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Sperm Whales of Dominica; Monkey Island; Sloths | 60 Minutes Full Episodes

Apr 08, 2024
tonight in this special edition of 60 Minutes presents animal magnetism what it's like to be in the water with them magical 60 Minutes is face to face with the whale from Moby Dick The legend but Melville's novel was fiction

sperm

whales

are especially maternal The generations They live together while they take care of their babies and they have the largest grain in the animal kingdom and they sleep like this. There are approximately 1,800

monkey

s in Kyo Santiago. They live isolated in what is a natural laboratory. Today, scientists are studying how the stress of a devastating hurricane affected to their general health and relationships and what that could teach us about ourselves since we share 94% of our DNA with them, so the two toads I always say look like a cross between a wook and a pig because they have that type adorable nose and then these have the kind of haircuts you already know from the Beatles and MOA Lisa smiles behind that doorbell for Ringo Cook says it's a secret to be Nature's couch potato is the reason why Sloths have survived for over 60 million years despite being well themselves.
sperm whales of dominica monkey island sloths 60 minutes full episodes
Good night. I'm Cecilia Vega, welcome to 60 Minutes, tonight I present three stories of animal magnetism that attract us. Leslie Stall pays a visit to Monkey Island off the coast of Puerto Rico, where the inhabitants roam free and have much to teach the scientists who study them. Sharon just moves. so slowly among the treetops of Central America with the

sloths

but we start in the depths of the Caribbean Sea in 2022 almost all member countries of the United Nations committed to protect at least 30% of the world's land and sea by 2030 to reverse the damage caused. by humans and protect vulnerable species, one of the animals at risk is also one of the largest in the ocean and among the least understood,

sperm

whales

are not the predators of Moby Dick Legend, they have a mark six times larger than ours and spend most of their lives.
sperm whales of dominica monkey island sloths 60 minutes full episodes

More Interesting Facts About,

sperm whales of dominica monkey island sloths 60 minutes full episodes...

In the darkest depths of the ocean it is difficult to describe their size without comparing them to a school bus. Last spring we traveled with National Geographic explorer Enrique Salah to the Caribbean

island

of Dominica where he proposed protections for the hundreds of sperm whales that live there. guys ready go go go go guys go look in the water coming right at you yeah most enri salah dives don't start out like a fire drill even though it's been thousands of hours underwater like an explorer. You look this way, this way we come face to face with a pot of whales, but these are not the whales we traveled here to see, they are pygmy killer whales known to threaten sperm whales and, because they are here, the sperm whales do not are these.
sperm whales of dominica monkey island sloths 60 minutes full episodes
Orcas can grow up to 8 and a half feet in size. Salah told us that seeing them up close almost never happens. You've never been able to get into the water with one of these. They are that elusive. They are very elusive. Because? That's why you don't see them, they are very intelligent, they hunt like wolves, they hunt in groups and they don't mind interacting with humans, they go after the prey, we were off the coast of Dominica, a country in the Eastern Caribbean, the residents call it Nature Island, those peaks. Rainforest-covered volcanics drop thousands of feet to the sea floor, which is why hundreds of sperm whales live in these waters.
sperm whales of dominica monkey island sloths 60 minutes full episodes
They are one of the deepest diving mammals on the planet. They are mostly female. Here families made up of grandmothers, mothers and daughters who stay together for life nursing and raising their young when Enrique Salah was here his National Geographic team filmed this is a pod of giant vertical sleeping female sperm whales up to 40 feet long suspended nearby From the surface their nap lasts only about 15

minutes

until the whales are ready to dive again and what can be an hour-long trip for the squid thousands of feet deep even for researchers why they sleep like this is one of the big ones.
Mysteries that we have in our minds what it is like to be in the water with them magical the legend of mobidik these unpleasant and aggressive animals but you jump into the water and they are so docile and gentle that they have never attacked humans and they are very curious, especially the babies, making it one of the most incredible wildlife encounters one can have on the planet. your official title is explorer in residence it's not bad it's an oxymoron explorers aren't supposed to be true you're not supposed to be sitting in one place what does that mean to be an explorer in the year 2023 very different from what an explorer in the year is 19th century I am able to dedicate my life and work with an incredible team of scientists, policy experts, filmmakers, storytellers to work with local communities, governments, indigenous people to assess the health of ocean places and help protect them.
He grew up north of Barcelona, ​​Spain, near the coast. Their first dive was in a marine reserve, it drove everything they have done since, if we give the ocean space it can heal itself. Sala moved to California, California, where he was a professor of marine ecology for seven years at the Scrips Institution of Oceanography. I had a long academic career at one of the best universities and you tried and decided that it wasn't because of me that you walked away. I walked away because my job was to study the impacts of humans on the ocean, the impacts of fishing and global warming and one day it hit me. that all I was doing was writing the ocean's obituary writing the ocean's obituary yes, it felt like Doctor Who was telling you that you're going to die with an unbearable detto but without offering a cure, have you found that cure?
There is a solution. That is proven to be a success story around the world, which are marine reserves or marine protected areas, areas where harmful activities are prohibited and marine life can return. He founded the Pristine Seas project in 2008, combining marine exploration scientific research and public policy and has worked. With 17 countries to convert these large swaths of ocean into marine protected areas in Dominica, scientists estimate that the sperm whale population is declining by 3% each year. Sola says a reserve would protect them from their biggest threats - not the pygmy orcas we saw or the whaling that has been banned for decades, but plastic trash, ocean noise pollution and ship strikes, if they continue.
With the status quo here, what happens if nothing is done? The population will likely continue to decline, so hope

full

y reducing those threats will allow the sperm population to recover and more Wells, are the biggest benefits Dominica and local communities will get Hurricane Maria devastated those communities in 2017 today the

island

continues to rebuild and prepare for the future climate Francine Baron heads the agency in charge of that effort what was it about Hurricane Maria that made the leaders of this country say that we had to do something, that we really had to act, we suffered the equivalent to a loss of 226 of GDP to be able to see the trend and we realized that we needed to be much more resilient when Enrique Salah came to you with this idea of ​​creating a sanctuary for these whales, what was your proposal?
We see whale watching as an important part of our tourism product and it is something that needs to be protected and the idea of ​​creating greater protection for whales is something that Dominica is very open to and we were very pleased with the suggestion that Enrik made to create a recognized sanctuary for Wales. Enrik Salah compares it to a model that has worked in Rwanda, where protecting mountain gorillas helped attract tourism dollars to the local economy. We're going to find some whales, sure, okay. Captain Kurt Benois was born and raised in Dominica and has been in the whale tourism business for over two decades.
We set out on his 38-tonne lady from a small fishing village on the west coast. Our government. The permit to swim with the whales was valid for 6 days. Captain Ben Wa uses a homemade device that captures the distinctive clicking sound of sperm whales up to 11 M away. We caught whales in the south every 3 miles and checked to see if we were getting them. closer, it's gotten to dad, who's here, tell me about this really high tech device that you have here, you have an underwater microphone that picks up 360 sound, so what I did was I took a salad bowl with nprint so that the hydrophone something hidden so that it goes off, it actually takes you directly to wherever you hear the sound, so this is a salad bow from your house.
Yes, what do whales sound like? It's like a horse galloping on a hot surface, so if you have several, that means. There are a lot of whales there, let's move on, man. I'm going to find these guys okay, the second day, a waterspout, look, it's here, look, guys, you see it, you can see it's superior, look at it, oh my God, there are no swimmers. Here in the water the males live with their families until adolescence and then wander alone swimming thousands of kilometers away. Male Caribbean sperm whales have been found as far away as Norway returning here only to mate.
Our cameraman was lucky or unlucky to have the whale poop on him, so the whales come down, hunt for squid, come back to the surface, breathe, rest and poop, and that poop is

full

of nutrients that fertilize the waters little. deep, so it's a good thing, I guess it's a good thing, come on. people, we are looking for sperm whales, but our luck didn't last, well guys, it's okay, we spent the next day looking for sperm whales and the next nothing, nothing at all, and the next, not a single click, you guys are pretty calm and then , in the last hour of the last day of our trip, yes, there are a lot of animals in the area, guys, they are going to come back, but I'm listening to songs in 360, that means the wheels that we are on top of them, we are there, yeah, Yes Yes. go, go and St, it's coming towards you CIA, it's coming towards you, it's coming towards you jumped into the water and a young girl swam directly towards us, at first she came within a few meters, her size was terrifying, she made a sound like the screeching of the hinge of a door, it's one of the ways whales communicate and socialize with the eyes on the side of its head it stared at us it had squid in its mouth left over from lunch thousands of feet below it stayed and turned and had jaw wide open was using echo location bouncing those clicks of us trying to figure out what we were you could hear the click you could hear it once you got really close to it you could hear that so L could feel it in my bones mhm, you grabbed my hand, you could tell it was. nervous, I was excited too, you are huge, you have to respect them, you have to respect them, there is a feeling of awe that comes from being there, she was looking directly at us and left us a piece of memory of squid, live sperm whales.
Shane Giro is another National Geographic explorer, he started the Dominica sperm whale project and in the last 18 years he has identified more than 35 families. Did you recognize the whale we saw? The animal you met belongs to the ec2 clan. The other clan of whales that we know exists in the Caribbean but we haven't seen much and those groups are identified by making specific clicking patterns called kodas, it's part of who they are, where their grandmother grew up and so it really unites the animals and the place together, how does the Koda of the ec2 sound? They make the Koda 5 R3 and it sounds like this five slow clicks and she came up to you and made this Koda 5 R3 saying: I'm from the ec2 clan, is that you?
She was rolling. and she kept coming back, but am I the one who assigns human characteristics to a whale or is she actually a playful animal? These are the animals that have the largest brains that have ever existed, maybe in the universe, and they use it for complicated thoughts and, uh, behavior. Absolutely, this was an animal that was playful and the curiosity of the animal actively coming towards you just shows that it is an animal that is investigating something in its world and most people don't know that on the dock there is a treasure here and R Sal says it's that world he's trying to protect being in the water with sperm Wells it's a magical experience there's something spiritual there this is more than science and data feeling of wonder and awe that's inevitable when you're in the water with these gentle ones Giants in November the Prime Minister of Dominica announced that the island nation will create the first sperm whale reserve in the world, the sanctuary will be 300 square miles and will have a new senior officer assigned to ensure the safety of the whales.
Cecilia Vega describes what it was like to swim with sperm. whales, she's swimming right toward us on 60

minutes

extra.com With extreme weather events on the rise around the world, like the rare Category 5 hurricane that hit Mexico in October, we were interested in a study being conducted out on a remote island, very few people. They are allowed to visit places where scientists are studying how the stress of these environmental crises affects longevity and overall health, as Leslie Stall first reported in November. The subjects are not what you would expect: they are

monkey

s, reesus macaque monkeys that have beenstudied there. for more than 80 years because 94% of their DNA is the same as that of humans, they survived with relative environmental stability until 6 years ago, when the island was hit by a devastating storm after being tested for tuberculosis, measles and covid.
Leslie and her team were allowed to visit the island called Kyo Santiago or Monkey Island off the coast of Puerto Rico. There are approximately 1,800 monkeys on Kyo, they live in isolation and what is a natural laboratory halfway between captivity and way they would live in the wild, yeah, they're fighting, yeah, yeah, she. looking around and shouting for help trying to get others to come to her Help Wow biologist James Hyim of New York University and Noah Snider Mackler of Arizona State University are part of a team of researchers in this research project a long term What is the life expectancy?
It's generally the life expectancy here. On the island, for females, the average life expectancy is about 18 years and then for males, about 15 years. meals every morning researchers tell us that there is a hierarchy in which the highest-ranking monkeys eat first. I have even seen high ranking individuals approach a low ranking individual who is eating food in their mouth and keep their mouth open and take the food out of their mouth. and ankles what did they get Purina Chow monkey there is a Chow monkey made by Karina oh my goodness Rees' monkeys are commonly used for medical research because there are close relatives genetically and physiologically similar to humans they have systems that are quite similar to us eyes that are like us, the lungs and the hearts, which are like us, these reesus macac monkeys, their ancestors came here from India in 1938, the ma is used in greater numbers for medical and zoological research than any other type of primate.
The American primatologist Clarence Carpenter took 500 of them in a grueling process of 14,000. On a sea voyage that lasted 51 days, he wanted to create a naturalistic research center to study the social and sexual behaviors of monkeys. His first years here were difficult, many died from disease, but many of them lived, so in the 1950s scientists began tattooing and taking them. A daily census that has continued meticulous record-keeping with today's monkeys, all of which descend from the original group, gives scientists rare access to more than six decades of their biological and behavioral data. One of the things they learned is that they are highly adaptable and acclimatize quickly to On the island they also learn that they can be quite aggressive, especially with food, and during mating season, these monkeys are intelligent.
They sure are pretty, so they're pretty smart. You know they are socially intelligent. How similar to us are they? and how they live, they form really strong social relationships with their best friends and their families. They have best friends, some close friends, some best friends. Rees's monkeys live in female societies. Mothers, daughters, aunts and grandmothers stay together in groups while the males leave when they reach maturity and join other troops to reproduce, few people know better the tensions and alliances of the troops than Research assistants Daniel Phillips and Hosway Negron, who have worked at Kyo for years, arrive every morning by boat at 7:00 a.m. m. and for the next 7 hours they document things like aggression, grooming, guarding, and feeding.
Do you ever get to know people? In other words, you know that monkey versus that one. Yes, yes, we need to recognize them immediately because I need to know who is interacting with whom, how. like grooming or attacking each other and how you can tell the difference what are the characteristics that you see, you can see the differences even in how they walk, how they move, their uniform faces are different, in other words their faces become common in one way for your eyes to be human faces yes, you even recognize families exactly the way your face is familiar you shouldn't you should be this woman's son everything changed for research and monkeys when Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in September 2017 155 The mph winds whipped through homes and office buildings destroying everything in sight including the power grid and communication systems.
Almost 3,000 people died. The team had no way to reach Monkey Island. Angelina Ruiz Lambid, Kyo's then scientific director, was 7 months pregnant at the time. sheltered in her home on the outskirts of San Juan with her husband and two young children you thought all the monkeys were going to die we thought the monkeys were going to die James Hyim and Noah Snider Mackler were unable to receive any news about their colleague or the monkeys, so two days after the storm, the team came up with an idea and you hired a helicopter. We hired a helicopter. They recruited the pilot to fly over Kyo and do a survey and they had a list of questions.
Can you see any monkeys? Is he alive? What is the state of the vegetation? They are the stagnant puddles of water that they could drink. Angelina, who had decided to go up with the pilot, was horrified. These are pictures he took from the helicopter and I see this destruction as over 80 years of work completely flattened this is Kyo before the hurricane with a dense canopy of trees and lush foliage this is after a green oasis turned brown buried in branches dead the island lost 2/3 of its V agitation disconsolate at what she was seeing from the air Angelina She wanted to look closer, but even on the ground she didn't see any monkeys, so I get on the helicopter again and go back up.
I need to look, they're here and that's where I see a social group running from the helicopter and it's like, oh. There are monkeys, they are still Kyo. I think I estimated correctly, that must be around 300,400 out of 1,700 monkeys, yes, but once the staff was able to return and do a full census on the ground, they discovered, to their utter astonishment, that most had survived, they estimated that about 50 had died and you're thinking how could they survive this, how could they survive this, it's still a mystery what the monkeys did to weather the storm, where they took shelter from the wind and what they ate?
So, one of the big questions is without being fed, how do they feed? Yes, although the hurricane dramatically devastated the island, one thing it also did was deposit a large amount of algae and Aly on the island, so that is a possibility. The monkeys ate more of these types of vegetables that they still seem to enjoy after the hurricane. The monkeys had to adapt to a new, much more hostile environment. Their innate adaptability certainly helped, so they would swing up and down to try to stop themselves. fall forward six years after the storm, continued adaptive attempts to replant the trees have been hampered because monkeys, always curious about something new in their environment, uproot them before they have a chance to grow, so now there is very little shade like it used to be almost now they have a lot of space and shade now they are forced to sit in some shady areas so they have been grouped together by the changing distribution of shade so one interesting thing that What we saw is that individuals became more sociable, not just more social.
Research has noted that monkeys are more tolerant of each other, which at first seemed contradictory. I am thinking about humans in a situation where there are fewer resources and I see competition in my mind. I see them saying: get off my property or whatever, but you. We're saying maybe it was the opposite, but there are also famous examples of people coming together. Yeah, so I think it can go both ways. We are capable of great greed, competition, and cruelty, but humans are also capable of great kindness and compassion. and friendship and generosity and that kind of duality also exists in M ​​recist societies and I think anyone that you have spoken to here in Puerto Rico would mention the fact that, you know, the people of Puerto Rico solidified and increased their I support one of them. another before this event.
Beyond observing their social interactions they were also able to track biological changes since they had access to blood tests carried out on the monkeys for 13 years, so what we found is that the individuals who had experienced the hurricane had immunity systems that seemed to have aged two more years, what is that in human years, that's 6 to 8 human years, aged 6 to 8 years, aged six to eight human years, oh my gosh, through the trauma that was on average, that Is it the work we did? What we're trying to do now is what makes some of these individuals more hurricane resistant.
The hypothesis is that it has something to do with friendships. We think that those individuals who may have had stronger bonds, stronger friendships, may have been protected. This really stressful event, the hurricane, opened up all new avenues of their research with questions like what predicts who survives a catastrophe like an earthquake or a hurricane and how quickly they recover, so when you step back and look at your study in terms of climate-related trauma. or any type of trauma, do you expect to find answers about the survival capacity of human beings in these situations, given the great similarity between these primates, these monkeys and us?
We know that a lot of this is because of the work that we're doing and the things that could serve you, you know, being more resilient to this could be translatable to humans and us and could provide us with ways to intervene and help buffer the negative effects of these. traumatic events. The stopwatch has long been the symbol of 60 minutes, but any measurement. It doesn't make sense for the topic of our next story, the slow-moving sloth. You would think that these distant relatives of the armadillo would be the perfect meal for almost anything faster, and yet somehow

sloths

have survived in one form or another for 64 million. years to understand this peculiar animal 60 minutes with a peculiar zoologist Lucy Cook has been documenting the strange lives of sloths for 15 years Cook was Sharon Alon's guide on a trip to Costa Rica where, as we first reported in September, Scientists are making new discoveries. about a creature that has turned survival of the fittest upside down, this is an area where there are a lot of sloths, so we have that on our side, the first thing we learned about sloths is that they are difficult to spot in the wild, we were warned that we had to do it.
We kept our eyes on the ground for venomous snakes as Lucy Cook scanned the treetops. The sloth is a master of disguise. It blends into the canopy and can easily be mistaken for a tuft of leaves. They tend to bend over when it rains to make it even. It's harder to see them, our luck got better on the beach, oh there's one up there, it's in the corner of the tree and it looks a bit like a termite hump and it's hunched over, so what we're looking at is its back, which It's not the side of the sloth.
We went all the way to Central America to see it, so Lucy Cook took us to an animal sanctuary to get a better view of the two species of sloth that live here, the bratus and the tut toad, so both toads I always say look like a cross between a wook and a CU pig, they have that kind of adorable nose and these have the kind of haircuts that you know from beetles and Mona Lisa smiles behind that Ringo Cooks doorbell, he says that it's a secret to be nature's couch potato. the reason sloths have survived for over 60 million years despite being fine, their eyesight is terrible, their hearing isn't much better in a tree, they can move like a Tai Chi master to avoid the eyes of The birds of prey are hungry, but on the ground they cook. says that gravity removes any shred of dignity even with the force of a hurricane Tail wind a sloth will peak at half a mile an hour the first people to describe sloths The conquistadors who first observed them said terrible things one He said that it was the stupidest animal he had ever seen and another said that one more defect would have made his life impossible and they simply did not understand them.
You know, Cook says what those early explorers didn't understand and what, frankly, is hard to believe when you see the effort. All it takes for a sloth to blink is that this furry ninja is specially designed to survive. Why are they so slow? Why are they moving so slow? Because they are saving energy. They are vegetarians and the leaves don't want to be eaten any more than antelopes. right, so they create a lot of toxins so that the sloth can digest those toxins, but only very, very slowly, they don't want to process them quickly, so it's about burning as little energy as possible.
Sloths spend approximately 90% of their lives. hanging upside down and usually only go up to the floor to go to the bathroom once a week with habits like that and nailslike this, you can understand why they are solitary creatures and prefer to be alone until they don't, what they do is the females climb. to the top of a tree when they are in heat and scream for sex, okay, very discreet, very discreet, but they scream high pitched as if it were that way. They do this and I will do it and it is possible that he will do it with the force of my impersonation, let's see if Teddy, who is a boy exactly, let's see if he does well.
I'm going to do it. In fact, I've seen Bruses having sex. It's the only thing they do quickly. I mean, I was surprised, but then both the Man and The Woman retired and had the deepest nap behind Lucy Cook's cheeky sense of humor. She has quite the resume. She has a master's degree from Oxford and published four books, including two about sloths. She has also presented wildlife programs for the BBC and National Geographic. The photos that the cook takes. The expeditions have gone viral, generating donations for conservation and crowds at conferences that mix biology with stand-up.
We humans are obsessed with speed, we idolize animals like the cheetah, capable of doing n to 60 in 3 seconds. So what are they cute or are they so? Ugly, they're cute, oh no, they're probably cute, but I mean, I think a naked morat is cute, so you ask the wrong person, you like a beist animal, yeah, bats, hyenas, I mean, there's a complete list of animals that I think you know, they just have extraordinary, strange and wonderful lives from the beginning, and just to me, they just add to the richness of the universe, just look how one of those beist animals can leave Lucy Cook Star Struck, you guys have to see while we were doing our On the road through the Costa Rican rainforest, the cook noticed what looked like spongy golf balls and realized it was a group of something we'd never heard of talk.
Come and take a look ch ch The elusive Caribbean white carp that makes bats look like they are, they are, they are. They are bats, but they are white and they live in these leaves. I like that my heart rate has increased. I'm going to start sweating buckets and I might start crying, actually because that's how it is. I mean, it's just a miracle of evolution, I mean, it's just why that sense of wonder that's as exciting as it sounds has made Lucy Cook a compelling advocate for sloths like them. She looks at the world from a different point of view.
The latest book is called I apologize, I really like you and your work, but yes, my book is called kitchen challenges. The narrative that in the animal kingdom, males are usually dominant and promiscuous, while females are submissive and monogamous. She traveled all over the world to collaborate. with scientists and studies dozens of animals reporting how pods of orcas are led by postmen and how tyrannical matriarchs control society mircat their reexamination turns parts of Charles Darwin's theories upside down Charles Darwin is a hero to me I studied evolutionary biology but he was a Victorian Man, so when he came to Brand, the female of the species, she came out in the form of a Victorian housewife, passive and chaste koi.
You know, we were kind of the female footnote to Macho's Main Event. Basically, I can hear people saying it's this organic wine. Well, it would be if it weren't true, so you just have to ask the hyena, for example the female spotted hyena, if she is passive and cor and she will laugh in your face after she bites her. You know, it's like challenging conventional wisdom. a big part of Lucy Cook's crusade to improve the reputation of sloths, but there's a bleaker kind of rehabilitation she wanted to show us. This is the toucan rescue ranch near the capital of Costa Rica, San José, so the sloths are incredibly strong and take care of sloths that almost died.
For power lines, how are the slots damaged? Most of the time it's electrocution, where he'll just look like this straight Vine that you know, running through the woods, and then they'll grab him and then they'll get electrocuted. Leslie, how was it? An occupational therapist who started the ranch 19 years ago, she now has a team of six veterinarians to treat electrical burns. Millions of years of evolution couldn't prepare sloths for human expansion, but veterinarians told us they believe sloths' slow metabolism somehow allows them to recover from injuries that could kill other creatures. Toucan Rescue Ranch also accepts orphans this is little Gio and this is maryn and then we have Landon here oh it's a little boy it's a little boy and this is our little Benji okay now my ovaries have Orphans can take up to 2 years to be ready for return to nature.
We watched as a female named Nisara prepared for her release. She was given a final checkup and a tracking collar before she was taken to a promising tree. she goes and if she falls asleep in the middle of the throw it's a bad thing, there she goes, it's a scary moment. Mission Impossible has nothing to do with this, like woohoo, with that big drama behind us, we headed to the Caribbean coast with Lucy Cook to visit. Another British scientist, Becky Cliff, is carrying out the first population study of sloths that might seem like a hanging fruit, but it is not.
Why is it so difficult to obtain scientific data on sloths? They have evolved over the past 64 million years to become Masters of They disguise themselves well, they are so good at pretending to be coconuts and birds' nests that they then hide from the very people who are trying to help them. None of the sloth species in Costa Rica are officially considered endangered, but Cliff says her staff is suddenly seeing it. There are fewer sloths and some suffer from a disease she suspects may be linked to climate change. We're having extreme periods of hot, dry weather and then extreme periods of prolonged cold and rain, and that's not what sloths have evolved to survive in.
What we're discovering is that the microbes in the sloth's stomach that they use to digest the leaves they eat, when the sloth gets too cold, those microbes die, so even though the sloth is eating and looking good, it is not digesting its food properly, so they lose energy and are becoming very weak, it sounds like they are starving, but with a full stomach, that's exactly it, it's a really strange phenomenon that I think only happens in sloths, but it's happening here to Cliff to collect the data that sloths have to collect, what branch is her, that's her colleague's full-time job, dear Leon, he climbed barefoot up a three-story-high tree covered in stinging ants, grabbed the sloth and then put it in a bag, come on little one, hello , that's awesome, are you too?
You have to do that every time you want to get a sloth and this is easy yes the stuffed sloth he is holding is not a trick it was used to comfort the real one as we helped replace a memory chip in a small backpack he wears the lazy one, oh you. You're very strong, very strong and then lean her back a little bit, come on honey, I'm going to trim those little things. This is like dressing a baby. W bam, what kind of information does this give you? We collect a lot of manual data in terms of what type of tree you are in, what height of the tree you are in, there is also a data logger in here that collects a lot of information about your behavior, so even the movements of your microbody They check in, here we go, yeah, that's it.
In one attempt, 32 sloths will receive backpacks and slowly return to the wild. Lucy Cook told us that she hopes this study will provide a deeper understanding of an animal. We can judge too quickly. What can we learn from the sloth? We can learn to be. we are slower and more sustainable because we need you to know that we are destroying this planet at an alarming rate and part of that is due to our addiction to speed and convenience, so if we take a few leaves from the lazy book, carefully digested slowly you know that We could save this beautiful planet and all the amazing creatures that live on it.
I'm Cecilia Vega, we'll be away for the next two weeks as CBS celebrates New Year's Eve live from Nashville and airs the Golden Globe on January 7th. Awards we'll be back on January 14th with an all-new edition of 60 Minutes Merry Christmas and happy new year on CBS Evening News we focus on Money Solutions tonight look at tips for protecting your personal information we look at a store and say how can we make it relevant to people's lives so this is what we eat to live longer? Find solutions that give people in-depth context. How much money can we spend on groceries?
Find solutions to health problems based on all the doctors you have talked to. what parents need to know Finding solutions to help people understand what the right decisions are for you and your family we take a closer look at an important decision that a growing number of women are making information is knowledge and knowledge is power CBS Evening News with Ni O'Donnell on CBS and streaming on Paramount Plus

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