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The Battle of Agincourt - Medieval Dead - History Documentary

Apr 18, 2024
In northern France, a torn and isolated English force prepares to fight its way to safety by blocking the way. It is the best army

medieval

France has ever assembled. The French nobles are confident of victory and feel that nothing can oppose them, but on this October day in 1415 they will not. will be yours six centuries later, experts are now examining what we really know about one of the most famous events of the Middle Ages, the Battle of Ainor. They believe Ainor is about bravery, but it's also about glory. Somewhere around here there are thousands of

dead

in

battle

. of ainur and discover how that day became the most terrible disaster the French nobility has ever known.
the battle of agincourt   medieval dead   history documentary
They have no idea that they are actually fighting for their lives. The

medieval

world from the 5th to the 15th century. A team of archaeologists investigated the medieval life of Ates. Exploring the world of the medieval

dead

we get a classic storybook view of medieval life we ​​don't hear the stories about the common man trying to keep his family alive in our tents there are hundreds, if not thousands, of skeletons, archaeologically speaking, We can now focus on the medieval dead, you are looking for clues in the skeleton all the time and you couldn't help but almost look through their eyes thinking what did they see, look how they died, this unfortunate

battle

was fought between the villages of Aenor and Rovil in the year of Our Lord 1415 on the day of St Krispen and Crispinian the battle of 25 October 1415 is perhaps the best known in English

history

ainur or azanor was the great victory of Henry V that consolidated the young king's reign and turned the The tide of English fortunes in the 100 Years' War against France The story of Aenor comes to us from several contemporary sources Henry V had invaded France to recapture lands he believed were rightfully English His army besieged the port of Arur but many of his men were felled by dentry with weakened troops and winter approaching Henry turned north and headed for the English base in c a huge French army now masked to cut off the English retreat some claim up to 40 or even 60,000 knights and men-at-arms They faced Henry V An army a fraction of this number, perhaps only 5 or 6,000 The confident French knights advanced towards what they assumed would be certain glory.
the battle of agincourt   medieval dead   history documentary

More Interesting Facts About,

the battle of agincourt medieval dead history documentary...

Thousands of armed men charged forward across the narrow, narrow battlefield. They were experts with one of the deadliest weapons of the medieval era, the longbow, the English archers unleashed rain after rain of arrows on the French knights who fell into panic and chaos in the mud where they became trapped and were killed or captured in large quantities. He was the Stu of Legend and quickly formed the mythical fabric of an England with an emerging sense of nationhood. The Battle of Aiko sums up what people perceive of the medieval period in terms of battles. It was supposed to be the classic where outnumbered, few managed to win and therefore it has reached mythical proportions in terms of you know everything that is possible, it was the victory of Henry V somehow winning against all the odds.
the battle of agincourt   medieval dead   history documentary
I think Ainor is possibly in most people's minds the most famous medieval battle, especially in England because it has achieved mythical status thanks to William Shakespeare. It's the archetypal stereotypical battle, so there's the underdog, the English, who managed to win and of course the nasty French are seen off the battlefield and of course it suits the English mood. This is whatever. It is possible and this is what happened at Ainor in 1415, this is broadly the way Aenor was seen for many years and centuries, it was not even until relatively recently that historians began to investigate the actual

history

.
the battle of agincourt   medieval dead   history documentary
Professor An Curry is the world's leading expert on the documented sources related to Aenor. His starting point was the size of the two armies present in the battle. The view often assumed is that the French had a huge army of tens of thousands of men that outnumbered the small English army, but few if any researchers had We returned to existing records to verify that many members of Henry's army V were archers and we started looking for records of these men. The received wisdom was that we did not know the names of the archers who were at the battle of Ain Court.
It was thought that we knew the names of the men-at-arms because of what is known as the Court of Ain paper, which is a transcription from the early 17th century. My mission was to go to the National Archives to see all the original materials. a paid army, so we had many payment records in the exercise files. I asked my missionary to find out the names of the people on the campaign. The archives revealed how many men Henry V gathered for the campaign in France. England did not. We have a standing army at this time, however, it had enough military activity to make it possible to be a professional soldier for the court campaign, the army that was proposed to go, there we know the names of at least 7,500 people.
Of what was probably an army of over 11,000, perhaps almost 12,000, finding out exactly how many men were at the battle of 25 October 1415 is more difficult, but from An's work it can be estimated that Henry's army possibly numbering around 8 or 9,000 more than the smaller force of perhaps 5 or 6 thousand suggested in the past it also appears that the French army was not as large as many have suggested looking at the French army is much more complicated than looking at the army English we have some financial records but I just don't have that much because after all the French are on the defensive and would certainly hope to have as many troops as possible, uh, they could get from the cities and things like that, but a very useful indication is the amount of money they were raising we have a very important document where Charles I 6 ordered the raising of money to support an army of 9,000 men which was to be composed of 6,000 men-at-arms and 3,000 he tree which could include Longbow Men and crossbowmen, You immediately see the inversion that you like in the English proportion: we have two men-at-arms for every archer effectively in the French army, so I think the idea was to have an army of 9,000 troops, I would have added.
To that, maybe we could get to about 12,000, but it's really hard to see how it could have been higher than that. These ideas of 40,000 to 60,000 are simply not credible in light of the size of the French army, in this period, but they would have been heavy men-at-arms, uh, and they would have been aristocratic, but I think you have to remember that the English army was also aristocratic, there really isn't much difference, we have this idea that the English army is full of tomies. If you like being a people's army and the French army is something like that, you know Ray Henry, in fact, socially they are quite similar to each other in terms of equipment, they are very similar to each other, um, and it's also something that people also forget.
The French have also had to move great distances. Everyone misses him. It's as if they have already flown to Ain Court. Remember that they are moving long distances too. They would be tired. They will also run out of food at the end of October. In 1415 the two more evenly matched armies than previously thought were involved in a cross-country pursuit in northern France. Henry needed to lead his troops back to English-held territory. It seems that Henry, after taking half of Flur, decides to retreat to Cal all. of sources seem to agree that uh I don't think he was looking for Battle, he thought it would take eight days to get from Halfer to C, of ​​course it took much longer because they didn't dare cross the Som across the river.
Som would take time and leave the army vulnerable. The English had to try to be one step ahead. The French army is following them on the other bank and therefore it takes a long time before the English can advance and cross the river. so I think we have to say here that he is trying to escape and that the French are trying to harass him. At that moment he is afraid to face the French. Karen Watts of the British Royal Armories has studied the French army of the At the beginning of the 15th century, the French had a totally different attitude towards the coming battle, they knew it was going to happen, they thought they were going to a party, They thought they were going to a big tournament, in reality there had only been one tournament. 15 years before, a few kilometers away, the Stingel tournament was held in which the English and French faced each other during a truce in the 100 Years War and in fact the French commander of Aenor was one of the great leaders of this tournament.
St ingul Tournament 15 years earlier, the French believe they have come to a wonderful tournament dressed in their best armor, the latest in equipment for many members of the French nobility, it was the opportunity of a lifetime, they came to Aenor from all over the north from France anxious not to get lost. Capturing the fleeing English, the composition of the French army was different from that of the English, the French anticipated that the battle would be fought on foot between the Menat guns of both sides and calculated that they had the advantage of having a greater number of men in Arms the.
However, the French have a plan to send a group of cavalry against the archers to nullify the archers. They are trying to eliminate Henry's advantage, which is that he could lose the Lo arrows against the advancing French and try to damage as many of them before they do. committed to knocking them out before they can reach the English lines, it seems that the French didn't have as large a group of cavalry against the archers as they intended because the knights and nobility wanted to be in close combat, right? They saw no glory in taking down archers, they expect a glorious amount of hand-to-hand combat with the opposing English army, and above all, they expect to have hand-to-hand combat with the English nobility and, above all, the English. king, but this is unlike any tournament the French nobleman has experienced in less than an hour or two, the flower of French chivalry is decimated, this is a complete shock and surprise to his own brothers, his parents are dying before them. falling and at this point they are still trying to pretend that they are noble and chivalrous and you find several members of the high nobility offering their gauntlets as surrender because they hope to be captured, if they surrender they will be captured. they will be Ransom they will be fine they are not in much danger they are not really going to die not if they surrender these French knights they have completely misjudged and misinterpreted the battle they are in they have no idea that they are actually fighting for their lives with a high proportion of nobles fighting on the front lines of both armies, many of the French killed were aristocrats, this was unusual for a medieval battle, most deaths were usually carried out by common soldiers. a huge consequence for immediate French history because there are no heirs and France is massively weakened and decimated and unable to provide male heirs for, I would say, 50 to almost 100, it has an effect on almost a century after this battle and Curry It is believed that the numbers Contemporary accounts from both sides vary in their estimates of the number of dead, probably for political reasons, and C was a disaster for a party of in the French there were a good number of Burgundian deaths, it is extremely difficult to know the actual number of those who died, but I don't think that numbers like 5,800 given in The Chronicles of Burgundy seem as exaggerated as the numbers of troops, perhaps you know that fifteen hundred would be a reasonable figure even for the English.
I mean, some English sources imply that you know it's about 10 people, others about 400, whatever, maybe from all the things we have, all the difficulties we have. The numbers of the dead are going to be the most difficult to know, whatever the exact number. It was a very hard defeat for the French king. Henry himself claimed that God must have been with the English that day to punish French churches and cathedrals throughout England. tomb Effigies and memorials to the veterans of Aenor in France there are relatively few on the field itself there were no memorials dating from the time of the battle to this day no one knows exactly where in these fields the last place is located of rest for the many Frenchmen who died here it is this very absence of graves that caught the attention of Tim Sutherland.
He is an archaeologist and battlefield specialist. He is best known for his work on another medieval battlefield in Yorkshire, northern England. Aenor is much better known and written about the battle than Ton. When he got involved here, Tim expected his research to be relatively simple, we're entering an environment where we think we know everything, it's a classic story, Shakespeare covered it, all theRenowned historians dealing with military history are covered to a lesser extent, so we entered. there, thinking he was going to be a piece of cake, he had no idea that he had embarked on an investigation that would last more than a decade in Ton.
Tim supervised the excavation of a mass grave after its accidental discovery. He knew those graves. They had to exist here on Aenor too, but before he could excavate them he had to try to find them. In 2002, he and metal detector expert Simon Richardson carried out a major survey of the supposed battle zone they found and mapped out a series of finds, but found almost nothing of Med Evil or anything related to 1415. Tim was frustrated but he got hooked in 2007. He and Simon returned this time. The idea was to target the area around a calario or Cal near the center of the battlefield from its Tim's research discovered that the 19th century monument commemorated a local family, but also that it was on the site where they were traditionally thought to have Many of the French dead from 1415 have been buried.
When we first got here, we did some primary metal detecting surveys across the country. throughout the entire battlefield, but we also targeted the area around the calare where we were now mainly because we were initially not allowed to do any archaeological work within the enclosure area as part of the archaeological survey and during the geophysical survey we began to find geophysical anomalies of lumps and bulges, but just outside the ordeal there was a very large metal anomaly buried quite deeply below the ground surface and of course that means we considered it an area of ​​possible excavation.
The anomaly seemed to indicate a large amount of buried Ferris material. Tim had only found small AR artifacts and no armor in ton, although he was fully aware of the mass graves at Visby on Gotland where many men had been buried still in their armor, it was rare to find armor, but could it happen again here in a minor account? I suggest that Henry V buried or burned some of the armor of the defeated French to save it from the enemy. The problem was that we didn't know what this metallic anomaly was, it was huge. Ferris turned up in an archaeological geophysical survey and had to be investigated because we knew he was buried very deeply and of course there are all sorts of rumors about Henry V burying pits full of weapons and armor that he collected from the French.
In the back of your mind you think it's possibly a huge hole and contains a lot of Ferris or iron material, so of course we had to go target it and dig it out. Finally we dug a large hole deeper. down to about 3 feet deep and then we were metal detecting as we went and then beyond the depth of a shovel this F Ferris metallic anomaly showed up on the metal detector we thought this is whatever it could be an unexploded bomb. It could be a buried tractor, it could be absolutely anything and then we slowly discovered it and it was a pipe from a drilling rig that broke and was buried deep in the ground beneath our feet and it didn't make any sense at all. a steel pipe that perhaps extended hundreds of feet had created a massive Ferris signature.
One of us were very deflated and two of us didn't know what it was and then of course we talked to the owners and then one of them came up and said oh. I remember in the 1960s they were drilling here for oil and no one told us and everyone had forgotten, and that answered one of the questions about what the anomalous geophysical survey was; then, somehow, from the disappointment came the opportunity that had a KnockOn effect because Everyone felt so sorry for us that finally the owner allowed us to do some archaeological excavations inside the calvary.
It was too good an opportunity to miss and normally it wouldn't have been possible. Tim knew that this site was chosen for the Calare because it had previously been the site of a chapel that could have been built in commemoration of the tombs of 1415. It was destroyed during the French Revolution, but Tim wondered if traces of it still existed and They would possibly provide clues to the lost tombs high above. In the summer this is almost impenetrable, so the first thing we had to do was clean the entire compound, so we cleaned everything and cut everything and then we started doing a geophysical study right away.
They found evidence of war but not the type they expected, just below the surface, sometimes on the surface there were a series of metal artifacts and some of them were bullets from World War I and others were bullets from World War II and There were badges and coins and all kinds of things and basically people have been using this compound for whatever reason for the last 50 or 100 years, during the first and second world wars, so of course people have come to this site and has also visited it because it is an archaeological site of interest and everything is centered.
On this cross here, investigating this area trying to understand it is very important in terms of how it fits into the landscape of the battle. The Cals had seen a lot of history, but so far nothing seemed to relate to 1415. Undaunted, they recorded the finds on the surface and began to dig, we began by putting a large trench at the entrance because when we first entered here there was some evidence of stones that They protruded from the ground and in that ditch we found a series of stones and bricks with some cast lead. on it, which was obviously holding up the railings, so it looked like it was an entrance to something that had a metal door.
We later discovered that the postcard would actually still show a photograph of the door in situ, which is good, we tried to date it. and unfortunately it was built with the same bricks that the chapel would have been built with in the 18th century, so we couldn't really date it, so finding that photograph was quite nice because it looked more like a 19th century entrance. They simply used old building materials that probably lay around the site encouraged by 18th century remains. They kept digging expecting to find the medieval tombs at any moment, but again, it was not so simple in each place where we put a test drill bit inside the enclosure.
We went down to almost pure ground, there was nothing in it, a few fragments of brick and very little else, there is certainly no archaeological evidence of human remains or living wells that have ever contained human remains within this enclosure, that is very strange because everyone thought so and then we have this anomaly: where are the French dead from Aino? Tim had to look for other evidence, other clues in the history of this area that could open a new line of investigation, that's when he discovered that someone else had been there before him. this time he had been following in the footsteps of another archaeologist and possibly the first battlefield archaeologist in 1818.
Lieutenant Colonel John Woodford was a British officer who served in the occupation army after Napoleon's defeat at Watero and was interested throughout his life in history. Woodford took the opportunity when he was stationed nearby to carry out his own investigations at the site of this famous battlefield. The only person we know who excavated archaeologically in this area is John George Woodford and that was in 1818 and he also came after the battle of the war with a troop of men of about 60 apparently and carried out some archaeological excavations and found graves massive and in the massive tombs with gold coins or arrowheads, iron fragments that he describes and Drew and uh and obviously related to the Battle of Aenor and these were the dead from the battle of aenor now of course the problem Now it's just that we don't know where he dug, the excavation site was long lost, after all there was almost no record of it ever taking place, the artifacts Woodford found.
It seems to have also been lost in England. Tim follows the trail to find out more. No one before him has tried to put all these pieces together in the War County archive. He has found some vital clues. He has been drawn here by a series of letters from a collection that belongs to the nigate family somehow this included a series of letters that woodford wrote during his excavations in aenor the nudie gate collection this comes from is one of our largest collections okay the nud gates would have known, you know to many families. That's a pretty important family and clearly I think they were a family that was very interested in history, culture and art, which may have explained them being interested in this material.
They probably would have been interested to see the cards related to Ain so obviously. Yes, before and after his time in Ainor, he was quite prolific in writing to his brother, so they were very close, so of course, obviously, he is passing on the excitement of the findings to his brother and calling him my darling. Which one is he was Alexander and then he was saying you know what he's been finding etc etc. so there's his name John George Woodford yes to my dearest yes June 19th yes, so he's writing, it's WR writing to his brother that day after the battle 400 years after Aeno in 185, Lieutenant Colonel Woodford and his brother, Major Alexander Woodford, survived the largest battle of their time.
Watero, if you survived the Battle of Watero. One of the first things you do is write home and tell your parents. and to your brother, to everyone else, that you are fine, but it is the letters under three years later, in 1818, that Tim wants to see, they are the records of the only other excavation on the battlefield that describes the only finds known that have been made, including the gold echu so this is one of Woodford's letters yes, this is the one that interests me a lot because the sketch of the coin here and this was one of the coins that George Woodford found during the excavations , so this gold coin that Woodford is describing here on February 20, 1818, this is while he is doing the excavations at Tajín Cour and he is writing to his brother and he has done a little bit, quite well, actually, yes, and then This currency began to have a life of its own and disappeared.
In an archive of another manor house, as far as I know, these two drawings are the only record of what Woodford found during his excavations. It is a primary document. It is also an archaeological document because these sketches tell you exactly the size. and the way and this is all we have now of any information relating to the Woodford excavations in 1818 and everything else, the exact description of how we found it, where we found it, it's all gone remember the mystery, yes, this It's what I've been chasing and it's really nice to see this in person so obviously it's taken a lot of time to do it and I was obviously very proud of it because it says in the letter you won't believe my eyes.
I found several gold coins when these letters were there, we focused on the details that Woodford was providing, I mean he was making quite detailed notes, diaries and things like that, and that's what we do today as archaeologists. Woodford's excavation at Aenor caused controversy. among some French locals because what they saw was the looting of the graves, the letters show that their intention was always to give the bones a proper reburial now the French say that the Duke of Wellington ordered Woodford to leave, but we know which Wellington asks very politely, please, you know you're making too much of a fuss, please leave the area rather frustratingly, there's no scale to this, no, so he says it's limiting.
I have ordered a sarcophagus Or, yes, for the bones. Yes, it is now. is it that big or is it a suitable sarcophagus is it the size of a coffin one would suggest it is a little larger if the sarcophagus would suggest a suitable burial container yes he has provided the design and dimensions elsewhere right ? the mayor and cury will deposit them in the courtyard of a minor church MH, so he even clarified it with uh, with the church, he said well, basically, can I put them back in the cemetery? and he says and they say yes, he is doing the right thing for everyone. as you can do and then we hear later from the French that this box that Woodford had ordered is so finally the bones are collected, put in this box and then buried in the cemetery in the right place, but this is not the general story that the general story is available he was a bit bad, yes, and he was, he was obviously putting down the French name and the French character and leaving Bones Here There and Everywhere, yes, it's a pure French twist, we know from these lyrics that It was Woodford who instigated this and the French always claimed they did it right.
He was going to make a marble stone memorial piece with a date of 1415. Something very simple he says so it's not glorifying, you know? side, yeah, uh, just like a simpleMemorial and then he says all this and he writes to his brother and his brother was very religious so he's not going to blatantly lie to him, he might have embellished the truth a little bit, but he's basically telling him what he was planning to do uh so this it's again this is an important document because it gives one person's opinion and he's obviously dead and his opinion has been swept away uh you know, despised and almost you know distorted beyond recognition, but having the main document saying what he thought about his own brother is fantastic.
I think Tim believes the letters aren't the only thing Woodford may have left behind. There is an excavation diary accompanying this right which explains in great detail how he did the work at Ainor. he dug up what he found, how he recorded it and where it all went, including more annotated sketches and of course that diary, the excavation diary, is missing, unfortunately the DI you refer to is not there because he would have kept it himself. or the family has kept it and this is the detective side of the story and it's about unraveling the truth and that's why I like it because I like facts as an archaeologist.
I like to look at the facts and the facts are that he has made a nice little drawing that has the drawing of the coin, the arrowhead, he is trying to do well what he is doing by recording it and that is as an archaeologist, that is all. what we do today, we take photographs, we record it and, uh, and because we're destroying the primary evidence, so seeing the primary evidence from 1818 is fascinating, but it still doesn't get us any closer to where this diary is. Sim then finds a clue to what might have happened to the missing diary related When the items from the collection were stored in London, someone made a note and this is much later, yes, and it says that John Woodford re-digged the field of Ainor and everything she found was lost in the burning of the Pannan.
The Pannic was the original storage. The house over there is where we get the name Pant Technic Van and that was the name Pannic, it was the original storage house in London and apparently everything burned down and it was like a strange, not only was it a storage place, but obviously like people. bought and sold, it's almost like some kind of antiques trading place and this m is starting to make sense now, but someone actually graded this and why they put it here, I don't know because these letters survive, one of the gold coins survives, so everything was It was not lost, no, clearly not, so every time the file entered the technical pants it must have already been separated, yes, well, this material was sent to your brother, wasn't it?
This could have been separated, but the coin also survived, yes. that wasn't focused on P technically either, so there are things that survived, as well as the diary, if the diary was burned on his pants, technical, then that would explain his ABS, right? Yes, and it may no longer exist. and along with many of the other artifacts, so maybe that's a simple explanation for where everything went, including the reference to the gold rings. Yes, that would be terrible, maybe it's gone forever. Woodford's diary may be missing, but he also produced a sketch of the battlefield that is very accurate in the roads and terrain, showing all his skill as a former staff officer of the Duke of Wellington would have planned the French and English armies, but where did you find your information about its provisions?
This prompts Tim to check all known references that Woodford might have used a Curry may help clear up some of the confusion surrounding what we know or think we know about Aenor. The oldest map Tim can find showing Aenor. The battlefield is Cassini's map from the 18th century, almost 400 years old. years after the battle, from the beginning there are problems with this, what we must look at are the original sources of the map and the cartographic evidence because of course we have 400 years in which there is no map, in which case if Look at the first map and obviously that is the Cassini map from the mid-18th century.
The only representation of the battle is one of the sword symbols. Cassini's map only refers to the approximate location of the battlefield through its research. Anne couldn't find any diagrams. or plan of the real confrontation until well into the 19th century. I think this is the first printed attempt to plan the battle and this was in Harris Nicholas's history, the Battle of Ain Court, second edition of 1832, it is a bit problematic because it seems to be backwards, it seems to put Ain Court in the right side, the battle is shown west of Ain Court village, so is it wrong?
Well no one else has followed it, no it does well, although there are elements of this on other maps all later maps from the mid 19th century almost to the present day seem to have used this as inspiration before adding their own individual details . These are artistic representations of what people were thinking at the time. very few maps that show it like this, I mean the tradition as it developed in the 19th century, show it in the traditional positions with Ain Court wood towards West Trump Court to the east, if all later maps follow the map of Harris Nichols of 1832, so where did Harris Nichols get his information?
Only one detailed battle map is known to have existed before 1832. Well, this is the oldest map we know of and it is also one of the most accurate and this is the one that Woodford drew in 1818. Woodford. has overlaid his interpretation of the battle on this map and of course what we have now is the standard format of what we would recognize as the Battle of Ainor, we don't know if that influenced, say, Nicholas' diagram exactly 19 32, the only problem. From a minor point of view the study is that all the things that Woodford has marked here are in his own mind and are no more reliable than the chronicle texts exactly.
Woodford probably based his own interpretation on the texts that were available to him in the early 19th century, many of the Chronicles that are now standard references for aeno were not translated until An's work in the 1990s. Raphael Hollins Chronicles I heard were in most gentlemen's libraries, so I think that's where we got our information. It's not until we find the physical evidence of this battle, so with numbers of arrowheads, numbers of artifacts, numbers of whatever, even numbers of bodies and bones in a specific location, we can point to this area and say : "This is part of the battlefield." I know until then to be honest Ain Court only exists in our minds, really reading this and looking at these maps it is still an interpretation and an interpretation only exists in the mind until you find something that ties it together you will never know exactly .
How many French soldiers died? Most of them probably still lay in the fields near here somewhere, the mass of French infantry was a perfect target. Hundreds of thousands of English archers bent their backs and unleashed a storm of arrows on their enemies. Henry V knew very well that the longbow in the hands of trained English archers was the most feared weapon on the battlefields of the Hundred Years' War. He would also have known the effectiveness of the Arrow, a storm of arrows or the use of arrows in a punctuated manner and was wounded in the face by an arrow at the Battle of Shury.
It was unlikely that the English king would have forgotten the painful experience of being taken from him. the arrow for several days. I think I've realized how useful those troops are because they're terribly versatile, we've seen them. at Ain Court in a perfect situation for the storm of arrows but they have many other uses uh too, as I say, they also have a use in close quarters with their last arrows loose the English archers would have joined the men-at-arms in the pel Mell final assault on the French bed in France Tim now goes in search of some of them there is one last place he wants to look Tim knows that Woodford found some of the dead Aenor, but exactly how many is unknown until perhaps one day they will be rediscovered the excavation diary However, what happened to the bones that Woodford found in the years after the excavation?
There were French claims that Woodford planned to use them to celebrate an English triumph at Aenor. Tim's research has shown that this was not the case. What we need to do is find this date inscribed on the wall of the church, it is 1838, this marks the location, according to a certain document, of where the human remains were buried in the cemetery that Woodford excavated from the mass graves, it is potentially the end from a long line of research. We've been tracking Woodford, we've been tracking his digs, we've been trying to figure out where his digs took place, and of course these are the human remains that were found in the tomb and then transported from the battlefield.
Going down the town towards the cemetery. I have never looked for this date and I have never looked at the terrain. We will go to the chapel and see if we can find this date somewhere on the church wall. John George Woodford, who in his 90s was the last British officer to serve at Watero to die, perhaps knew something of what it meant to have experienced the most terrible battle of an era when he sought to recover bones with simple dignity. Tim Southernland is the only other archaeologist to have searched for the tombs of Aenor, so almost 200 years later it is fitting that he is here now to search for the final piece of the puzzle.
It's closely associated with the window, so it should be pretty easy to find, but it's not there. It's not in that one, I guess it was some people who were marking the walls to do some kind of reconnaissance to be able to recognize the place again and here there is a blockade and there is 18 38, that is the place according to the story. that is the place where the human remains were buried and it is not a large area, so it is also part of the road that passes through this window, so presumably it is a small amount of human remains, it is not a huge coffin, so it is interesting and maybe They're still there, I guess they're still there, so after all that weight in the grave until 1818, then they come out of the grave, pick it up and finally head to the consecrated ground in this cemetery in the village of Vajin Co and I never made it to the Memorial Chapel specially built for the battle.
It's quite sad in a way, but at least we found her. That is important.

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