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Strategies to become more emotional intelligent | Daniel Goleman | WOBI

Jun 08, 2021
What I would like to do is share with you how

emotional

intelligence can help us

become

better betas and why it is this particular skill set that will help us along the way and gain

emotional

intelligence. I'm just talking about how we handle ourselves, how we manage ourselves, how we guide ourselves and how we manage our relationships and I'll go into that in

more

detail. It's interesting that I spent yesterday morning with one of the big four banks here in Australia, the CEO, his direct reports and his high potential, the people they considered the next generation for senior leadership.
strategies to become more emotional intelligent daniel goleman wobi
There and they wanted to learn about emotional intelligence and leadership, the reason was that not only is each of those executives trying to improve in this regard, but they also see that by doing it together, they can move the entire organization forward and by doing so, they can grow their business, it's actually a strategic decision, there are two types of strategy, you know, one is exploitation and the other is exploration, exploitation was embodied by the co-CEOs of Blackberry. For a long time they were first in the smartphone space and in that space they captured the market until something else started happening.
strategies to become more emotional intelligent daniel goleman wobi

More Interesting Facts About,

strategies to become more emotional intelligent daniel goleman wobi...

Smartphones were developed by Apple by Samsung and they didn't see it coming, they just kept developing their keyboard, in fact, in 2007. there was a small message in what was then the largest news magazine in the United States, Time magazine, it said: you know, there's a new word in the English language, the word is Bissell, it means bewildered and angry and that's how you feel when someone takes out their blackberry and starts talking to someone else things have changed the standards of care have changed now we don't feel frustrated but you can also say it was ten years ago because they said blackberry instead of iPhone, so the other strategic focus is exploration, that's what Steve Jobs was brilliant at looking for the next big thing, innovating and being able to be there before your competitors, so emotional intelligence may seem counterintuitive, but I'm going to argue that it's what makes us better betas.
strategies to become more emotional intelligent daniel goleman wobi
I began to realize the importance of emotional intelligence. Years ago when I went to college I grew up in a farm town in the Central Valley of California and actually the outskirts of Perth reminded me of where I grew up but this town didn't distinguish itself anyway but I managed to get into college

more

competitive. In America, because they wanted to diversify, they wanted a kid who was from a public school instead of an elite prep school and somewhere else in those days that was considered diversification, so I found myself at this fancy college and I met a boy who had perfect scores.
strategies to become more emotional intelligent daniel goleman wobi
In every college entrance exam, this guy had a brilliantly high IQ, but he had a problem, the problem was that he couldn't get up on time in the morning, he never came to class, he never finished his papers. It took him eight years to get his bachelor's degree, so he was brilliant on the IQ side, he lacked how he handled himself a few years later. I went to my 20th high school reunion and there I met someone who was the most successful person in our class at the time and I knew him pretty well. In high school he was someone who wasn't really a good student, he was pretty much an average student, very average, but he was a fantastic human being, he was the kind of person that you enjoyed doing things with and who really listened, he was very gentle. but you, to your liking, had fun with him 20 years later, he was the senior vice president of a company that was then the most popular company, the most popular sector was cable television and then at the 40th meeting I got the rest of the story.
The guy had left that company, started his own company and became CEO, sold it at the top of the market and did something that, from the point of view of all the people who lived in my hometown, was a sign of success and he lived on a golf course in Florida, so he had a lot of emotional intelligence, not a lot of IQ, and that makes sense to me. I recently met the CEO of Blackrock. Blackrock is the largest investment firm in the world, managing trillions of dollars and he was baffled and said can you explain why I hire the best and brightest from the best schools or companies and still have a bell curve for performance, what's going on here and I'd like to share with you the answer I gave, it has to be With some research I did after writing Emotional Intelligence, I became very interested in business and remembered that my mentor in graduate school had written a article in the Maine psychology journal, that was my field, which was very controversial at the time, said if you want to hire someone, don't look at their IQ, don't look at their personality tests, don't really look at their business experience, you know.
What you want to do is look in your own company at the people who hold that position now or have held it. in the past identify by whatever metric that makes sense for that position the top 10% of stars and compare the stars to people in the same position who are average performers do a systematic analysis and identify the skills or competencies you see in the stars that are not seen in the average are called competency models, anyone who is familiar with the competency model, most world-class companies have competency models, particularly for high-level executives, and I could have access to between a hundred and two hundred of these, which wasn't easy because these are proprietary studies, companies don't share the data they want to know, they're doing it for competitive reasons, but this is what I found: a grenade in the data and I just looked at this , it's very much the other way around, how many of those skills have companies themselves independently identified as distinctive of their stars how many of those skills are based on cognitive strengths IQ and technical skills or emotional intelligence how we handle ourselves and our relationships and what I found was for jobs of all types emotional intelligence is about twice as important and it's twice as important to distinguish that that blue line at the bottom is what you learned in school in your technical skills is what all Others have those are threshold competencies what you need to get the job but they don't tell you how you will do once you are on the job.
Will you be a star performer? He would be a great team member. Will he

become

a leader? The higher you go in the organization, the more emotional intelligence matters, so for a high-level position c-suite jobs, for example, 80 to 90% of the competencies that companies themselves identify as distinctive stars here are based on emotional intelligence. It makes sense because what you are doing at that moment is not using your technical skills or whatever you have learned to do. that position in terms of cognitive skills, what you're primarily doing is managing people, the art of leadership is getting work done well through other people, so there was only one study done on engineers and what distinguished the best engineers from The average engineers results in success as judged by their peers, people who know the job and the person well, has zero correlation with IQ and enormously with emotional intelligence.
Why would that be? It's because there is a floor effect to being an engineer, having an MBA, being a professional of any kind. you need an IQ about one standard deviation above the norm above one hundred it should be 115 or better the effect is that once you are in that role everyone else is as smart as you so the IQ disappears As a predictor of success, emotional intelligence remains a skill here in high-level jobs that relies on cognitive skills. It is very revealing of your big-picture thinking, pattern recognition, understanding how a change here in a complex system is going to branch out there or how a decision made today will be important in five years or ten years this allows you to identify your strategy, but once you have your strategy, you can only get there through your people, you have to do what you have to communicate, persuade, listen, dialogue, inspire, motivate and all of those are emotional intelligence skills.

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