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SpaceX Cargo Dragon’s 27th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-27) #spacex #CRS27 #falcon9

Mar 25, 2024
Now, in just about five seconds, Dragon transitions to internal energy. The Falcon 9 computers will enter launch mode, which is when the Falcon 95 computer, there it is, the

dragon

is counting down, that's when the Falcon 9 flight computers take control of the countdown and will guide the rocket. the last few seconds before liftoff, follow the logic, okay, both stages are now pressurized for launch, at launch the International Space Station will be over the Indian Ocean south of India at an altitude of 261 statute miles T minus 30 seconds looking for NASA and

spacex

number 27.

commercial

resupply

mission 15 seconds T-minus 10. nine eight seven six five four three two one engine at full power and takeoff of the crs-27 go falcon go

dragon

Falcon 9 rises from the dragon launch pad now en route to the Station International Space Station with important new scientific experiments and cruise supplies.
spacex cargo dragon s 27th commercial resupply services crs 27 spacex crs27 falcon9
Stage one chamber pressure is nominal plus 40 seconds. The Falcon 9 has historically successfully taken off from Florida. We are now reaching our Max Q in about 20 seconds or so, which is the point of maximum aerodynamic pressure. the vehicle will pass during its flight thanks Hugh and there is a call for Max Q. Next are five consecutive events, first is the main engine cut-out or Mikko, which is when the nine Merlin 1D engines will be shut down in the first stage. After those nine engines shut down, the first and second stages will separate. It will also be called through the networks as stage separation, then the first stage will rotate and then the first stage will rotate to return to its landing site, the Drone ship named. a Gravitas deficit, the second stage will ignite its Merlin vacuum engine to propel Dragon into low Earth orbit during scs-1 and the final event is the recoil boost to slow the first stage in preparation for atmospheric entry and this whole sequence. will take place for about 30 seconds or so, now we should hear that call of the four main engines shut down in about 20 seconds from now.
spacex cargo dragon s 27th commercial resupply services crs 27 spacex crs27 falcon9

More Interesting Facts About,

spacex cargo dragon s 27th commercial resupply services crs 27 spacex crs27 falcon9...

A wonderful tracking shot of our rocket Nico's state separation is confirmed in reconnaissance and there are all those calls for those Milestones, so We had Mikko's stage separation, a second start of the stage one engine and the start of recoil of partial boost, while a boost recoil is normally performed to return the first stage to one of our landing zones. Here we are only performing a partial ignition. The short recoil thrust possible due to the weight of the payload will allow us to recover the Falcon 9 booster much closer to shore and shorten the Drone ship's trip back to shore by approximately one and a half to two days. there is confirmation of the shutdown of the impulse.
spacex cargo dragon s 27th commercial resupply services crs 27 spacex crs27 falcon9
If you're just tuning in, you're watching a live webcast for the

27th

commercial

resupply

mission to the International Space Station for NASA. This is Spacex's 17th mission for 2023 and the Dragon's second flight to the International Space Station. This year we took off from Kennedy Space Center's historic Launch Complex 39a just 3 minutes and 45 seconds ago. On the left side of the screen is the first stage of the Falcon 9 returning to Earth and on the right side is the second stage. stage and you can see the mvac motor there as a reminder. Today's mission marks the seventh flight of this Falcon 9 booster which previously supported the Amazonus Nexus mission scs-22 isspaces haikido R mission one and three starlink missions now to make on its way back to our drone ship, there is a shortfall of You gravitate.
spacex cargo dragon s 27th commercial resupply services crs 27 spacex crs27 falcon9
He has two more burns to execute. The first is the intake combustion where three of the Merlin engines, one five and one nine, will be re-ignited. This helps slow down the stage as you re-enter. top of the Earth's atmosphere, the second combustion is the landing combustion and this is a single engine 9 combustion engine that quickly reduces the speed of the vehicle to land on the ship Drone now occasionally on your screen when the propeller is on is visible to you. Some bursts of nitrogen gas used for attitude control may be seen as the booster returns to the spacecraft Drone Falcon 9 is also equipped with four hypersonic grid fins located near the top of the first stage and once in the atmosphere, stage one is using only the grid fins to steer while returning to Earth, these titanium grid films will orient the rocket during re-entry and guide the rocket during descent and there is a call for trajectories ratings on the left side of the screen. just make out some Earth civilization on Earth in about eight seconds from now we should see the recording of the first stage entry start saving right now on the right side of the screen.
I don't currently see that you can currently see stage two. and there is confirmation of the start of the first stage intake combustion and I probably saw it again too. This is the first of two burns the booster performs before landing on the Drone boat stage one intake burnout as we approach the first stage. The landing is good. It should be noted that the first stage of the Falcon 9 is equipped with four landing legs made of cutting-edge carbon fiber with aluminum honeycomb and which are placed symmetrically around the base of the rocket and deploy just before landing, if this landing Is successful.
This is the 178th time we have recovered a first stage booster including heavy Falcon 9 and Falcon missions and we are about 15 seconds away from landing, the vehicle is traveling at about 100 kilometers per hour and this really puts the rocket's slowdown in perspective. In the span of less than a minute we will have reduced the speed of an airplane from double to zero when the rocket lands in stage one. Landing on, that's the beginning of the first stage. Landing on left. Next to the screen, stage one, the landing leg deployed and there he saw the successful first stage of the Falcon 9.
Later, I can probably hear the gunshots behind me. The first stage of the Falcon 9 that supported today's Mission landed for the seventh time after previously supporting Amazonus Nexus SCS-22. isspaces hikudo R mission one and three starlink missions Today's landing also marks the 178th successful landing for an orbital class rocket, as mentioned above today's recovery operations are being managed by an all-female recovery team and this is a really great time for the industry and SpaceX. there's that call that the stage 2 FTS is stowed and we should shut down the second stage engine here shortly Boy, there's that Seco nominal orbital insertion exit call and there's the nominal orbital insertion exit key call In t plus nine minutes into the mission the last major task for stage two is approaching, which orders the separation of the Dragon.
In a couple of minutes we hope to have a video of the Dragon separating from the top of the second stage, which faces the trunk. CRS-27 will join Crew Vehicle 6. Currently in orbit, so we will once again have two Dragon spacecraft docked to the International Space Station. Signal loss is expected. Okay, as for

cargo

, today we will be delivering over six thousand pounds of scientific research crew supplies and vehicle hardware. The orbital laboratory and its crew To date SpaceX has sent and brought more than 270 thousand pounds of crew and

cargo

to and from the space station As a reminder, this is the third flight of this Dragon capsule that previously supported CRS-22 in June 2021. and CRS 24 in December 2021.
Once the Dragon capsule sheds the second stage, it has 16 Draco boosters, each capable of delivering 90 pounds of force and will be used for maneuvering, there are four pairs of three thrusters spaced evenly around the capsule, as well as four forward bulkhead thrusters beneath the nose cone, Dragon now notably has no super Draco thruster seats or life support systems as it is crewless and this saves weight space. and also allows for faster turnaround time and while they are initially designed. The dragon carried solar panels extended outward from the trunk, the cylindrical structure located directly behind the Dragon's capsule, the current dragon has these panels attached directly to the trunk and you may at some point see both the light side and the dark side of the trunk and that dark side.
They are actually those solar panels and the light side is a radiator to help cool the spacecraft and once the Dragon capsule reaches the ISS it will be able to dock autonomously using its navigation sensors, the Center Line camera and the equipment detection and light range. It is also good to note the Dragon capsule is connected to the trunk below it via the trunk claw and connects the thermal control avionics and power systems components between the trunk and the capsule and if you are just joining us , you are watching a live view of the dragon. successfully disconnecting from its second leg en route to the International Space Station this is the

27th

commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA this is

spacex

's 17th mission this year and the second dragonfly 2 station by 2023 We took off approximately 12 minutes and 23 seconds ago from the Kennedy Space Center at historic launch complex 39a and there you can see Dragon slowly moving away from the second stage.
The next milestone that appears is the opening sequence of the nose cone that protects the docking ring and navigation sensors and that will do it for me. Here in Hawthorne, so I'm going to tell Dan in Houston. Hello, thank you very much Zach and hello everyone once again from Mission Control Houston. It's great to see another dragon in orbit. You have a happy team here at Mission Control. and we will have a happy crew of seven astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station when they wake up tomorrow with the dragon on the way, as Zach said, the next milestone we will be keeping an eye on will be opening the nose cone, this takes a couple of minutes and that's opening up the nose cone so it's exactly what it sounds like, it's on the top or part of the nose of the dragon and it will slowly open to reveal a couple of different components.
That nose cone stays closed during the flight to orbit just to protect some of those more sensitive instruments from the thermal and aerodynamic loads that the dragons experience on their uphill journey, once it opens we'll reveal a couple of different things that They include some propulsion elements mainly for the forward bulkhead Draco thrusters, those are the main thrusters the dragon will use for its higher Delta speed, so all of those are just firing the engines to gradually raise its orbit as it approaches More and more space station will also reveal a set of navigation equipment. Dragon has a couple of different methods of essentially finding its way through outer space and under the nose cone there is something called dragon eye star trackers and then it will also be combined with an inertial measurement unit and GPS sensors, all of these They work together to essentially tell Dragon where he is in outer space and where he should go.
We also do what's called a state vector upload to the spacecraft just before launch, telling it where the space station is and then once it gets closer, we'll have what's called relative GPS systems that we can talk to each other. yes between the dragon and the space station as they are, essentially, they start talking to each other, they let them know where they are and they are very useful when we start to get into integrated operations, which you will see a lot more in this room once we let's arrive on Thursday morning, since when we are in integrated operations we have a team. here in Houston and a team in Hawthorne that are working to bring us the dragon, but we are getting closer to that nose cone to start opening.
There are 12 hooks around the Dragon spacecraft's essentially docking ring, six of them are actually holding. the nose cone in place during launch, all 12 are closed when we are launching and we open them if you have seen any of the previous crew missions or even the cargo missions, we do them in two different sets, two sets of six, so one set is already open, the second set is now open and once that second set is open, the nose cone will start to deploy and that nose cone takes a couple of minutes to open, usually about five minutes more or less and it will gradually open its oscillations. open a little over 110 degrees which gives Dragon enough room to dock with the space station as this will also reveal the docking ring and that is what Dragonwill be used to dock with the onboard international docking adapter. the station and we head to the forward port, we have two of those on the US segment right now with the docking adapters, the forward port and Xena through the port facing space on node 2, the harmony module and this dragon is going to be bound for the forward port, the Dragon Endurance Crew 5 crew vacated it at home over the weekend after 157 days in space and this dragon is destined to start about a month instead of really intense scientific and cargo operations. but right now one set of hooks opens, we're still waiting for the second set of six to open and then once that happens the nose cone will start to deploy shortly after that, Do checks on those forward bulkheads , Draco, those four drakes that are hiding under the nose cone right now and once they are checked, we will be pretty much ready to go and as Dragon will start to do his different phases, Burns to get to space.
The station sounds like we have the five or six of the second set now open and on standby and it looks like the nose cone has started to deploy, so again this will start in a couple of minutes for the nose cone. to open fully but all the hooks are open and the nose cone is deploying while we wait for the nose cone to open I want to bring we have a guest very quickly we have Phil Dempseyhe is the manager of the vehicle integration office at NASA's International Space Station program, basically the guy that oversees all the different spacecraft responsible for getting crew and cargo to the space station. uh, bill first, thank you so much for joining me, I just want to know what you think real quick.
Tell us, you know we have another dragon mission heading to the station, what will this mean for the crew members on board? Hey, yeah, thanks. First of all, I just watched a great launch from our SpaceX team here in Florida. You know, getting new dragons is really exciting for the group for a couple of reasons. You know first, as you just mentioned. These cargo missions are truly action-packed times for the crew. You know it starts when they dock on Thursday morning. enter the vehicle to do some critical research on its location on the ISS, you know, so the crew does some standard cargo operations and payload movements during this 30-day intake, but while they're doing that, they're also doing some critical research that It really has to be completed during the documentary mission so you can put those results back into that same vehicle when it goes down a little over 30 days after it went up, then it's time to repackage it with hardware.
Furthermore, these cargo missions are the few possibilities. We have to bring fresh or refrigerated food to the crew so they know we're giving them a little taste of home. They have some fresh fruit and cheeses in this one and I know they're asleep, but I think they're going to do it. they'll be very excited when they wake up, we actually have some live views now of the nose cone opening, we're halfway through, but Phil, Before I Let You Go, just general feelings on your part, the show, this one has It's been just another incredibly busy spring, it feels like we're always in peak season with the season.
We just brought one crew home over the weekend after launching another. What has it been like to balance all the traffic going to and from the space station? Yeah, you know, it feels like we're halfway there and there's a lot going on, it's really exciting, you know, pace-wise, most of us probably wouldn't have it any other way, I'll tell you, you know, we're in our third decade of operating this orbit. research facility and these are the crew and cargo missions to keep it going, but if you look ahead, add them to that mix, you know we have an upcoming Boeing first group flight, we have a second private astronaut mission, so, Busy times, I sure know it's really inspiring what we're doing in this industry.
The dedicated and excellent partnerships with NASA commercial suppliers and international teams are really exciting for the program and we are very proud to be a part of it all. Well, again, that was Phil Dempsey Phil, thank you very much for calling and Phil is the vehicle integration office manager for the International Space Station program for NASA. Thanks Phil, okay, thanks, have a good night. You too, we are very well. Now that we are close to the nose cone being open, it looks like it only has a few more degrees left and we will sit still and wait for confirmation in the loops to hear that again, once we open the nose cone it will be Dragon's moment. to reorient, uh, to maneuver for some Draco checks on the forward bulkhead and then that's going to be the last thing we do for the next few minutes before it's time to start those Burns phases and as he was talking there, we actually heard the nose.
The cone is now open, so Dragon is already moving through its automated sequence, getting ready to perform checks on those forward bulkhead thrusters and then once they're done, they'll be configured and ready to go and ready to perform. our phases. Burns, it's really cool to have a dragon back in orbit the 27th resupply mission to the International Space Station on the way a healthy and safe Dragon carrying over six thousand pounds of cargo with the nose cone open Draco is in the process of payment that will do it for us here in Houston we will be back Thursday morning to guide you through the final moments of the dragon's approach and docking with the International Space Station, but since everything was successful today I will send it back to close things with Jasmine at the Kennedy Space Center.
Thank you very much, Dan, another one. beautiful launch from the space coast this afternoon that will conclude our coverage for the launch of NASA's 27th Commercial Resupply Services Mission and SpaceX dragon is now on track to dock with the International Space Station on Thursday at 7 52 a.m. ET and We'll have live coverage of that at 6:15 a.m. at NASA on television and on nasa.gov slash live thanks again for joining us and we'll leave you with a replay of today's launch, but until next time, go NASA, go SpaceX, and go CRS 27. seconds T-minus 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 engines full power and liftoff of the trx27 go falcon go dragon Falcon 9 takes off from the dragon launch pad now en route to the International Space Station with important new science experiments and supplies for the crew the pressure of the stage one two is nominal

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