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The Battle of Midway: Turning the Tide of World War II

May 05, 2024
Midway Atoll is a small group of volcanic islands located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and today is home to about 40 scientists studying its unique birds in endangered marine life, but almost 80 years ago the islands were home to some of the fiercest naval

battle

s. of the second

world

war fought between the united states and imperial japan the

battle

of

midway

is often referred to as a

turning

point for the allies in the pacific theater a decisive blow to the japanese navy that changed the

tide

of the war well Join us today as we explore the technology, battle planning and a bit of luck that secured the Allies their historic victory in June 1942.
the battle of midway turning the tide of world war ii
To fully understand the Midway Battle, it is important to understand what happened seven months Before, in December 1941, with luck, the US Pacific Fleet in a preemptive strike Japan launched a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, a US naval base in Hawaii, although the fighting only lasted 90 minutes, United States The United States suffered heavy losses, including four battleships sunk and nearly 200 aircraft lost and more than 2,000 casualties in the following days. The United States declared war on Japan, Germany and Italy joined the Allied powers. There are several reasons why the United States was not as prepared for an attack on Hawaii, but one of the main reasons was that its weapons, ammunition, and aircraft were not on 24/7 alert for an imminent raid.
the battle of midway turning the tide of world war ii

More Interesting Facts About,

the battle of midway turning the tide of world war ii...

As they were not yet officially at war with any nation when the attack began, the ships were docked and the planes were sitting ducks in hangars and runways with sailors and pilots struggling to reach their defensive positions with comparatively light losses on the side. Japanese. The attack was a major morale boost for Japan, which had just seen the possibility of defeating the Americans and having unrivaled control over the Pacific, but with war officially declared, the US war machine was now firing on all cylinders. speed with the 21 ships that were sunk. or damaged in the attack, all but three were later raised for repair and returned to service, USS West Virginia, for example, was hit by seven torpedoes, two bombs and eventually sank, but returned to service before the end of war, shipyards and oil.
the battle of midway turning the tide of world war ii
Reserves near Pearl Harbor were not attacked in the raid, so many surviving aircraft were repaired and ready within weeks. Another important note is that the three aircraft carriers of the US Pacific Fleet, Lexington Saratoga and Enterprise, were fortunately absent from Pearl Harbor at the time. of the attack and were immediately ready for battle after the declaration of war four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States counterattacked Japan under the name Operation Doolittle. 16 B-25 bombers took off from an aircraft carrier and bombed strategic military targets in Tokyo and some surrounding cities, 15 of the American bombers were destroyed in the attack and the 16th in an emergency landing in the Soviet Union, where they were quickly confiscated, although the crew was eventually returned to Allied territory, but despite the loss of aircraft and with minimal damage.
the battle of midway turning the tide of world war ii
Actual damage to Japanese resources. The attack was considered a success. It raised morale in the United States and exposed Japan's weak defenses around its main island, but more importantly it pushed the Imperial Japanese Navy to counterattack the United States and end its attack plans mid-course. At the head of the Imperial Japanese Navy, Admiral Isaraku Yamamoto became increasingly anxious about the rapidity with which America's naval forces were growing, knowing that given enough time the US Navy would simply be too powerful. To fight Yamamoto, he reasoned that Japan needed to defeat the US Pacific Fleet as soon as possible in a decisive battle, but with Pearl Harbor's defenses at their highest point, the Japanese were understandably reluctant to return, Instead, the

midway

atoll was selected for this major battle, as the Japanese assumed the United States would defend the islands. at full strength, but they would be out of range of air support from the Hawaiian Islands, leaving American ships more vulnerable to stupid Japanese bombers.
The Japanese plan to invade Midway was quite complicated. The day before the attack on Midway, a separate Japanese force was to head north. and invade the Aleutian Islands near Alaska. This was a complementary attack to the main invasion of Midway and was intended to protect Japan from a flank across the North Pacific and also have a launching point from which Japan could attack targets on the western coast of the United States. In the future, some historians also believed that it was also intended to draw a large number of American forces away from Midway, further weakening the islands.
The attack on Midway would occur in three phases. The first phase was under the command of Vice Admiral Chuchi Nagumo, who with his first carrier strike force would sail halfway from the northwest and in the early morning hours would send hundreds of aircraft from several carriers to neutralize the defenses located on the islands; They were also instructed to avoid damaging the islands' runways if possible as the Japanese wanted to use them after occupying half of the road after the airstrikes had eliminated much of the island's defenses, the second phase of the attack would approach. halfway from the southwest, where transport ships would land approximately 5,000 troops on the beaches, who would extinguish any remaining resistance on the islands and take control of the airfields once the American forces stationed halfway were neutralized by the first two phases, the first carrier strike force of the first phase would engage any reinforcements sent from nearby bases and Admiral Yamamoto would be behind the battle ready to attack Japan's most powerful battleships if he saw the need after taking control of Midway Japan would continue the momentum of their victory by destroying the rest of the US Pacific Fleet and forcing a surrender on paper it seemed like a perfect attack after the entire three phase offensive on the islands main forces from multiple directions while distracting the Americans in the north could not fail, but the Imperial Japanese Navy was working with some disadvantages, firstly, it suspected that the Allies were listening to its communications throughout the attack. was to be carried out in strict radio silence, this meant that the separate attacking forces would have to carry out their part of the attack with precision, all without any communication between the groups, plus the ground forces that were going to take the islands would do it.
They would do so with almost no knowledge of its disposition. In March of that year, just a few months before the battle, a reconnaissance plane flew towards the halfway point in an attempt to take aerial photographs of the island, but the plane was intercepted and shot down. Without these photographs, the ground forces were heading. having to rely on old, probably obsolete, maps of the island's layout and had no real idea of ​​how many troops awaited them. Finally, the Japanese assumed that the United States would not be waiting for the attack, but they were wrong, Allied code breakers.
He had already been listening to Japanese broadcasts for months and had determined that the Japanese were preparing for their next naval offensive and were planning a Japanese invasion of a code-named location because there was much debate in the navy about the true meaning of af. But Commander Joseph Rochefort of the US Navy Combat Intelligence Unit was confident he had solved the mystery. Early that year two Japanese bombers were heard saying that they had passed and that the only notable island near them was halfway to the atoll to prove it to his superiors. who were still skeptical that Midway was the next target Midway was to send a radio transmission in plain English saying they were running out of water, sure enough, intercepted Japanese transmissions showed reports that AF was low on water and American military officials were now Aware that midway was the next objective of the entire Japanese force, their Federals became the Pacific's top priority.
Admiral Chester Nimitz, Commander in Chief of the United States Pacific Fleet, faced some problems while planning his Midway Defensive Many of its sailors and pilots were relatively new and had little or no combat experience and much of the Navy force was still recovering from the attack on Pearl Harbor knowing that they could be at a disadvantage both in numbers and In experience, Admiral Nimitz decided to use one of Japan's signature tactics against them, an ambush which is correct. a surprise attack on the surprise attack the plan was to attack the first phase attack group while their planes were bombing the islands with the Japanese forces separated into distant groups the hope was that they would be too far away to support each other before reaching the middle of path, this, combined with advanced knowledge of the Japanese navy's location and time of arrival, would give the Americans their best chance of repelling the invasion.
The United States gathered its forces as best it could, which consisted of three aircraft carriers, 15 destroyers, eight cruisers, 16 submarines, and more. 350 aircraft deployed from carriers or airfield to midway One of Yorktown's carriers had been significantly damaged during the attack on Pearl Harbor when a 250-pound bomb penetrated its deck before exploding, but its repairs were worked on overtime to prepare for Midway through the battle, in early June 1942, all of these forces had reached their positions near the islands, narrowly avoiding the Japanese submarines that had failed to detect the fleet and subsequently failed to warn to Japan's attacking force along with ships and the US Marines had been transferred to the islands and had been hard at work setting up fortifications to defend against the ground forces that would soon assault the beach.
On June 3, a group of reconnaissance aircraft and 9 B-17 bombers sighted the naval force consisting of the transport ships and their supporting warships southwest of Midway, the bombers reported direct hits on four of the ships. , although it was later revealed that none of them hit and no damage was caused at the same time as the Japanese forces in the north began their attack. invasion of the aleutian islands this battle possibly deserves its own video here on wara graphics it is often referred to as the forgotten battle because it is overshadowed by the battle of midway and other major pacific battles since the united states was aware of the simultaneous attack on alaska and halfway there they refrained from sending their main fleet north and a combined American and Canadian force fought fiercely to defend those islands now, halfway there, the first phase of the invasion was underway on the night of June the first force The third nagumo's attack had encountered dense fog on its way halfway from the northwest, which was both an advantage and a disadvantage.
Nagumo was unable to fly reconnaissance planes ahead of his fleet, but on the other hand assumed that he still had the element of surprise on his side and the fog would further conceal his approach. It was at this time that Admiral Yamamoto, who was overseeing the invasion of the Yamato and her supporting fleet a few hundred miles from Nagumo, noticed something rather strange, although they had not broken the Allied code, but Japanese intelligence had reported a sudden Increased American radio communications as their ships approached midway, this indicated the possibility that the United States was already aware of the impending attack, but Yamamoto chose to keep his radio silence strictly ordered and allowed The attack will continue at 4:30 a.m. m. on June 4.
The fog had cleared and Nagumo began the first attack launching squadrons from their aircraft carriers to attack halfway the first wave consisted of 108 aircraft 36 Aichi D3A dive bombers 36 B5N Kate torpedo bombers and 36 Mitsubishi Zero fighter escorts If you want to learn more about the mitsubishi By the way, zero recently covered it on my megaprojects channel. Nagumo, always ready for the unexpected, had also reserved a few dozen aircraft on his carriers in case he needed them to defend against the American ships, but with the fog clearing, American reconnaissance planes were able to detect them. an incoming threat at 5:30 a high-altitude patrol aircraft glimpsed the incoming ships through a break in the clouds and 15 minutes later a second reconnaissance pilotreported over his radio that many ships were heading to midcourse not wanting to repeat the mistakes made at Pearl Harbor where so many planes had been destroyed before they could even leave the runway, all midcourse planes were being ordered to start their engines and be ready to take off at any time and a squadron of B-17 bombers had been deployed to intercept the troop transports.
Arriving from the southwest just before 6 a.m., Navy radar picked up its first signals of incoming enemy aircraft, placing them 93 miles from the halfway point. Deployed reconnaissance pilots were ordered to find safer islands and avoid the middle of the road when re

turning

and fighters took off to intercept the arriving Japanese. planes and prevent them from reaching the halfway point along with these planes the bombers originally sent to attack the troop transports were ordered to change course and instead head northwest with the fighters where they would bomb Nagumo's carrier fleet From the beginning the American fighters had the odds against them with two planes patrolling very far away when the orders were received and one plane with engine problems, the squadron had been reduced to 23 fighters that needed to intercept more than 70 bombers with 36 fighters from escort, not only that 20 of the American fighters were bruce to buffalos which had already proven to be inferior in combat to the Japanese zeros when in 1941 the British and Dutch forces suffered substantial losses with them in Southeast Asia, in fact, the marines of The United States had already nicknamed the plane the Flying Coffin and it was soon mostly scrapped by the Navy several years ago.
More planes took off from the halfway point following closely behind the first group a quarter of an hour after six captains, John F. Kerry, flying an F4F Wildcat, spotted the incoming plane below him through the clouds as the American fighters flew at an altitude 3,000 feet higher than the Japanese. The Nagumo formation fleet had no radar capabilities, meaning they were unaware of the interceptors lurking above them waiting to attack. Noting that the escort Zeros were flying above and behind the bombers, the American pilots launched into steep dives targeting the Japanese bombers. The ambush. He was initially successful and several bombers were destroyed when the buffaloes suddenly emerged from the cloud cover firing their machine guns, but the

tide

quickly turned in favor of the Japanese.
The Mitsubishi Zeros were faster and more agile than Bruce to Buffaloes and today they were also outnumbered by 16 American planes. They were quickly shot down as soon as the Japanese escorts moved to defend their bombers, Captain Carrie was wounded and flew back halfway using the clouds as cover and finally survived the main parks that had taken off just after the initial squadron was forced to eject from its aircraft. after he was damaged, but while parachuting to a nearby island, Zero shot and killed him. Witnessing such a gruesome death likely saved another pilot's life. Captain merrell. Captain Merrill's plane caught fire after receiving dozens of shots and ejected.
His plane at 8,000 feet, once the heat from the flames reached his cockpit, delayed deploying his parachute until he fell quite far and landed in the ocean about halfway there. Fortunately, Navy torpedo bombers had been deployed around the islands to pick up the downed pilots and he was quickly rescued. Overall, the fighters intended to intercept the bombers had barely made a dent in the Japanese formation with air support from midway almost neutralized the marines stationed on the island prepared to defend against the incoming bombers with anti-aircraft guns and soon the Japanese Kate torpedo bombers arrived on the island, the Kates, whose main objective was to eliminate the planes stationed on the island, just as they did At Pearl Harbor, they were surprised to find none on the island, instead taking aim at their secondary targets, anti-aircraft guns and other buildings and structures.
The second wave. of the Japanese bombers, this time the dive bombers that would target airfields began their attack with something quite strange according to the marines on the island, the lead Japanese plane descended to an altitude of only thirty meters and, turning around, slowly flew over the island In a show of bravado some even say the pilot put his thumb to his nose Confused troops stared at the plane for a few seconds before a Marine interrupted the show and shot it down That was the only dive bomber destroyed in that attack While The bombers caused significant damage to the base midway, including destroying an anti-aircraft gun and hitting some large oil tanks, causing a massive explosion on one of the islands.
They did not damage the base to the point that it would be unusable. The American bombers were still able to land to refuel. and rearmament and camouflage had protected many of the anti-aircraft guns from direct hits. The Zeros who strafed the island after the bombers finished reported that there was still heavy anti-aircraft fire and one of the pilots, Lieutenant Tominaga, broke radio silence and announced to Nagumo that a follow-up attack was needed at that time by the US fleet. was advancing to defend midway and Nagumo's fleet was under attack by several groups of American bombers that had taken off earlier from midway while most of these bombers did not inflict significant damage.
Nagumo himself was almost killed when a B The damaged -26 nearly crashed into the bridge of his ship before plummeting into the ocean. A squadron of obsolete and reclaimed dive bombers. A few Avenger torpedo bombers. The B-17 heavy bombers made consecutive desperate runs on the Japanese fleet, almost all of them were shot down or severely damaged by the dozens of Japanese fighters that had been deployed to surround and defend the fleet. An incredible story comes from an intrepid dive bomber piloted by a serious young ensign who, after his plane was riddled with machine gun bullets and despite bleeding from the neck, flew his very damaged bomber without a compass alone until he was able to locate Halfway through a thick plume of smoke rising from the island, this flight was not only the ensign's first combat experience but was also the first time he had flown out of sight of land.
These attack waves of various types of bombers achieved very little in terms of physical damage to the Japanese fleet, but their influence on the battle was critical. They forced the fleet into evasive maneuvers away from each other and played a pivotal role in causing Nagumo his first major mistake of the battle, as the first mid-course attacks failed to eliminate all of the defenses that the transports would soon face. they arrived Strong resistance from the US Marines as they attempted to take the island, something they had not anticipated. Nagumo agreed that a second midcourse bombardment was necessary to clear the way for his troops and ordered that the remaining Kate bombers on the carriers be stripped of their torpedoes and replaced with general-purpose bombs for a ground attack, but these bombers simply could not take off with the constant bombardment of American aircraft despite not having fighter escorts with them.
Nagumo was forced to keep his carrier's runways clear to refuel and rearm his zeros to defend the fleet, meaning the remaining bombers were essentially trapped in the carrier's lower levels, suddenly a patrol plane sent a message. alarming to nagumo. The American warships had just been spotted about 200 miles away and were approaching the Japanese fleet, Nagumo now faced a possible battle at sea. He was forced to partially reverse his previous order and announced that the Kates that had already been rearmed with regular bombs could keep them, but the Kates that had their torpedoes equipped needed to remain that way.
Nagumo now faced three problems: the urgency of launching a second attack midway, the need to defend his fleet from incoming American ships and somehow recover all the planes that were returning midway and needed to be refueled and rearmed. This was overwhelming for Nagumo and his officers who did not expect such a brave resistance. Their fears only grew when the pilot of the patrol radioed again that the American warships were also supported by an aircraft carrier, the USS Hornet, realizing the danger. As his fleet was in Nagumo he ordered that all available bombers be equipped with torpedoes and prepared to attack the enemy fleet, the rest of his fighters were still circling the fleet to protect the four aircraft carriers that left filled with planes full of fuel. , fully armed and therefore fully explosive around 8:30, while many of the bombers were still armed with torpedoes below deck.
Approximately 70 remaining aircraft from the first midcourse bombardment had returned and, having not been cleared to land, most were circling the carriers in hopes of being cleared to land before running out of fuel and having to dive into the ocean, which that some of them what they had to do Nagumo had to quickly decide whether to immediately send his bombers to the American fleet, which would delay the landing of the returning plane, or wait and recover the returning plane, delaying the counterattack on the ships of American war that was at this point. As Nagumo made his next fatal mistake under pressure to make a quick decision, he ordered that instead of immediately launching the prepared bombers against the approaching American fleet, each of his four aircraft carriers should receive the returning aircraft, both bombers and fighters. , and prepare them to join the American fleet.
To fight American warships, one of his main motivations for this order was to witness how quickly the first attacks by American bombers were doomed to fail without a fighter escort, emphasizing the need for his agile zeros to accompany the bombers on their way to the American fleet at 9 a.m. the Japanese. The carriers had finished recovering the returning aircraft and the gumo decided that boarding the American fleet was a higher priority than a second bombardment mid-course and ordered his fleet to turn sharply to the northwest and regroup to prepare for a massive attack on the American aircraft carrier. and is escorting the warships, the four aircraft carriers were now in a frenzy rushing to refuel, rearm and repair their planes for the impending fight, if they could gather forces and launch their planes, this would be a victorious day for Japan, but unfortunately for Nagumo, the Americans also had a few tricks up their sleeves and a little luck on their side.
The first problem for Japan was its lack of knowledge of enemy movement without radar on its ships. In this case they relied heavily on reconnaissance aircraft to locate and identify enemy formations. Reconnaissance planes had failed to identify the second and third American aircraft carriers, the USS Enterprise and the USS Yorktown, but this lack of knowledge was a disadvantage shared by both sides in the war in knowing the moment that Nogumo's fleet had attacked. halfway to Rear Admiral Spurrence and Fletcher. It was estimated that around 8:30 a.m. The Japanese planes would return to their carriers, which would be an optimal time to attack the fleet, but they were operating under the assumption that the Japanese were unaware of the approaching American fleet and no one knew that Nagumo had changed course in anticipation of In a naval battle, torpedo boats and escort fighters were unknowingly launched from the Enterprise and Hornet toward the intended location of the Japanese fleet, but they reached nothing but open sea, causing many of the planes to return to their carriers. . or fly halfway to refuel.
Some logistical problems on the aircraft carriers had also caused the US some problems, as the newly trained and largely inexperienced crew spent time preparing each aircraft for launch, meaning that the vt-8 torpedo squadron a group of 15 devastating douglas were launched. Long ahead of their fighter escorts who ultimately failed to reach them on their own with no fighters for cover and flying even more old, obsolete bombers, Lieutenant Commander John Waldron led his squadron in a northwesterly direction until they found Nagumo's fleet once but he was no rival. for the zeros, all their planes were shot down beforethat even a single torpedo was launched.
This attack was followed by another squadron of torpedo boats from USS Yorktown who, despite being escorted by fighters, were so outnumbered that they didn't stand much of a chance. and all but two of these torpedo boats were shot down, the squadron managed to fire a few torpedoes but they either failed to detonate or were cleverly evaded by the Japanese ships, but these attacks followed by rather disorganized consecutive runs by other squadrons achieved the same thing. As before, they forced the carrier's decks to deal with refueling and rearming zeros for defense while their bombers remained helpless below deck.
At this point in the battle, 30 intrepid dive bombers from Enterprise emerged from their cloud cover and began racing toward two of the carriers, like many other squadrons, had been lost and were running out of fuel, but led by Wade McClaskey They managed to detect a Japanese cruiser and followed it back to the enemy fleet. In a moment of luck, the Zeros that were supposed to be protecting the aircraft carrier were distracted by another squadron of torpedo boats from Yorktown and McClaskey and their squadron did not hesitate to take advantage of the moment, swooping down and aiming their sights at the aircraft carrier that the crew of the Japanese aircraft carriers had been preparing so hastily.
Aircraft that, on the one hand, were not manning the anti-aircraft guns and, on the other, had left unequipped bombs in stacks instead of storing them properly while they refitted the bombers with torpedoes, this spelled disaster for the Kaiger, which was defenseless against McCluskey. and his squadron's bombs which devastated the zeros on the upper deck and hit a gas canister, a fire soon broke out throughout the bridge and, as one witness later said, ten minutes after the attack I saw a large explosion on the center of the ship with flame rockets. Pieces of steel were bolted upward to about three or four thousand feet in the air at the same time that Lieutenant Best separated from McCluskey's formation and flew with his companions towards another aircraft carrier, the Akagi.
Here the pilots again encountered no resistance on their way to the ship and 16 Yorktown's torpedo boats had reached a third carrier, the Soyu, in what seemed like the blink of an eye. Three of the powerful Japanese aircraft carriers had been reduced to ashes. Nagumo's decision to keep the plane below deck and hastily change its ammunition essentially turned the ships into floating kegs of gunpowder, sitting there waiting for a match to strike. That night all three carriers had sunk into the ocean, but the fourth aircraft carrier, hey, which had been separated from the others during evasive maneuvers, was outraged by the loss. of the other ships and immediately counterattacked after the American bombers took a first course to return to their carriers.
Here 18 dive bombers were launched with six zero escorts to follow them when radar detected the incoming threat, many of the dive bombers were intercepted and shot down by fighters but some penetrated the ship's defenses and three hits were recorded on the USS Yorktown Two They exploded on the deck causing minimal damage but the third penetrated the deck and disabled the ship's boilers leaving it practically immobile but as the hereu prepared to launch its second attack on the yorktown the crew had worked frantically to get the pier in working order. and were able to get it running again after a few hours, just before launching the next wave of torpedo boats to attack the Yorktown, Admiral Yamaguchi finally received the news that there were not one but three American aircraft carriers in the vicinity despite this, without having Taking into account the well-being of his ship or his men, he ordered the attacks to continue.
The second attack despite encountering heavy anti-aircraft artillery and defensive fighters was successful in sinking Yorktown with several torpedoes leaving his commanding officer with no other option but to order his crew to abandon ship when only a few planes from this attack returned intact, the hero against all odds decided to wait until nightfall to launch another attack against the remaining Americans. determined to avenge the Yorktown, Enterprise and Hornet were determined to sink the Hey You and launched a combined 40 dive bombers to locate and destroy her. At 5 in the afternoon they found it and while the other planes were distracting the escorting the warships, 13 bombers aimed their sights at the aircraft carrier, dropped their bombs and left the ship completely in flames, although the ship could still move, the fires were spreading and out of control and the crew was sure the ship was going to sink Yamaguchi ordered his men to abandon ship and chose to stay on board and die with his aircraft carrier knowing that the ship was unsalvageable.
Nearby Japanese destroyers fired torpedoes at their last carrier and left it to be claimed by the Pacific rear of the main fleet that had been too far away to help. Admiral Nagumo Yamamoto realized that he needed to take advantage of his last opportunity with the American fleet and capture Midway Island and decided that a night raid would be most effective during the early hours of June 5. Yamamoto was again deceived when the Americans had anticipated a follow-up. The overnight attack had temporarily withdrawn his forces to the east seeing that his quick plan had failed, he called off the entire attack midway and began to withdraw, but this would not be the last of his misfortunes that day, two heavy cruisers The Japanese, the Mikuma and the Megani had been deployed to approach midway and fire at the airfields when the operation was suddenly canceled by Yamamoto.
They began to withdraw at full speed when they saw an American submarine pursuing them and prepared to fire torpedoes taking evasive maneuvers in the darkness while trying to dodge the torpedoes, the two ships collided with each other causing severe damage and slowing the ships, the Japanese navy sent two destroyers to escort the injured ships and fall back into Japanese waters seeing these two cruisers heavy as easy targets, the Enterprise and the Hornets launched three bombing raids on them. They managed to sink the Makuma. When the fighting seemed to have ended, the Americans returned to the place where the Yorktown was bombed and were surprised to find it still floating in the hope that it could One tug and several destroyers began to remove the flooded carrier back to Hawaii, but this commotion caught the attention of a Japanese reconnaissance aircraft and, eager to avenge their last carriers, a submarine was deployed and successfully sank the ship.
Yorktown and one of its destroyer escorts as it was towed back to Pearl. Harbor Nearly 40 Japanese men were taken prisoner midway through the battle and were held at Pearl Harbor until the end of the war, while the three American airmen captured by the Japanese were brutally executed. The Midway Battle was a colossal defeat for the Japanese navy. Without even achieving the objectives of the operation, they lost four aircraft carriers, more than 300 aircraft and hundreds of trained pilots, sailors and repairmen. The military was so ashamed of the defeat that they hid the news from the public and even isolated survivors of the campaign from their families, so what went wrong in the attack and how could it have ended differently?
To begin with, the Japanese attack plan was too complex; dividing the attacking fleets into multiple groups had only served to isolate them from each other. Second, the Japanese were working under too many assumptions. one of which was that the Americans were going to be caught off guard by the mid-course attack, this would not have had such an impact if the groups had not been under such strict radio silence during the first critical hours of the battle and from the scattered responses of the American fighters they probably could have discovered that the Americans were prepared. The Japanese were also surprised by the courage and determination of the American pilots, as they had been told that the Americans would be cowardly and weak in combat.
It must have been a shock to them. see squadrons of torpedo boats fly directly towards nagumo's fleet without any fighter escort the brave act that forced nagumo to keep her decks busy for her fighters the battle could have turned out very differently if the japanese had put all their strength into attacking mid road to yamamoto by For example, he didn't even see combat during the Battle of Midways, he was hundreds of miles from the fighting, but he was aboard the yamato which, along with her sister ship, the musashi, was the heaviest battleship ever built and could have led the reserve fleet to victory if they had instead teamed up with Nagumo, trusting that Nagumo would defeat the American fleet.
He had stayed behind until it was too late to interfere. If Japan had defeated the defending American fleet halfway, they would have had a foothold in the middle of the Pacific from which to. They could have advanced towards Hawaii in more recent years some of the sunken ships from the battle have been located the Yorktown was found in 1998 at a depth of 16,000 feet surprisingly intact and in 2019 the remains of the two Japanese aircraft carriers the Akagi and the Kaiger They were found at a total depth of eighteen thousand feet with losses so devastating that the Japanese navy was permanently weakened and they struggled to replace experienced military personnel who had died.
The Battle of Midway showed the importance of wartime intelligence and the deciphering of codes and the dangers of The overconfidence and unnecessary complexity that paralyzed the Japanese fleet midcourse along with a few other victories in the following months, such as the Guadalcanal campaign, gave the United States the impetus it needed to retreat and take the lead for the rest of the war. Japan never launched another Major Attack in the Pacific making a desperate defense until its surrender in 1945, so I really hope you found the video interesting. If so, hit the approve button below. Don't forget to subscribe if you have any suggestions for a future war.
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