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Strategies for Encouraging Your Child's Speech and Language Development

Jun 09, 2021
Hello and welcome, my name is Tracy Kaplan. I am a certified

speech

-

language

pathologist and clinical assistant in the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Arizona. This parent training module will focus on

strategies

to encourage

your

child

's

speech

and

language

development

. At home, in this session, you can expect to learn several tips to support and improve

your

child

's speech and language skills in your own home and during everyday activities. This module will cover the following topics. First, I will briefly discuss why speaking is important and the importance. to have conversations with our children, below I will outline five specific

strategies

to support your child's speech and language skills.
strategies for encouraging your child s speech and language development
Lastly, I will share several ideas for at-home activities that also support a child's speech and language

development

. Talking to our children is very important. Children really need conversations to learn, in fact, they long to talk with others, especially adults, life offers many opportunities to have rich conversations with your child, whether you are at home making dinner, playing in the backyard or In the car driving to school, there are always many opportunities for you to enrich and develop your child's language and life through conversation. Just because children don't understand everything we share with them doesn't mean they can't benefit from these interactions, so the moral of the story is talk to your kids every day and talk a lot because it really matters.
strategies for encouraging your child s speech and language development

More Interesting Facts About,

strategies for encouraging your child s speech and language development...

There are many strategies that parents and caregivers can use to improve the development of a child's speech and language skills and in this module we will focus on five specific strategies that anyone can use in everyday activities. There are no special tools, toys, equipment or educational certification required to use them, all you need is your voice and of course your child's. The five speech and language strategies we will discuss today are self-talk, parallel dialogue, also known as conveyed conversation, wait-and-see modeling, expansion, and reframing. The first strategy we will talk about is called self-talk. Self-talk is a continuous dialogue about your actions think of yourself as a cook on Food Channel talking about everything you're doing, like mixing and serving Cooking, tasting, for example, while making lunch with your child, you might say: I'm going to get the bread now.
strategies for encouraging your child s speech and language development
I'm spreading peanut butter on top of the bread. It's sticky. Where is the gelatin? Oh, it was hiding behind the loaf of bread. I'm cutting the sandwich now yum yum I can't wait to eat the sandwich with you Essentially, this strategy is about talking about what you, the parent or caregiver, are doing when you are around your child, you will match your words with your actions. - which will help you develop your child's language. The strategy can be used in every environment you can imagine, such as the supermarket, the movie theater, the park in the car, and of course, at home.
strategies for encouraging your child s speech and language development
It may seem a little strange to use your own language at first. talk, but with practice it will be easy and fun for you and your child. The next strategy we'll talk about is called parallel talk or streamed talk. This strategy is very similar to self-talk, but this time you will be giving a running commentary on what your child is talking to yourself. You are talking about yourself and side talk this time you are talking about your child. Consider yourself the sportscaster describing each action. What is your child doing, for example, if your child is playing with toy cars while playing you could say Oh Johnnie is playing with his cars you are pushing the car push push push the red car oh he crashed into the truck oops again!
The idea is to start a conversation about what your child is doing no matter where he is or what is happening. Self-talk and parallel dialogue go very well together, you may even find yourself using both strategies within the same conversation. That's great, the more strategies you can include in your daily interactions with your child, the better. Try talking about what everyone is doing using both strategies. The next strategy is called wait and see. This strategy is probably the simplest to understand but the most difficult to apply on a daily basis. The idea behind the wait and see strategy. is to do precisely that wait and see wait and see what your child will say many times adults ask children question after question and do not wait and give them enough time to answer for themselves, children have a lot to say, but if you do not We give them the opportunity to speak, we limit their possibilities to practice and grow in their language development.
The wait-and-see strategy encourages adults to be patient when waiting for a child to answer their question. a good rule of thumb for this. The strategy is to try to wait 5-10 seconds after asking a child a question which may not seem very long, but boy, sometimes it can seem like an eternity, just keep trying and remember each time to wait and give them time. your son to think about what. They mean that she is letting her son know that she cares about what he has to say and that she is also promoting better conversation. Here is an example if you ask your child what happened while playing with race cars using the wait button and...
See strategy would mean that after asking this question you would pause for 5 to 10 seconds before returning to the conversation, so with this strategy just remember to wait, wait, wait, modeling is a strategy that many parents and caregivers are already doing, but just don't do it. Know that you have a name. Children learn well through imitation and modeling. It is about imitation and demonstration. Think of this as another way to teach your child. The key idea is to say or show what you want your child to do sooner than expected. To do this, for example, imagine that you take your child to school, you enter the classroom, you see the teacher and you say, in front of your child, good morning, Mrs.
Smith then looks expectantly at her son and says Susie, what do you say to the lady? Smith, her son responds by saying good morning, ma'am. Smith, this is a classic example of modeling. You are showing your child what to say, how to say it, and even when to say it. We can use this strategy in several ways. You can model what a certain word sounds like your child is having. have trouble saying or can model what to say when your child asks for an item. The bottom line is to show and say what you want your child to do and say.
The final strategy we will learn is actually an expansion and reformulation of two and one. Although these are two slightly different strategies, they go very well together and are often used as a team. Let's start with the expansion. This strategy is about

encouraging

your child to say more by expanding on what she has already said. This is a great way to help. your child starts combining words, for example if your child says dog you can expand this by saying yes I see a dog, if your child then says dog eight you can expand again and say you are right the dog is eating again the idea The main behind the strategy is to expand on what your child has said, make it longer, this is a great way to help them say more and simultaneously develop language, so what about rephrasing?
Rephrasing is a strategy used to gently correct our children's speech and language. Children do well when it is provided for them. with feedback on how to correctly say a certain sound, word or even phrase, but it is important to provide this feedback and subtle, non-threatening rephrasing is perfect for this. With this strategy, you are providing a correct example of speech and language for your child. in a gentle way that encourages them to continue communicating and learning, for example, if your child says I want to read using recasting, you could say Oh, you want to read, I want to read with the correct sentence structure and the words have been rephrased or reformulated. to your child so they can hear the correct way and the way this correction was made is very natural and sounds positive what you wouldn't want to say in this situation is no, that's not how you asked me, you have to say I want to read it again the right way: By directly correcting a child, we can inadvertently stop the learning process, stop the conversation, or even take the fun out of communication, so remember to correct your child's speech and language gently, such as You can see when he does it. rephrasing, you are expanding without realizing it, that is why the two strategies go hand in hand now that we have learned our five strategies, let's talk about different activities that you can incorporate them into throughout each day, remember that practice really does make perfection, so the more you practice using all of these strategies, the more comfortable and effective you will feel.
There are many wonderful activities that promote conversation with your child that can be done in and around the home. The opportunities are truly endless. Here are some fun ideas for Books to get you started are great ways to engage your child in an enriched toddler language experience. Books with many colorful images. Fewer words and repetitive words or phrases can be a great place to start. Books with longer words and stories are great to use. Also, especially with older children, remember that it is not necessary to read every word on every page. Sometimes, especially with young children, stories become too long and not so enjoyable when we read every word on every page.
Reading books can become much more enjoyable for everyone. when you allow your child to help guide the story, what to read and even how long to look at each page, so don't get too caught up in reading the whole story, just focus on talking about what you see and what happens in the way. Music. Finger plays and nursery rhymes are great tools for

encouraging

speech and language skills at home, just as with books, songs and rhymes that have repetitive words and phrases like twinkle twinkle little star are great and Generally easier for children to learn, they offer many opportunities for children to learn specific sounds and words because they hear them over and over again.
Also, the wonderful thing about music is that it is portable, you can take it anywhere because all you need is your voice and songs from home in the car, at the store or at the zoo can travel anywhere, which makes them comfortable to use and, of course, fun. There are a variety of games and puzzles available for children of all ages. Any game or puzzle can work well to encourage your child's speech and language skills. There is no specific game or toy. that works best don't wake dad candyland or even a farm animal puzzle all games and puzzles can be effective if adults use communication strategies like the ones we've talked about here while using them so pick a game from your home and a session strategy. and start facilitating excellent speech and language at home.
Cooking activities are great for supporting a child's speech and language development. For example, if your child has a hard time making the book sound like it's a bumblebee, one day she could bake a batch of brownies at home while she bakes them. You can use lots of words that start with the buh sound to help your child get a lot of practice listening and even trying to say the specific sound you might say to your child. Let's take the brownies out of the box. Let's stir the brownie batter in the bowl. It's time to bake the brownies in the oven or boy, these brownies are big.
By linking this cooking task with your child's speech and language, you have created a fun, motivating, and effective communication activity. Take an observation walk with your child. Observation walks are another exciting and beneficial activity. activity to facilitate your child's speech and language skills and gets everyone moving; All you need is yourself, your child, and a safe place to walk and observe while you walk with your child, simply talk about what you both see and do during your walk. You might say things like look, I see a red bird or I'm walking on rocks. Make sure you use the strategies we've talked about here and this type of activity is sure to be a success.
Lastly, iSpy is a classic game that requires limitations. provides just you and your child and a safe place to spy while looking around a room or a certain place, such as the park, a store, or the zoo, take turns talking about what you and your child see using the phrase I spy, I see, if your child sees a beetle on the ground they might say I see, I see a bug, if you see a dog barking outside, you might say I see, I see a dog barking, whatever you and your child see, just make sure you talk about it and have a good time communicating. maybeYou might even want to play iSpy on your observation walk.
Thank you very much for your interest and for learning more about how to support your child's speech and language development. Remember that the strategies presented here are just a few of the many great strategies available for you to use if you would like more help or guidance or have questions about the information covered in this session and would like to speak with a speech therapist about your child and their development. of speech and language, feel free to contact the Speaking Matters hotline and don't. Forget about talking, so have fun communicating with your children.

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