YTread Logo
YTread Logo

The Prehistoric Remains Buried In The Isles Of Scotland | Time Team | Odyssey

Nov 09, 2021
Welcome to the Isle of Barrow in the Outer Hebrides. We are about 50 miles from the west coast of Scotland. It's always a bit windy here but recently a particularly strong storm ripped this whole sand dune apart revealing this and I know it's hard to see but believe it or not this is all

prehistoric

archeology but what even I can see It's here, this is a burial, look, can you see those bones that I assume are ribs? All of this has been exposed for the first

time

in thousands of years. how long the

team

has been Called on a three-day rescue mission to examine this extraordinary windswept site and record the evidence before it all vanishes forever.
the prehistoric remains buried in the isles of scotland time team odyssey
The

team

time

travels across the UK, but this journey from glasgow to the isle of barrow in the outer hebrides it really feels like a little adventure to begin with the only place to land a plane on this island is on the beach it already feels like we have arrived at a very different part of great britain, there are only about a thousand people living in barra today and vast areas of unspoiled landscape contain fantastically preserved

prehistoric

archaeology, the only threat to it is extreme weather that can destroy thousands of years of history in a matter of minutes, we have been called in to salvaging some archeology here in allersdale on the western side of the island where some burials have been exposed in the sand dunes i have to admit that if i had come here on my own without any archaeologist i would have had no idea this was prehistoric it just looks like an ordinary beach to look at this looks like something a couple of teenagers might have thrown for a beach party last year i wanna say i agree it looks like someone had a bbq fire or something yeah victor drew a picture to show you what it would have looked like originally it looks like with the burial in the middle there with all the stones around the edge, yes, that's convincing, but it's not proof, is it?
the prehistoric remains buried in the isles of scotland time team odyssey

More Interesting Facts About,

the prehistoric remains buried in the isles of scotland time team odyssey...

It's because this actually h as excavated, there was a salvage excavation here when this site was revealed and the radiocarbon date of 1800 to 1400 BCE. c. middle bronze age if it has been excavated why are we excavating it because since that excavation there has been more erosion that way and it opened up? there are many more structures there, so there is much more to do, so we know that some of these burials are from the middle bronze age, approximately four thousand years, but what amazes me is that they vary so much in size. you couldn't put a body in there tony you could put them in there if it was cremated the point is this is the style of burial you have here we are calling them kissing burials some people like to call them cysts burial but to me it's more of a medical term the kind of thing you land on, you know, but either way kissed or encysted, it's this style of burial where you get a little variety of stones and it's like a stone built tomb and you put the dead person in there it's typical so one a kissing burial two yes i mean it is a different size and shape but it is the same basic idea this is going to be a race against time we have three days to learn as much as we can from the wealth of prehistoric material on display here before we everything is lost forever, we have a rare opportunity to build a picture of life here thousands of years ago and there is real excitement because we have never excavated a site before like this luckily we have two experts with us who have mike parker pearson and keith brannigan a bit of a mess to sort out right, what we're looking at is a jumble of rocks, it looks chaotic, but it's a very complicated sight. the reason it's tricky is that a lot of the mess here is relatively modern archeology originally it was in the upper layers but it sank when the sand blew away and it all got mixed up with bronze age burials the first work will be clear out remove the much later stuff so we can see the prehistory toric stay clearer we've been looking at this we have a plan of this site made during the salvage dig a year ago it shows the four kisses that have already been excavated and the site of a prehistoric roundabout that has never been investigated and is now being severely show me where the erosion is huh that's the floor here this black deposit sitting on the sand yes it's being carved over there by kate yes the wall we think is running around and here it looks like we have the entrance porch so this is the wall here we think the wall goes through here there is a side wall here is the other so we have A porch here is not easy to see but these are the

remains

of a prehistoric round house with the entrance still intact, although this half of the building has eroded away.
the prehistoric remains buried in the isles of scotland time team odyssey
I feel very nervous walking through all this archaeology. Yes it should be. It's very fragile and to find this kind of thing, a floor that people walked on and slept on, is really extraordinary. People have been building roundhouses on this island since at least the Neolithic period, about 7,000 years ago, but it is more likely that our roundhouse was built in the Bronze Age, about four thousand years ago, or even later. in the Iron Age, which makes it a mere 2,500 years old. years old to find out how old it is we need to find some dateable evidence like pottery but one of the main goals of this dig will be to learn more about the many strange burial practices that took place here in the bronze age and most a urgent rescue work is to investigate a kissed burial here which is being heavily eroded this kist appears to contain not only the skeleton of a small child but also the cremated

remains

of another person on top these pieces of bone are flying yes it is the problem is these two individuals actually look juvenile they're probably about five or six years old so the bone is very very light and as you can see it's almost being dug out just because the sun is blowing and it's bloated I mean so what is that with this being an ear bone ok so it's under here this is what it looks like on the inside basically yeah jackie can tell the cremated remains were also a child burial because this tooth has survived the fire and is still intact, allowing you to say it is a minor rather than an adult, yeah right, Jackie's challenge today will be to carefully unearth the evidence to solve the story of this double burial obviously it was done in a short relatively short time frame picture where you would know this animation burial was here now if they were done at the same time and for some reason one individual was cremated and the other was not um or if several years passed between that, yes, and the grade was marked on something, is there any way to tell if they were related?
the prehistoric remains buried in the isles of scotland time team odyssey
No, it would be a guess, I really mean the fact that you have two people inside the same tomb. suggests there is some sort of relationship but in a close knit community they might just be good friends, yes luckily nowhere on the island is more than a 15 minute drive away and we have found a shelter to escape the wind the local school goes to be our incident room for the next three days, stuart, why do you think our settlement is so close to the sea that i couldn't see a harbor or anything like that there? no it's actually pretty hard not to be near the sea here on an island where henry's model shows very well the little red dots where we're digging look at how it's dominated by these mountains and high ground these are rock outcroppings really hard to get to settle to live but around the limits here you have got these low lying areas locally they are called maca it is a Gallic word meaning low fertile land it only occurs in the western

isles

of

scotland

and in ireland and it is very rich agricultural land it is an ideal place for settle down one of the nice things about maca is because it's very soft you can actually dig in another place where it's rocky you can't dig into the ground so it helps that concept of digging and sheltering in there with the grassland of maca that provides the best place to live. the island, our site here may have been occupied for thousands of years, so how old is the rotunda we are revealing in the sand?
Phil thinks he has found the answer. a kitchen container and we actually have the top so if I pick it up very carefully you'll see we have bits of rock here so this is all going to be produced locally this is local clay from the other side would have been out here and the bottom down there is a big old pot yes and you can see the seat on the outside and that is from the peat fire so it actually sat on the fire itself and you say this is where the main hearth of central kitchen would have been, yes, right in the middle of the house because right there you can see that as you go in you burn more and more you have masses and masses of coal right on the edge of the ditch which is the edge of the fire, so yeah the fire would have been right down there we're right next to it and from other places where we've excavated floors of houses like this this was the kitchen area so I'm not surprised to find that there in all this thick piece of pottery suggests that our roundhouse is of the age iron, probably built around 500 B.C.
The question is how they managed to make pottery here in prehistoric times because then, as now, there were very few trees on the island and no source of wood ready to fire a kiln for the next three days. We are going to carry out an experiment to build a kiln based on evidence found in bar, is this the type of structure you would use to burn pottery? So yeah, we found something like this at the Neolithic site on the other side of the island, um, where they dug a hole, put a pump in, and essentially put the pot. on the bonfire and then they build a dome over it with, uh, peat slabs or grass slabs so it doesn't kill us, no, no, it's what we call a clamp and they're using peat to do this, uh, yeah, yeah , that's one of the really cool things about it, when you get to the early bronze age around here, there's almost no wood left, so other than starting it up, the only thing you can use seems to be Pete, so it will be very interesting to see it. if we can get a successful firing just using pete so it's a genuine piece of experimental archeology then to see how you do it if it works if the fuel works that would be very exciting yes we have dug up some local clay to make something. pots for this experiment and enlisted the help of a professional potter prehistoric pottery was made by hand using rolls of clay but amateur potter mick aston is not happy with his materials it's just rubbish it's falling apart everything is crumbling around it's like the build game here is It's terrible that there isn't enough clay in proportion to the sand and that the clay is what helps it stick and the sand is what gives it the strength and if the proportion isn't right then you can't really think about it much maybe the answer is that they didn't use this potting clay on the island because it doesn't seem to be suitable at all no it isn't but if they can't use it for pots then if there is evidence of kilns, are they bringing the raw clay from somewhere else?
I mean it sounds even more or they knew a better source and purer sounds. I'm relieved to see yours falling apart too. they'll have to do everything they can so that we at least have me pots to try in our prehistoric clamp oven tomorrow in the arena no rush the delicate job of digging up the double burial at the moment jack is busy carefully removing the cremated remains before he can start work on the burial below. henry is making a 3d model of the landscape and can show the areas geofiz have surveyed around the site so far although most of what they have detected is natural geology their latest survey here has revealed something that they're really excited about what we've done is we've worked our way up from the main site so we've come around in an arc avoiding all the steep inclines and look we've got this fantastic response here I mean this looks like a bronze age round house bronze age or iron age yes it is appearing very clearly we are standing right in the middle here also p You can see it as an earth movement, can't you see, yeah, come on, let's take a look, this bench over here, look too, it's a big deal, yeah? well this must be the edge of this over here yeah and some of those stones around that side must be the other side well you could raise a big family on that couldn't you yeah and it comes right over here ? inside face of the building so you have a wall that is going to be very thick ok this is fantastic it looks like Geophys has detected the biggest round house I've ever seen the problem is Mick isn't sure what we have time to dig.
So what we really should do is continue what we're doing there, see how we're doing and then if we have time think about this and whatever else John comes up with, now it's our job here that has priority. so that's the upper jaw elower, yes, we've got the hole, yes, it's a big ball that's rolling around, which is good, and that's the rest of the upper jaw that's inside. It took almost a full day to dig, but now we have the story of it. double burial the original kist was built for a four-year-old boy who was

buried

in a crouching position with a circle of stones placed around it to mark the grave and protect it from the wind and then, at some point in his living memory, another boy of an age similar was cremated somewhere near a pyre like this, the ashes being placed on top of the earlier burial and the stones rearranged in a smaller circle to mark the newer grave.
I couldn't figure this out this morning, but now it's really starting to make sense, isn't it? I mean, I have to confess, when you said that if we remove the rocks and clean up the sand, you'll have the archeological deposits on the side, only half believed you this morning, well, we're starting to find these uh new kisses there and down here, like this. like our early iron age rotunda there's another one and it's probably a later building who knows what else we have there it's very very cool what do we do tomorrow? i looked at those kisses there is something earlier under them wait wait wait wait if they are early bronze age middle bronze age yes and you said there is something earlier under them and it will be early bronze age or neolithic yes probably early bronze age if we are very lucky there might even be a house underneath which would be fantastic.
We start this morning with a beach and we already have an archaeological site thanks to some excellent work in really difficult conditions and tomorrow we are going down to archeology that is if the weather holds up from the second day here in barra in the outer hebridean islands hit by the wind and it's here part of the time gear you don't see very often the wind is so gusty we'll have to moor the portaloo otherwise it might end up in glasgow and we've got sandbags along the bottom of the tent to prevent it from flying the reason we're prepared to put up with all this horrible weather is because right around the corner we're doing a rescue archeology work we've got some fantastic stuff out there all prehistoric at least two houses possibly four burials and we have to work hard as quickly and efficiently as possible because the weather is so unpredictable that with wind and rain the whole site could blow up at any moment with no time to waste jackie's job started here investigating another bronze age kissed burial luckily this one hasn't been still eroded and the calcium in the sand has helped preserve these bones incredibly well jackie thinks we could get a really good story here as you can see we have all the kissing stones surviving here and this has protected this grave and the whole of the tomb of the scars of the wind that rises in the same way that we had in the one that we saw yesterday and the other The first thing is, as you can see in the skull here, it's a full-size adult, so the bone is much more robust than the young individuals we had yesterday.
It's n Not only is human bone well preserved, we're finding bones of sheep and birds that give us an idea of ​​their diet. This bird bone, in fact, may also have been used to decorate this piece of pottery from the Bronze Age. there's one there one there we're also getting tickets that we've never seen before well this is a bit of an unusual looking bone and it's actually the ulna which is part of the arm of a gray seal so this gives us says they not only have some kind of farm pets, land animals, but they are actually going out and hunting, if you look around the island you can always see the gray seals showing up, the times you hunt them is in the fall and that's when they come to the lamb to pop and they're a lot slower because they're obviously protecting their pups and stuff and that's when you catch them we have evidence that they went out seasonally to the islands and actually hunted seals in prehistoric times by people living here you are completely self-sufficient it is very different nowadays when almost everything arrives by boat here in castle bay which is the closest thing to a village on the island in the bronze age one of the best it's places to live it was here in la maca where it was possible to farm on the sandy soil surprisingly now we have found traces of prehistoric plow marks in the sand so this was all that was left of an area of ​​fields that probably covered most of this and it would have been early bronze age which is going to be early bronze age because it looks like the kisses are cut into it so there is one dotted all over this here today it seems strange to find marks plowing here but in the bronze age there were no large sand dunes on this site this maca area was mostly flat farmland maca landscapes are rare and only thrive in wet and windy conditions in the uk they are only found in the north and west of

scotland

and in the west of ireland just under half of scottish macca are found in the outer hebrides s and our dig here in barra is a rare opportunity to discovering all sorts of details of prehistoric life in some cases very strange things like burying a sheep under the floor of this iron age round house we actually have a sequence of features seeing that this black thing there now that suddenly it's it stops there so our burial is later than that but it's very very clearly under the floor this black cloak that runs real lengthwise is the floor of our iron age hut so this burial it must be at least iron age and mike was saying that in the northeast quadrant which is where we are it's quite common to bury animal burials under the ground that's absolutely unbelievable we're discovering a rich history of activity here over many centuries it begins with evidence of plowing here in the early bronze age around 1700 BC.
C. and then all these bronze age kisses are placed here around 1400 B.C. at the same time and then at this end of the site we have two roundhouses that are from the early iron age around 500 and 400 BC mike believes that the roundhouses we are excavating were part of a small settlement that existed at this location more than thousands of years old just one of the many clusters of houses scattered along this shoreline they are not quite villages they are villages but they are about three quarters of a mile apart from each other but below this lot there must be many, many more of them yeah I think all this area that we're in right now is going to be just a few percent five to ten percent of the total area this is prehistoric for example we don't have the settlement where the people that were

buried

here lived what it's our iron age and I bet it wasn't that far off and it's pretty mind blowing how much must be buried here yes we are finding out the history of bronze age burials like this though which one is jack now able to tell us it's a woman's grave we haven't found any t race where these people lived 4000 years ago with this in mind mick has decided we should dig a little trench here over the huge round house geophys detected yesterday we want to know if this building is part of the iron age settlement or if it could be the remains of an earlier bronze age roundhouse just a mile away we are going to try and get our experimental prehistoric clamp furnace going we want to find out if it is possible to use peat as fuel to fire pottery because wood was scarce here in the iron age, it is thought that they probably had enough driftwood to run the kiln, in fact we are using paper and wood as firewood just to make sure it gets good light to the whole school, these seven children are anxious to see what happens because they have made their own creations to go in the oven and apart from The punctual use of a torch will be looking at a real experiment with prehistoric technology the plan is to let ours burn for at least five hours and then we'll open it up tomorrow when it cools down here phil go break a wall you got a friend can i come to your home by all means tony yeah make yourself at home and i'll show you some of the items? what you'll find at my house we have these huge blocks of weed i'm going to try to look excited it's a big piece of weed look at it yeah it's covered in sand i know but it's iron age it's the iron age but what we're really excited about is which we are not sure but we think it could be part of a mold that they are making bronze in that is burning yes it is made of clay and they would actually have the shape of the bronze object in it and of course the bronze and the bronze object is brought out because even though we call the earlier age the bronze age we almost never find evidence of it in our dinks that's right but of course you know the fact that they are in the age of iron doesn't mean tell you hey I stopped making bronze yeah but of course our real find isn't here at all it's what's behind you yeah you see we've got three courses on a wall but what is really very good about this is that we actually have It's the floral. who walked and lived so here we have phil's iron age roundabout but the really exciting news right now is that in this game of trenches you have your own playable arena yeah that's cool isn't it So?
How's it going? well not bad i mean it was really hard to remove this grass it's really hard i mean as you can see below it's just this sandwich we're scooping yeah matt figured out the building here isn't a roundabout common but the remains of a massive iron age wheelhouse a much more sophisticated building so named because it was split like the spokes of a wheel, so what are we looking at here? Well, this trench is only less than a quarter, only smaller than a quarter of the whole. roll so the center of is just beyond the red peg over there to the right we have the entrance to the wheelhouse here we've picked up in the geophysics the gap in the wall and in the corner we have the start of the radius in the center right there where the red peg is and then it slants out of the trench that way and then behind you there so this is actually the outer edge it probably isn't like that yeah I mean but is it the sort of thing? you would expect to find well what i didn't expect was what appears to be the great depth of stone work on a reasonably solid wall i mean a wall that has two faces there it looks like you have an interface of the outer face solid stones with some of best machines i must say i have seen lineage site in the western arms getting better and better not only do we have a well preserved iron age structure here but it looks like there are fines on the floor of the building this is just one from various pieces of whale bone.
We'll find out more about them tomorrow, so as we get closer to the end of the day, not only do we have here our early iron age roundhouses dating from around 500 B.C. but now we have a later Iron Age building a wheelhouse dating to around AD 100. And as if that wasn't enough, Jackie also made a remarkable discovery while he was excavating the burial of this Bronze Age woman. Jack detected two different layers of sand, one layer that pooled around the edges suggesting this burial had a cover over it and a second layer that filled the kiss completely, there must be something on top but the material allowed to go in around the edges, but obviously it's not going to be wood, is it? because there is no wood, you know? really on the island so something like wicker work or rush mats or something or it could have been a skin or textiles or something like skin would last pretty good shoe leather or something if the covering was leather of animal then the kiss would look like this when the burial took place about four thousand years ago finding evidence of a cover over a burial is a unique discovery and jackie will continue to investigate this burial tomorrow but already with the three kists we are excavating and the four burials that they were excavated before we got here it is clear that there were all sorts of different burial practices here in the bronze age some are crouching burials one appeared to be a small mass grave containing babies and fetuses another had teeth from a burial thrown into the grave of another individual a grave had cremated remains placed on top of a previous burial with bones pushed to the side to make room in the kist what pi Our burial expert is teaching all of this well this is interesting it's the woman in a fetal position because she's lying on her right side and it's something we find all over Britain at the moment is that women tend to be buried on their right side and the men on your left side um suggests that there may be a difference in lifestyle between men and women at the time but what about this other stuff mike some very strange things that are going on aren't there? of burial like thatbending over that you're putting them in the grave whole, yes, but of course what they're really doing with probably most people is, in a sense, turning the corpse into bones, so it may be that the remains of someone are basically scattered broken and put in different places maybe in a grave maybe the rest in the sea for all we know i think we are looking at a way of life where respect for ancestors was much more important than in ours and Of course, keeping the actual remains of the dead is not just a sign of respect, but a way to commemorate them or to remember who they were so that they have to be treated in a way that would seem rather strange to us. inhabiting the same space in some cases maybe being carried as a souvenir i guess you would really have a sense of continuity you would know where you are in the family if you always had your grandfather with you because he injured his femur Yes, and I think it's really interesting when those things finally come to rest, especially where we have these disarticulated bones because in a sense, that's enough, now they pass beyond memory and forget that I can't remember a team of time where there's so many many different things i have wanted to see on the third day there is the iron age wheelhouse of course a fantastic structure that surely can only get better here is phil's iron age round house tomorrow he is going to the floor there will be the fines there we don't know and then there are the pyres there where ian is digging what's going on there and probably the most exciting thing is that incredibly evocative bronze age woman crouching in her kissed area there will be no grave goods associated with her, no we will know until tomorrow, what I do know is that practically everyone has gone to the pub to have a few drinks and listen to music, I think it should be done from the third day.
Here in Barrow in the Outer Hebrides where we're doing some fantastic prehistoric archeology salvage work. The weather forecast said today was going to be better than yesterday, so I don't know what's going on, but at least the rain is running off. straight through the sand and it doesn't create muddy trenches and it doesn't blow everywhere so the archaeologists quite like it lucky rain or not we've got some amazing stuff to dig today Phil is going to be investigating his driveway Iron Age circular, which we believe dates to around 500 B.C. outside the main excavation area, we're unearthing something even more impressive.
This enormous structure is what is known as a wheelhouse. er in the iron age around 100 AD. but we are also excavating some burials that were here about 2,000 years before any of the iron age buildings these kissed burials are from the bronze age although some have been damaged by erosion this burial of a woman who lived here 4,000 years ago it's perfectly preserved in the soft sand thanks to jackie's experience it feels like we're meeting this lady who was between 35 and 45 judging by the wear and tear on her knees i'm starting to identify a lot with this it's feminine it's my age and i also have a little iffy knees it's beautiful the way her hands have come together in front of a face we see this is one of the arms reaching to the wrist here this is one reaching to the wrist and it what you can see here is this knuckle part of the hand and from there you can see the fingers are curling so really what they've done is their hands are coming together like this yeah in front of her face yesterday in the afternoon at phil's roundhouse dug in there he showed me some rubbish and said it was evidence of bronze making but then when the cameras stopped rolling he told me i hope i didn't make a mistake because if i did, i'll look at a good wally so phil you're a wally i don't think it's tony i'm more convinced of my statement than yesterday the truth is that now that i entered the entrance corridor to our roundabout you come through the entrance corridor and the entrance to the roundabout would be here and what they have done is block it with these big stones now the real truth of my statement yesterday lies in the material that they used to block that entrance because we have here some big slabs of baked clay that hit those are the kinds of lumps of material that would have come out of a kiln or kiln, the type of structure you would associate with metal working, so why were they blocking the door?
Well, this is something we encounter in quite a few situations. it's in this region in this period, can you see between Phil's feet? Yeah, there's a thin smudge coming this way and that's where there would have been a stone slab that would have formed the threshold, so you step on that and go into the house they've taken over. that was, yes, then they piled up these big rocks where the entrance to the house used to be, which is why it's abandoned, they sealed it up, and then when it was maybe, yes, maybe the inhabitants died, they closed it after they saw evidence similar to other sites make sure they aren't metalworking the entrance, but using things like sword molds and other industrial materials to block the entrance when they left the roundhouse, it's possible the metalworking still looked like a process magical and these shards may have been left behind as a symbol of his power, Phil's next job is to carefully remove the stones from this entrance to see what else he can find to shed light on these strange practices in the meantime in this trench where we're uncovered.
In our iron age wheelhouse, Matt has been lifting the pieces of whale bone that were discovered yesterday and I'm intrigued to see what our expert does with them. Well, I can tell you it's a whale bone and I can tell you it's a big whale. I can also tell you that it is actually a rib and there has been some suggestion that people would use ribs structurally because they have been found lying on top of houses. This one I'm not sure if it's really been used structurally because it's been worked at the end and I can tell it's grooved because if you look at the ends it has kind of thick bone around the edge and then this kind of honeycomb bone on the inside and that's typical of a rib although it's a pretty big whale and put it down too I mean if you think of a whale all the whale is is a head and a backbone yeah and some fins so there's a lot of meat you can get without needing to retrieve the bone so there's a deliberate reason why they brought it here they bring it back and if you think we're living in an environment that's usually treeless there aren't many trees and if you want to make something they tend to use a lot of bone to make tools and whalebone is fabulous because whalebone is the closest thing to wood that you have it's big and you can work it now pieces like this piece of vertebra has clearly been cut and used for something although it's hard to know exactly what for but this was the most prized piece of bone because it's the strongest that the jawbone comes from the jawbone of the whale the jawbone is actually this part here , yes, and it's because most whale bodies are water-based, so they have these kind of very light honeycomb bodies, but the jawbone is obviously the commercial end of the whale, so this is where they make the densest bone and this is where you make the best tools we have some others that look like they were used for weaving this I don't really know but you have to remember that what we see in these si des is a lot of material that we normally wouldn't we found in other places because here they are doing things with bone that you would normally do with wood and the wood would rot and the wood would generally be wasted so it's a bit like digging a flooded site you know s that you are preserving things you have never seen before in the main excavation area we have the two iron age round houses here and a number of bronze age burials but this area is still a puzzle we thought this was where they were cremating bodies in the bronze age but the latest finds here suggest they may have been making pottery well you can see the black layer in the middle where when they have fired this the fire hasn't reached it just stopped at the edges which is one of the reasons this is falling apart it's going to go back to just raw clay pretty much basically what they've done is just turn some clay into a frilly pot and throw it into a fire somewhere, yeah that sounds too much.
I don't like what we've been doing trying to make prehistoric pottery. This is the moment of truth. Our experimental clamp kiln was all about trying to use peat as fuel instead of wood. Everyone here made something to put in the oven. Now they can see. What happened to him? Many of the pots have broken due to poor quality local clay, but some of the other pots were made from different types of clay and fired well. It feels? clay which is a modern clay called a hand crank ah, that's what we use in modern pottery classes, isn't it?
That shows that our oven as an oven has worked. with the clay yeah because this is really good the hard stuff yeah that's interesting because if if the clamp worked then all our skepticism about peat as fuel yeah I was wrong yeah while our utter cynicism on clay it was completely justified, yeah, in the middle of day three and the sun is up again and there's a lot of work going on, particularly on the recording, you can see this is Phil's roundabout and it's been gridded for various samples , as it turned out that there were two sheep buried under this floor and the bones will be radiocarbon dated to get a more exact date for this rotunda, but at this time we believe it to be an Early Iron Age dating to around 500 BCE.
C., but look, can you see these stones here and see how they rotate like this? cut into the oldest and we think it's probably something like 400 B.C. C. that's right phil that's it tony have a good time it's cracking I've hit the ground again we're buying some lovely pottery to date it too and It's not every day I get to say this but we're actually digging a third prehistoric building located here. This impressive structure was built in the later Iron Age, around AD 100. Can I go into a building like this is called a wheelhouse because it had a central living room and rooms that radiated out like the spokes of a wheel, so what is this for?
It's like a guardhouse or something. This is actually the reception area. guard cell but I think it is much more likely that this is where you put on your hat and coat and take off your wet boots and then I go down here is this the entrance yes so now you are entering the building itself yes , and I think this is where the door would have been if you look both ways yeah you'll see there's a couple of little holes so you have one there that's right and you see there's no one behind you so if you'd like to close the door door you can put a wooden beam there and then I have a beam over there and there's another one over there another over here and it looks like we've got a third over there but what's really impressive about this particular wheelhouse is its size we remember it kon the main room in the middle should be between 25 and 35 square I think one of the interesting aspects is that they probably took more people to build it than would have actually lived in it so it suggests that some people have a status It's high social that you can actually call on others to provide the labor so this could be a really fancy version of the roundhouse that Phil is digging up there oh so much so this is a great design for period, this is the largest wheelhouse ever discovered on these islands and must have looked even more impressive when it was built some two thousand years ago.
As we walk through the door, we can see the large living space in the center of the building with up to six small rooms radiating from it. This impressive building may have been the manor house of its day and has to be the best prehistoric building we have ever excavated our salvage operation has revealed so much prehistoric archeology that we have our work cut to r record it all before the end of the dig. This is a rather fragile but complete prehistoric pot that is, by the way, going back to the labs for further investigation. If you visit the weather team website, you can find out what happened to some of the finds. after digging and seeing a lot more of the prehistoric barrier you're done so phil we're mick we had a good ride right at the end and i'll tell you what we saved the best for last very cool this is the real gem oh geez huh is that a precious bone pen?
Yeah, they've done it with an animal bow and you can see the surface there, that's right, it's a sheep's forearm, yeah, basically and presumably it's for poking holes in leather or something. that's right they said they were bone tools but that's the first we've seen anyway it's a beauty though yeah afantastic crushing plus the wealth of iron age archaeology we have now excavated a total of six bronze age burials in this area and the latest news here is that there is more to add to the story of this woman of the bronze age, jackie believes that the angle of the skull suggests that her head rested on a pillow when she was laid in the tomb nearly 4,000 years ago, a kissed burial that we also know was covered with something like animal skin is a very different idea than putting a body in a hole and covering it up it's almost like they're hoping maybe the dead will walk so we're getting insight into these practices the way of life that in some ways make you feel like you're almost sitting by the graveside watching this happen and that's what's so excellent the quality of the archeology is something we really don't find in the rest of britain and northern europe it's almost the end of the e xcavation and I want our experts to help me imagine the landscape here in prehistoric times when the lady in jackie's burial was alive here in the bronze age what the sand would have looked like it was already here and probably has this kind of grassland above and behind it from us the sea may have been very far away maybe up to a kilometer or even more the sea levels were lower in prehistoric times so there would be even more maca grassland than there is today but how are they using the soil sandy here?
Good grazing over all, but it's also very easy to grow, of course, it's very light. They pick up their trash. they compost it with seaweed so they can turn it into pretty good arable land and very easy to convert without, of course, the benefit of a proper plough. These tall sand dunes were not here in prehistoric times around 1700 B.C. they looked more like this and surprisingly what we found in the sand were the traces left by a craft, a prehistoric plow, a telltale sign that they were cultivating the sandy fields here in the early bronze age, but the picture changes to the half.
In the Bronze Age when we know that these fields were used as burial area with a kiss dug into the sandy soil, we do not find any trace of Bronze Age roundhouses, although there must be a few nearby, but early Bronze Age. iron around 500 B.C. I know there was a group of roundhouses here a small settlement with people who farmed and hunted a settlement that in the later iron age around 100 AD. we know it included my favorite building of this excavation the huge wheelhouse when i first got here my idea of ​​what the hebrides was going to be like in prehistory there were a few people clinging to a rock trying not to get swept into the sea and over the years I think my perception changed completely when I realized that they were leading a very comfortable life that they were doing very well thank you

If you have any copyright issue, please Contact