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Stableford Scoring

Stableford Scoring
hi this is Tracy Tresidder from golf mind play welcome to an introduction to

Stableford

scoring

over the next 10 to 15 minutes you'll learn some tips and some rules about how to score

Stableford

Stanford

scoring

was originally developed by dr. Frank

Stableford

of the Liverpool Club in England in 1931 and he designed the game to speed up play and rather than counting every stroke that you hit as you would do in stroke play

Stableford

allows you to score points based on your handicap in the
stableford scoring
game of

Stableford

we refer to par in this example it is in relation to your handicap

scoring

is calculated as follows power is two points one over par is one point two over par is zero points one under par is three points and two under par is four points if you have played to your handicap you will have 36 points now there are some definitions that you need to understand that are commonly used when playing

Stableford

they are par index and handicap park and mean two things it can mean the par
for the hole that is the number of strokes in which the hole should be played based on its length and this is actually written on the card for each hole and the other meaning for par is the par for the course and then in this instance it is the number of strokes in which the entire course should be played if you were a scratch golfer that is playing off zero so your handicap would be zero it is the addition of the individual hole pars and for the card that you're looking at we have the
men's in the blue and the ladies in the red the men's par par for the course is 72 if you look right to the very bottom that is 36 on the front and 36 on the back giving them a total power of 72 and for the ladies we're looking over at the right hand side at the red column they have 37 strokes allowed for the front plane to power and 37 for the back which gives a total of 74 index rates the degree of difficulty on each hole and index one is generally speaking the most difficult index
18 is usually the easiest and the index allows the golfer to allocate their handicap points over the holes on the course indexes are determined by taking a number of cards played in competition over the season and averaging them out for each of the 18 holes on the course here we have the sample card again and I've highlighted the easiest and the hardest holes on the course for both the men and the women the hardest hole is index 1 and for ladies that is the fourth hole and for men it is the
14th hole the easiest hole on the course is index 18 and for men that is hole number 8 and for ladies that is the 16th handicap refers to a numerical representation of the golfers playing ability so the lower a golfers handicap the better the golfer is a 2 handicapper is better than a 10 handicapper who is better than a 20 handicapper it is basically the number of strokes above the part of the course that you would average your initial handicap will be determined by playing three stroke rounds
with a player who has a registered handicap the three cards will be returned to the clubhouse and averages will be created and your handicap will be determined from those three cards handicap is adjusted almost every time you play in a competition and depending on your score for the round it can go up down or remain the same it can move as little as 0.1 it enables players of all standards to compete against each other so a golfer with a handicap of ten can play in the same competition as a
stableford scoring
golfer with the handicap of twenty five or forty five it doesn't really matter because your handicap is taken into account we need to allocate handicaps to indexes so that you can actually work out how you play the game according to your handicap and how you score the index for each hole allows you to allocate your handicap over the individual holes in reference to an 18-hole competition 45 handicap is allocated to extra strokes per hole plus an additional stroke on the nine harness holes
indexed one to nine that is three additional strokes on index 1 to 9 and 2 additional strokes on index 10 to 18 a 36 handicapper is allocated to extra strokes on all 18 holes an 18 handicapper is allocated one extra stroke on all 18 holes a nine handicap is allocated one extra stroke on only the holes indexed one to nine and on the remaining holes he or she does not get any strokes at all here's a question just to see if you're getting the concept of index and handicaps if you had a
handicap of 27 how would it be allocated on an 18 hole course you would get one stroke on every hole and two strokes on holes indexed 1 to 9 if you had a handicap of 38 how would that be allocated over the 18 hole course and the answer is 2 extra strokes on all 18 holes and three strokes on holes indexed 1 & 2 they are the hardest holes if you break a handicap your first loose strokes on the easiest holes and they would be the holes indexed 18 that would be the first one that you lose
followed by index 17 and so on so how do I actually score for

Stableford

so what we have to do here is take into account the index for each hole and you make a mental note of your par for the hole based on your handicap and this example is based on the lady's index and we're going to use an example of a person who's on a 45 handicap so if your handicap is 45 and you are on the second hole according to this card that we are using the power is 5 and the index is 15 so you're
allocated 2 extra strokes therefore your par for the hole is actually 7 so if you have 7 strokes you will score 2 points if you have exceeded your own power by two strokes based on your handicap you cannot score any points for that hole and you must pick up so here's a sample of a completed scorecard there are some things that you must actually have on the card when you return it to the Pro Shop the clubhouse or the committee for competition purposes in this instance Jane Doe is the player
she's on a handicap of 45 and Tracy T is the marker on a handicap of 9 this is jane doe's card and you'll see that we've we've got her name on there and under the next to the word player we I put the initials JD and next to the marker I put TT so Jane Doe is the player TT is the marker there are certain things that must go on the card you must have the player's name and handicap the date and the type of competition now quite often these things will actually be
stableford scoring
automatically printed by the pro shop when you go in and pay your comp fee if these things are not on the card you must make sure you write them in otherwise you could be disqualified from the competition as you go through the round from old hole you actually put the stroke score in for the hole if you exceed the number of strokes allowable for your handicap in

Stableford

you must pick up the ball and no score is entered you just put in a little line like a minus sign now on the card that
we're looking at here Jane Doe on the ninth hole didn't score so she's picked up on that hole so she's had a little line put in there or looks like a minus but just a line to indicate that she has not scored and we've added up her

Stableford

scores in the front nine and she's actually scored 13 stub or four points on the front nine the player in the marker must both sign the card at the completion of the round one of the common errors for beginner golfers is that they
actually sign the car the beginning just to so they don't forget to sign it at the end the problem with that is that it's actually illegal to do that it's against the rules of golf you must not sign the card before the round is complete because you are actually attesting to the accuracy and the completeness of the card by signing it you can so therefore you cannot sign a card that doesn't have any scores on it if you forget to sign the card you will be disqualified from the
competition so here are some examples if you're on the fourth hole it's a par-5 the lady's index is one this is the hardest hole you are allocated three extra strokes because you're playing off forty-five so your par for this hole is eight if you take seven strokes to get in the hole that is one under your par so you will actually score three points and how we say it is this you can say seven or three or seventy-three so it's seven strokes three stover four points so seven or
three or seventy-three depends on how the people you play would like to call it if you're on the 16th hole it's a par three the lady's index is 18 this is the easiest hole you are allocated to extra strokes and therefore your par is five if you take six strokes to get into the hole you'll score one point so six it's best to call out your score as you pick the ball out of the hole just call out your stroke score don't worry if you can't remember how to score the

Stableford

points not a problem the key thing is to have the strokes actually written down on the card we can work out the state for points later so there are a number of advantages of

Stableford

it actually speeds up play since once you cannot score you must pick the ball up you cannot continue you cannot putt out as we say if you have a couple of bad holes you might be able to make up extra points on other holes and players of all ability can play in the same competition together when you
begin your

Stableford

round mentally work out your par for the hole that you're playing so on the first hole work out what is your par this is essential to keep the game moving you need to know at what point you must pick up the ball as you cannot score once you can't score pick it up and then attend the flag for those who are still able to score marking the card as you leave the green tell your marker your stroke and

Stableford

score complete the scorecard at the next tee don't hang
around the green to complete your scorecard because quite often that holds up play for the people approaching that green that you've just finished on so move to the next tee and complete the scorecard there the person with the best

Stableford

score has the honor and they must tell off while the others are marking their card once they have hit off they'll step off the tee mark their card while the rest of the group is actually teeing off ensure you write the actual strokes and the

Stableford

score on the allocated hole now if you can't work out the stable for the score at that point don't panic too much it's just the actual strokes that are most important many clubs these days have computers that allocate the stoever for the score so if you do have problems that it will sort it out but usually amongst the four of you you can work out what's what the

Stableford

score is the most important thing is to have the number of strokes recorded check with your
marker at the end and sign the card make sure you haven't signed it early that's illegal sign the card at the end go through all these strokes compare scores and then you sign your card you sign your fellow competitors card so that there's two signatures on each card and then that is returned to the club for competition purposes if you'd like some more information on other aspects of golf particularly the mind play of golf contact me at Tracy at golf mind play comm or you can go
to my website golf mind play calm and download a free tip sheet to help you with all the mental aspects of your game or you can sign up to our monthly newsletter and get some ongoing tips or you can do an our Facebook page or you can visit the golf mind play youtube channel to see Tracy's two-minute mind tips wherever you are in the world here's to great golfing I hope you've enjoyed this introduction to stoic

scoring

go out there and play great golf and I'll be with you soon