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Sanding, Polishing, & Seasoning Lodge Cast Iron Skillet

Jun 03, 2021
Have you ever felt frustrated when

seasoning

a

cast

iron

skillet

? The rough surface never seems to smooth out. I'm going to show you how using some

sanding

discs and a little bit of effort. You can get this stuff nice and smooth, still accepting

seasoning

s and cooks really well. Join me and I'll show you how I used this Lodge, bought it at Costco. It was a pot and pan mix, and I'll show you how to make it nice and soft on the inside. Now there are some pitting and I want to make it clear to you that this is something you will want to do on a

cast

iron

part that is maybe in the $50 range.
sanding polishing seasoning lodge cast iron skillet
If you have a poor quality casting it may be very rough on the inside, or almost never use it. It's worth next to nothing, it's a camp set, or it was a piece you got as a gift and you never got the hang of it, you didn't like the weight, or maybe you didn't like cleaning it, and I'll show you how to sand and polish that to a finish almost mirror and then I'll show you how to cure it. I'm not doing anything out of the ordinary here. I learned a lot about this from some people on YouTube and some forums I've read.
sanding polishing seasoning lodge cast iron skillet

More Interesting Facts About,

sanding polishing seasoning lodge cast iron skillet...

If it weren't for these people, I wouldn't have been able to gather the amount of information that is required to do something like this, and I really want to thank them for not making it a point to put that in their videos. I just took everything they put in there and compiled it and I'll show you how I did it. I'm taking circular

sanding

discs ranging from 40 grit and then I'm going to end up with 180 grit in this video you'll see the surface for paddling so please stay tuned and thanks for joining me. This is the mounting bracket we are using to do our initial sanding.
sanding polishing seasoning lodge cast iron skillet
Now you'll notice that I'm marking the pot on that piece of wood and that's a very large piece of wood, it's a piece of scrap that we have. If you have something smaller than that, it will work. I just had it available and I'm going to put it in the vise and it will hold tight and steady. Now when I marked the holes, you'll see that little black pattern there. Using a pilot, I drilled a few pilot holes right at those center marks that will house the eye bolt and hook pattern I created. It's not, you know rocket science here.
sanding polishing seasoning lodge cast iron skillet
You're just going to drill a few holes. Make sure the holes are big enough to fit the hooks that are in place. Eventually when you put this in you mount it, if they're not in the right place they won't hold the cast iron very well. Just below, on the bottom right, you'll see the bolt that I'm putting into these holes. Now here's the earlier shot of the cast iron that is the

skillet

you'll see some pitting there on the top right hand side of that skillet but it's pretty rough and that's from the sand cast you know when people tell me how good the skillets are Lodge are, I agree, the metal and the shape is pretty easy on the eye, let's smooth that out.
This is the mounting bracket as you can see it's held in by that pretty strong vise and it's not going anywhere. I put a little clamp on the back, but if you look at the back, it's very simple, here we have a bolt and the eyebolts that turned into a hook. All simply passing through the back held by some nuts. Okay, excuse my camera angles. It is important that you see that we are going to use this Advanti Quick Strip disc. It's a little used, it's rounded up there and if you want to start with a new one, that's great, but these things will last quite a while.
I've made several pots with that drive or pans I should say. Then we're going to move on to these Diablo sanding discs. If you're going to use these, I'd suggest getting the 180 grit and then the 40 grit. I just bought a package that had the mounting bracket you'll see for the drives in there. I will only be using the 40 grit sanding pads and the 180 grit sanding pads for this project if you want to go higher you are more than welcome. Now notice how I'm going up and down in that pan in no particular pattern. I'm just trying to get all that seasoning out, all those initial rough edges where all that sand casting is created from, you know those rough steel surfaces.
I'm smoothing them out, that's all I'm doing here. Take your time to push yourself if you want to. What I found with Avanti's fast draw disc is that it is not a real match for this cast iron. It's going to take that initial roughness away, but it's not going to go down the way you want to see that arena and just knock it down. I bought two sets of these at Costco for $50, they were on sale. I would suggest that you are not going to put doing this on anything of value. Some people say don't do this project, this is what you know, so throw it out, just season it properly and you'll be fine.
You know, I would say that the older cast iron that everyone loves so much, was pre-sanded after the manufacturing process before drying and going out into the field. You had that option to sand it down before you seasoned. For years people cooked on it and the surface was nice and smooth and it took that seasoning pretty well. Today's cast iron doesn't offer that and you know a few of them you know I have some Finex pans and they are machined flawlessly and when you get them home you will see that it has literally a smooth machine just like you. he knows uniform rings that grind in that pan.
If we can take a closer look, sorry about the jiggling there, you'll see I've taken the initial roughness out there, but there's still pit marks like on the top right hand side, you see that little darker pit mark there. But it's brilliant. When you first do this, that shiny look will make you tingle inside. Now here's the mounting bracket, just put it on that hook there on that handle. Then we put the bolt on the other side with some washers and a nut and we're going to hold it in place. I didn't show you that I had readjusted that eye bolt or hook because the pan is a little deeper in there, but it works. just the same hole patterns are in the same place.
I'm squeezing it. I'm not too worried about it bending. People said you're going to bend that handle and make it crack, we're not putting that much stress on the cast iron. All we're doing here is holding it against that wood so it doesn't move. You'll see that initially I start with this Advanti Quick Strip Disc and it wiggles a bit and I have to readjust the nuts and washers to get tight. If I may suggest something, if you look at me right now, I'm wearing safety glasses, hearing protection, and a mask, a respirator mask, and if you look at the OHS regulations, you know that safe exposure to dust is safe.
Certain dusts are much more dangerous than others and cast iron and steel dust when it forms dust is dangerous to a certain level it's not as dangerous as silica or asbestos but when I first did this project it was in my lungs and it didn't escape my lungs for a few days. We're talking like rusty black mucus through the nostrils that tasted like rust, it wasn't, I mean it was kind of exciting at the time, but you know I should have worn a mask and I wanted to make sure I wore that mask this time. It's not shown here, but after I finished this process, it was covered in a film of steel dust all over.
If I may at this point, I'm going to say that you know that the Advanti Quick Strip disc gives you that comfortable feeling of using that drill and you know that I would say if you're going to do it, go for it, but if not the sanding discs. it will suffice, they will just wear out much faster than the initial grind due to the rough surface you get from sand casting. Eventually I'll show you that you know the back shot here and just like the pan it's nice and smooth and shiny it will make you feel like you've accomplished something but don't stop at the Advanti. stage.
Get out those sanding discs and really work that surface, make it nice and smooth and the guys will say ok why? Why make it so smooth? there is no reason why we don't buy stainless steel or you can buy carbon steel and you know you can do it. I have no problem with you guys doing that. Out of curiosity I wanted to see if this could be done and it seems to me that working with cast iron is not as difficult as it seems. You have to follow a few rules, but being able to get it in and out of the oven and having the ability to put it on any type of stove, whether it's gas, fire, campfire, induction, it's so versatile and if you treat it. well, he will treat you well for literally your whole life.
Imagine spending $50 on a cast iron piece and giving it to your children's children, that's how long the material lasts, so let's take a look here to see if it's nice and smooth. the strip disc just doesn't get into the corners as well as you'd like. I got most of the seasoning and most of that rough edge shouldn't say edge than sand casting. Now this is the 40 grit sanding disc I used from Diablo. I bought all my stuff at Home Depot, you can buy it anywhere you want, but you're going back and forth like you're sanding a floor.
You're not going to do as much damage as you would sanding a floor, but you're going to remove the metal and you'll see you'll see the metal you know explode in these big puffs of dust coming out. -4C I think it was pretty nice outside that day. I have an airy room here that I'm using the doors literally open to the outside. You want to remove as much of that metal as possible. You are going to go through several 40 grit disc pads. I said before use the velcro version unless you really like to remove bits of sandpaper from the bottom of this rubber jig or mounting bracket because the punch is that it will ruin your fingers.
It ruined mine I should have I should have gone to the velcro I just didn't do it this time I don't know why. I'm not showing you the 180 grit sanding of this. I think I've shown you enough of an example of how to sand the surface. Get comfortable with it. I'm going to show you what it looks like with 40 grit, you'll see there are visible scratch marks inside of There. Most of that sand casting is smooth. Some of the deeper areas, you know, I spent a little bit more time and went a little bit deeper there.
You can go, you know you can remove half a millimeter and be safe with that pot. I was good, you know I'll show you what happens after a hundred and eighty here. I washed them with soap and water and dried them and they are nice and shiny, you'll see how shiny it is. My first video, that's what I wanted to see. I was going for that stainless steel look, but you really don't want to end up with a shiny look. What you want to do is put this in an oven clean cycle of your oven. Let the oven get nice and hot.
Anneal tempered metal by letting it cool and then you'll get this grayish metal that results from that. Now after the seasoning, I'll show you the seasoning process here. It will look nice and with a gray patina. It will blacken over time, but that's beautiful, that's what you're looking for to make it nice and smooth. The surface still has some blemishes and isn't perfect, you know I'm not a perfect person at this yet, but I'm happy with the results that are. If you're going to spice this up, I'd suggest using the links you're seeing right in front of you on this page. "The Culinary Fanatic" "Boedy Pennington" these guys have really great methods for seasoning and it's not about all that oil and just letting it go, it's about a small amount of oil that you let plasticize or season and then do multiple layers of that. .
Thanks for your time, thanks for looking and trying this yourself, it's well worth it.

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