width if it's happening more up here now because it's opening up here although it may not necessarily create the thinnest jaw line so again to me it's more about what you're trying to get attention to and what you're trying to divert so I hope that helps so that's sectioning.
Again we're going to start right in front of the highest point. Give me some time. Check, Michelle. We are in 48 minutes. No way. I hope you're okay with that, we've got a little bit of room to play, that's actually part of the reason we didn't put this on everything every 45 minutes because we know we're not good at staying cool. so our first section i'm going to speed up a bit here the first section is YB coming from the high point towards the recession areas now we're going to create a second V shape coming from the same high point but now it's going to be a lot thinner we're going to go to the center of the eyeball on the other side again here we'll just take that and gently cut it with those dry sectioning clips to hold the hair back on the opposite side is the center of the eye which is where I want to connect at that point, so this first section is pretty simple andpretty similar to what we did before raising the hair to 90 degrees horizontal just parallel to the floor as you see there oh you don't see that because I know it was behind your head but as you see there we're going to create an angle of vertical finger and we're going to cut the length so that the shortest length or the longest length just kind of forms a ridge in the ditch of our nose.
I don't want to get to my end length at this point if you start cutting to your end length at this point it's going to be too short so you need to cut a bit on the long side especially for those of you who are just starting out as a hammer maybe still in school one of the rules of thumb with the fringe cut you can always cut more hair so always start at a vertical angle of the fingers parallel to the floor we are going to cut with a very soft point that this is the six and a quarter inch aero jacket that we make this is a very light fork very tight it's like my PLU driver right now it's just a really comfortable fork and actually I know for a fact that I need to go further short than that just because i worked on lydia long enough you know that won't be the right length so clean up some more of that with that drop and then we'll comb it down check it out so what should you do with it's first? the section is very, very smooth, layered texture now honestly I could still probably go even a tiny bit shorter but ok what we're looking for with this is to see how we get that surface texture and all the movements already built into it which ends up.
What happens very, very often with this kind of thing is we start here, we start with a length and cut our length, then we start texturing the crap out of this stuff to try to get it to come loose, go back to the basics of the haircut if you want something loose and soft do you cut it blunt to what length? No, you layer it where you graduate it correctly. The exact same principles apply here on the bangs. Now you could and we show you an option with this where you just take those outside s and more straight to the center that will give you a smooth build up of length to the outside we don't want a smooth build up of length we want an extreme drop in length so we have we need to change something we need to use the angle finger to create this so we're going to take horizontal sections we're going to raise them to the same elevation there's my shortest point which is my guide point from the strip now I can use the angle of my finger to create very, very long from the outward at that length in the center of the stripe so the drop is much more significant than what I would get by just directing to the center how many sections do you take how many horizontal sections do you take inside those outer pieces is really going to be dictated by the density of the hair if you have fairly fine hair you may not even need to take extra sections you just might s happen in one section so it all goes to the front cutting parallel this is very very similar to what we did on the face framing earlier just a really nice soft point cut now of course it's a little bit more pressed down so you won't have that nice sweeping feel like you would have the pre done but you can see how that just sort of ridges really well we're on the cheekbone don't worry about these lengths still in the center , we'll get to those in a second, yeah April's question, will it be smoother with texturizers?
Yeah you could definitely do that April you could do exactly what we did with well actually you have to change my answer yes or no the answer is yes you could use texture this is going to be smoother because I'm actually using a technique pretty deep point cut that's going to be smoother and more textured more visually textured so if I create a more blunt line with the texturing shear like I did before with the face framing so if you wanted this to hold a bit longer solid but you still wanted a smooth finish you could definitely cut this more e like i cut the face framing with the reversible blender if it gained the visual separation like we have here that's where you need to do the point cut so that those peaks and valleys They happen only because of time. to take this all as one section it's going to be easier for me to stand to the side here to get my angle and again we'll cut the cut point so long it's actually pretty balanced and I'm impressed with myself so now yeah then the dummy lilac is the face framing is the face framing layers i showed you guys that's it it's longer.
I started out a little too short on my Lydia mannequin head when I showed you the demo so just in the first section we would have just gone longer that's why she has more of that sweet pea bangs and in actually it was still cut off the center believe it or not but since it's cut off the center you have the option to push it in direction that's why you have that long s over here great so the final process here now is just to touch up their lengths in the center because that's the part that she needs to see so we just take that little triangle right there in the center and put it in a column and just start cutting some pieces and overall this is probably a little long like this so forgive me for that but that's the look right now with these curtain fringe things are very developed and it's just a little bit in the center that it's the right length from there it's just texturi zar and detail to your heart's content so hopefully between those three different techniques you have some things that you can take to the salon because that's why we're here we want you to have this time at home in a way that you feel like you can get back to the classroom because we will we can't say enough guys this will change we will be back in the classroom the classroom will probably be different so we have to stay F lexible and we have to keep moving but we will end up there so the purpose of this education is to put these things in your hands so you have a few things to practice and develop during your time at home so that when you get back to the salon you can be super fresh, super strong and really ready to give your clientele a completely different experience than they ever expected before , this is how we are going to get through this so we have a prize to give away we have a Lydia mannequin head and a VIP membership to Chicago cosmetologist giving her three days of abs and 2021 and the winner is stephanie dietrichson doesn't say where from but stephanie dietrichson is our winner so congratulations to stephanie i wanted to let

andrew

know he is definitely a mentor to her and she watches her upbringing all the time.
Thank you Stephanie cheering on the other girl so next we have Miss Anna Peters to continue showing you the basics and fundamentals of up. style she is so wonderful so stay tuned much more coming today thank you guys for watching i am the director of education at

andrew

carruthers

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