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President Obama in conversation with Giannis Antetokounmpo, Kevin Love, and Chris Paul

President Obama in conversation with Giannis Antetokounmpo, Kevin Love, and Chris Paul
- Welcome, everybody, good afternoon. - Good afternoon. - Welcome to Chicago, my hometown, for those of you who are not from here. We decided to welcome you with the appropriate weather for the most part, I think you survived it, and we are gonna get started with an incredible panel that I am proud to sit here and try to facilitate. And I think the introductions are coming next. Do we have a particular order, Sam, that we wanna do that? - The first guest. (moderator laughing) - Sometimes you save the best for last. 44th

president

of the United States of America. (audience applauding) Mr. Barack

Obama

. - I don't need no introduction. - Needs no introduction but we have one. The reigning MVP of the NBA, among other things,

Giannis

Antetokounmpo

. A man who helped define the position now of power forward,

Kevin

Love

. And just one of the great point guards in the history of the game, Olympian

Chris

Paul

. (audience applauding) - Oh man. - All right. - Uncle B., what's up? (audience laughing) - It's good to see you people. Welcome to Chicago for those of you who are not natives. It is always sunny and warm in Chicago. This is unusual, isn't it? - The sun yesterday was unusual. (laughing) - That's true. Good to see you, Michael, thank you so much for agreeing to do so. - Thank you for having me, and I know you're probably wondering, so what are we doing? And even as we have discussed this, the

president

and I, and we just talked backstage a little bit, about...
president obama in conversation with giannis antetokounmpo kevin love and chris paul
what it is we hope to accomplish. Hey, look, we're here for basketball, there's no question about that; the All-Star game is what we're for. I don't know how it took us this long to get a second All-Star game, but it did. We're here for basketball, but that's not what we're here for. One of the things we're really gonna talk about is the other career, and the other career when these gentlemen are finished, and I know each one of them has a lot more basketball life in him. Those careers are gonna become more important, if they're not already. And by just researching, and even though I've known

Kevin

and

Chris

for a long time, it was interesting just looking at in detail at the work that they do, as we hope to just help the lives of people improve. And we're here in Chicago, as I've mentioned. I

love

my hometown, I know what it is, and what it isn't. And it's probably a very appropriate place to have this discussion about how we invest our time, our emotion, our finances in the efforts, 'cause most of the people involved here this weekend are from some urban area, probably 80%. And what are we doing in those areas, and the

president

knew when he was talking to these three gentlemen about participating about their kind of investment, their level of investment and commitment. And so we're gonna start there actually. We're gonna jump right in, if we can, and I'm gonna start with

Chris

. It was just interesting...
president obama in conversation with giannis antetokounmpo kevin love and chris paul
reading, refreshing myself about your foundations which I have known about but, I mean, you do so much work. All three of you have multiple communities. You have the communities you come from. You have the communities of your profession, of your professional basketball expertise. And we get to

Giannis

, he's got multiple countries in which that he's already invested. But,

Chris

, take us a little bit through what you were doing, why you were doing it, and you have foundations that partner with so many other important causes, starting, rooting in North Carolina, but bring us up to date about what you're doing and why. - Oh man, first and foremost, I wanna say thanks so much for having me. This is an honor and a privilege to be up here with these guys. And for me, I've had so many different stages in my career. We was just in the back talking about

Giannis

, who just had his first child, which congratulations. - Yes! (audience applauding) - I have all these different stages. I can remember the NBA before kids, before marriage, even though I

love

my wife, I remember all these different stages-- - They were bad memories. (audience laughing) - All these different stages of my career. And when I first came into the NBA, one of my biggest passions, we were refurbishing basketball courts. We used to refurbish basketball courts all over different cities, and then once I had kids, one of the things that really became my passion was my son, who's not little, but...
president obama in conversation with giannis antetokounmpo kevin love and chris paul
lil'

Chris

was five, and me and my wife was touring a school, and we were walking around the school, and we were looking at all these SMART Boards, and we were looking at all these iPads, and all this nice stuff at the school. And my wife asked me what was wrong with me, and I was getting mad, I was getting upset, because I started to think about the fact that, yes, my son will have this opportunity, but the kids growing up on the other side of town, they won't, they won't. And so as a kid, you don't really have a say-so on how you're gonna be educated, so our foundation from that day forward, we started to try to level the playing field, so we started to go into the underserved communities, and started refurbishing the boys and girls clubs, or putting learning centers and learning labs, and trying to make sure that they had all that advanced technology that the kids on this side of town have it. - We're gonna-- (audience applauding) We're gonna skip around a little bit, because each person has something that is clearly identifiable. I probably have listened to

Kevin

talk about this, and I don't even know that I was all that comfortable asking about it in settings, but he has become so incredible at talking about something that men, particularly athletic men, strong me, accomplished me, don't talk about: mental health. And

Kevin

has, and it's been a couple of years now of just inspired and inspiring

conversation

.

Kevin

, before we just...
get into what you're doing, how did you have the courage? You know how difficult it is to talk about this. This is not something guys do. What pushed you to the point where you could talk about the investment in being healthy, mentally as well as physically. - Well, it wasn't always easy for me. I mean, I've suffered from really acute anxiety and as well as depression my entire life. It's something that I wasn't comfortable ever talking about, or ever exposing it at, really, any capacity. I mean, some of my best friends, even family members, didn't know. The crazy part is two years ago, to this day, I was in LA, I was behind the curtain. You guys did media today at practice, Jackie MacMullan takes me behind the curtain, very acclaimed writer for ESPN, and starts asking me all these questions about where do you see mental health in the NBA, and what's the landscape with young men as well. So it was actually two days, I mean, two years to the day where I decided I was gonna write my article in the Players' Tribune and just express that not only myself, having an on-court panic attack in a moment that was life-changing for me, also dealing with depression, but knowing that everybody within an arm's distance, somebody you guys know is dealing with something that you can't see. It's not like an ankle sprain, it's not I hate pointing at you guys talking about injuries. (audience laughing) - Don't look over here. - Yeah, yeah. -...
None of that. - Actually,

Chris

about a week ago, we just saw each other, he got elbowed in the game by a rookie, he was talking all sorts of shit, excuse me. - Right. - He showed me his lip, so it was a real thing, so

Kevin

Porter Jr., I'm gonna have to have some wars with him, but. (audience laughing) Fast forward, I'd had my panic attack on November 5th against the Atlanta Hawks in 2017. And fast forward, I just felt that it was time to stop living in the shadows, and living in a place where I was afraid really to be myself and play all of my cards, so I wrote the piece in the Players' Tribune. And then the outcry and the outpouring of support and community as a whole, just experiencing it head-on from my childhood all the way up till now. And seeing the vast numbers that came out to support, I think it was within the first three days there were 6000 emails that we got, and 10000 emails within the first week, and that continued even to this day. We started about 18 months ago, the

Kevin

Love

Fund, which was to inspire people to live their healthiest lives while providing tools for both the physical, 'cause kill the body, the mind will die, and emotional wellbeing, whereas now, it's really four separate pillars, it's erasing a stigma. I mean, people have to be willing to talk about, it's both men and women combined, boys and girls, it's education, knowing that we wanna get to, I mean, the top of the top, K through 12. We've already...
started it at the college level. So we have education research. We're gonna make sure we have the tools and research, those go hand in hand as well, working with UCLA, we're working with Stanford, working with Harvard as well, the Cleveland Clinic. And I've been very fortunate actually to play in places like, in LA, like Minnesota where we have some of the best in healthcare at our disposal. So that's something, moving forward, that's gonna be great for us. There was a chair endowment at UCLA, which is the first one in history, for their psych department where we're just enable and inspire people to there to just help the masses, and the ideas within the next five years to help a billion people, and continue to pay it forward in a big way, 'cause I'll keep saying, this thing doesn't discriminate, it doesn't care if you're from North Carolina, it doesn't care where you're from, in Greece, South Side of Chicago, suburban Portland, Oregon, I mean, it just doesn't discriminate, and it transcends any socio-economic status, race, gender, profile, no matter what it is, this is super important, mental health. And just looking at the numbers, I felt that... We're sitting here with the MVP, we're sitting with a guy, actually, I went on Basketball-Reference and looked up everything that you've done in your career-- (audience laughing) And it was-- - What did you find? (audience laughing) - I'm sitting here with two...
future Hall of Famers. But just your guys, I'll get to that in a second, your guys' reach and your ability to impact people is incredible. I mean, so I felt that in talking about mental health and seeing the numbers, and seeing the reach that I could have, it was very important for me to speak about this and continue to pay it forward, so I think we need to have these tough

conversation

s, I think it's very important to do that, and as I'll get to talking about it a little bit later it's really a young people problem. So I know that we'll get to that later, but I wanna give

Chris

some props on his 10-time All-Star, eight-time All-NBA, six-time steal-champ, eight-time six-champ, Rookie of the Year. - Do we need to make a trade? You need to travel with me. - I was like, I should've intro'd you, sorry, Mike. - That's all right. By the way, it's-- (audience applauding) I know

Kevin

can count his three Hall of Famers, future Hall of Famers up here. - You certainly will be, too. You guys know about this guy's award yesterday, too. (audience applauding) - Thank you.

Giannis

, you are in a position that is different than the two gentlemen to your right, and you've done so much already, and I know it's been under the radar, and it's time to be out on the radar, I hope, because what you've done in Milwaukee, which is almost a different city. I mean, I grew up 90 miles away. I went to Milwaukee for the first time in five years,...
last year for the playoffs, I couldn't believe what I was seeing. But also in Greece and I know future considerations in Africa, that is a lot of commitment for a young man. Tell us what motivates you, particularly as you deal with the immigrant community. - So first of all, thank you guys for having me. Just being on this stage with

Chris

Paul

,

Kevin

Love

, and ex-

President

Barack

Obama

, this is tremendous honor, never thought I'm gonna be here in a million years. You just asked me what motivates me is my family. Growing up, I think my mom and dad did a great job just raising us, and making us have great principles and how to

love

each other and how to be generous, how to be kind, all that. First of all, I'm just here to listen to you guys and learn from you guys, and know how to do this because, obviously, you guys, you're way older than me. - Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. (audience laughing) - I tell you what, you should be apologizing to everybody in the back, because when his family stood up, nobody saw them near the front. - Nobody saw. - I was like, man. - I didn't mean that way. - That was funny, that was funny. - In African culture, that's an honor to be called older; it's not considered an insult. - So what can I learn from these two guys is that you gotta use your platform. I think we're in a position that a lot of people do not, and we just gotta use our platform as best as we can, and one of the things that we did last summer, not just...
me, my family, was involved, a big part of it is that we partnered with Foundation Analysis, and we built court and not only we build court we had the academy that big kids could go and get educated and at the same time play sports, because when we were growing up, we had people that helped us, we had people that guide us. My parents and my dad used to work all the time to provide for us food, and it was hard for them. It was extremely hard for them, so we had people in the neighborhood, and imagine this, we were living in a white neighborhood, We were immigrants, immigrant parents with they were illegal, basically, so we had to have our circle really tight and really close, and trust people that we knew they wouldn't go behind our back and snitch on us, or want anything bad happen to us, so we trust people so that they were able to help us, lead us, and put us in a position that we are today. I'm the MVP. My brothers play basketball also. I'm in a position that we can give back. So, as much as I can right now, I really don't have a mission, but all I know is that people gave to me, I gotta give back, within Milwaukee, in the community, I try to help as much as possible, try to be involved as much as possible. I think one thing is that there's a lot of poverty going on in Milwaukee, so I try to be involved in the community and the different programs that I could just basically help as much as I can, and I'm a guy that try to be as private as possible,...
and with my family and with myself, I don't like talking a lot about it. As I said, I just try to help as much as possible. - Mr.

President

, you wanna jump in here? (audience applauding) - Well, look, part of the reason I wanted to convene these three, in addition to being amazing athletes, they're good people, and each of them are at different stages in their careers. You've got old

Chris

Paul

down at the end, and then you got the young guy, and

Kevin

somewhere in the middle. But each of them, I think, have shown character on the court but also off the court, and the work that I'm doing after the presidency is entirely focused on how do we lift up and identify and amplify and support the amazing next generation of leaders that are coming up, because what I discovered when I was

president

was that most of the big problems we face, whether it is poverty, climate change, criminal justice system that too often is broken, whatever issue you care about, usually there's some good solutions out there to be had. But the problem is that those solutions don't get implemented because of lack of leadership. And so often we think of leadership just as government, politicians, people who are elected, people who are in prominent positions, but actually to really bring about positive change, you need leadership everywhere, you need leadership at the grassroots, you need leadership in the business community, you need everybody all hands on deck, because usually change...
is not just a matter of passing laws, it's also a matter of changing culture and policy. So, let's just take the example of mental health that

Kevin

gave. This is something that is underdiagnosed in every community, as he says. Part of the problem is that from a policy perspective in the past was not covered the same way a physical ailment was. So you couldn't get insurance for it, which meant you had to pay out of pocket, and so that's a policy fix that when I was

president

, I said, "We've gotta create mental health parity, "so that mental health issues "are thought about just like a broken leg, "when it comes to insurance coverage," that's a policy issue. But what

Kevin

has also identified is, it's also a cultural issue, because frankly we, as a society, tell our boys, if you are good at sports, and you're tough, that's all that matters, and you win, and that's how we're gonna measure you. There was an amazing article a while back. This woman had interviewed all these young teenage boys, and it turned out that many of them had all kinds of stuff going on, but they could not talk about it, because society said, "No, you can't have a

conversation

." Whereas Michelle and my daughters, I watch them, all they do is talk. (audience laughing) This is how I felt, and this happened, and I was feeling this, and so they were creating support networks, and boys couldn't do that. So that's a social...
thing. And my point is is that leadership comes in many ways, and what I wanted to do was to lift up these three as examples of extraordinary leadership, they're just getting started. But there are also a bunch of young leaders who aren't playing basketball, they're not famous, they're not wealthy, but in their own communities are working with people who are doing re-entry work, or folks who are helping immigrants have their legal rights properly represented, or women doctors who are setting up women's health clinics to deal with the particular health concerns that are so often neglected in certain communities; they're leaders, too. And the goal of Michelle and I with the

Obama

Foundation is we wanna shine a spotlight on the ways that people are giving back, we want those folks to know each other, to start expanding a network of leaders across fields and across disciplines, and what I've discovered is is that there are amazing leaders everywhere, Michael, but they're separated right now. And we don't talk about what they're doing. And I appreciate the fact that

Giannis

is private but and I like that in him, by the way, he's just focused. You don't see him 'cause momma did a good job, so he's not running around, he's like, no, I'm in the gym, then I'm going home, which is great, but I do want you to be a little more public,

Giannis

, because you have something to give when it comes to giving back, and you can...
set an example for people, and that, I think, is the purpose of our

conversation

here today, and I'll talk a little bit more at the end about what the foundation is doing more specifically, but I just wanna say how proud I am of them. There's one last point I wanna make that I think is common with the three, with these three outstanding individuals. Each of them talked out of their own personal experience. So

Chris

got mad about when he say the resources in the schools that he can now afford to send his kid to, in part, because he knows what it's like in some of these other schools. And

Giannis

is talking about giving back, in part, because he remembers his mother working as hard as she could and still having to deal with a whole bunch of stuff that comes with being an immigrant. And,

Kevin

, from his own experience understood what it felt like when you felt something inside that you needed to deal with, but it didn't feel like it was sanctioned to be able to talk about it. We all have experiences like that, and the more we're sharing our stories and communicating about what it is that motivates us to do what we do and to give back, and we're making common cause and listening to each other, that builds bridges at a time when the country is very divided, and that's also part of the goal, I think, of the foundation is to break through some of the polarization that we've been seeing, and just the anger and the frustration and the suspicion and...
mistrust that you see building in our communities so much. Telling our stories like this, and hearing from folks who have powerful stories to tell, that's part of the way that we start bridging these gaps. (audience applauding) - Just one of the things that I wanna ask you about next,

Chris

, is you guys have a primary career that is demanding, yet you all have found the time to pursue, I can't use the word secondary, 'cause these are very important things, but your primary goals is dealing with a team and basketball and leading other players in the case of each of you. And what I'm wondering

Chris

is how difficult is that, because part of that using that platform is getting others to recognize what you're doing and act in their own specific ways, but how much time can you devote to it, how difficult is it. Do you feel pressure? How difficult is it? - You know it's funny, at the end of the day we wouldn't be sitting up here in front of you, if we didn't do what we do. Basketball is the reason it gave us this platform. You can act like it isn't but it is. So that's the thing that I respect the most about what

Giannis

was talking about is that there's guys who get to the league and you start drifting off somewhere, if it's rapping, if it's this or that, but you gotta realize that basketball is why even people wanna hear your music. You know what I mean? This gives us the opportunity to have a voice. So you can't ever lose...
focus of that, but also understanding that basketball is what I do but it's not who I am. You know what I mean? I think one of the biggest things in like I said, this is my 15th year, so I've had an opportunity to pay attention so much, and nothing against any of the networks or the media or anything like that, but one thing that they always do is put us against each other. If you all look at it on your TVs, it always says, such and such versus such and such, and so to tell you to be honest with you this is my first time really getting a chance to get

Giannis

talk like this, 'cause when we play on the court we both got the same mindset, let's get to it. You know what I mean? Before the game we're not chopping it up, after the game we're not, so I was looking forward to doing this to even hear, you know what I mean, like some of the things that he may have going on, because a lot of times they put us against each other so much that we forget to do what

president

, you're still my

president

, boss, you know what I'm saying,

President

Obama

said. (audience applauding) We forget, you know what I mean, to unite, and do things together because everything is always me versus him, me versus him, instead of finding out what he has going on, and saying, look, man, I would

love

to help donate to your cause, you know what I mean, to lend a note. And it's crazy, there's some guys in the league, and I'm not sure, but they got a thing called H20 or...
the Water Boys (mumbling). Is some of your teammates with that? - Yeah, Malcolm does that. - Malcolm Brogdon over at Indiana is doing some great work. - I see it on social media and then I read about it, and I saw something that said that I think $15000 builds a water well or whatnot, like we don't talk about all that stuff. You know what I mean? I think the more that, you know what I mean, I find out what

Giannis

' call is, what he has going on, I would

love

to help, you know what I mean, if they find out, but a lot of times it's so much of, you know what I mean, it's me versus him, how are we gonna do against him, you know what I mean, where we figure out here in the world, like he just said, we can be a more powerful impact if we do things together. Like, I'm mad at myself, Kev, you got a fund. I need to donate to Kev's fund, you know what I mean, 'cause he has a passion and things going on-- - You're going to now. - We are, we are, we sure are. (audience laughing) Well, Kev, no, no, I'm serious, I'm serious, and this stuff is real, like when we get on the court, of course, we're gonna go at it, we're gonna go at it, but I'm like two totally different people on the court and off the court. My mama knows, she on the court, we got to get to it. We got to get to it. But the more these are real

conversation

s, 'cause a lot of times if you go up to another guy on another team, and ask him what he got going on, like you said,...
it's a cultural thing, you look weak, you look weak, so it might not be during the game. When you're at the free throw line, I'm not gonna ask you what you got going, Kev, but after the game the more we communicate like this and talk, I think the more powerful we can be in so many different areas. -

Kevin

, have you been able to-- (audience applauding) Has there been any collaborative initiative or effort that you've been able to plug in to where people should plug in to you, because clearly that would boost this effort, and I don't wanna say, make it easier, but certainly that challenge could be meet, if it was collaborative. Is anything like that, 'cause

Chris

made me think about that point as well? - Yeah, I think just to piggyback off of what

Chris

said, I think us as athletes and

Giannis

was saying and what

Chris

was saying as well is that I got great advice my rookie year, and actually

Kevin

McHale gave it to me, another Hall of Famer, he said, "Chase the game and everything "that you wanna

love

will chase you right back." And actually LeBron and Mav, they had the "What's My Name?", the Muhammad Ali documentary. He said, "Boxing was just the way "to introduce me to the crowd." I think

Giannis

, you'll definitely find that it wasn't till I got 10 years into the league and I became super old that I really was able to look back, and realize I didn't have the presence of mind, I wasn't ready...
to be vulnerable. I think we, at least as Americans, celebrate people that beat their emotions into submission. Mr.

President

, I think that's kind of what you were alluding to in a way, so as a young man, I was taught by a father who was born in '49 that lived through Vietnam, he was 20 years old at the time, and had played in the NBA with some of the greatest players of all time. He came from a father who was a hard-ass. He came from a father who did the same thing; you just don't talk about it. For me, it was just a way to be extremely vulnerable and know that there was a bigger picture at hand, and that was what I felt was extremely important to do was to pay it forward in that way, but I think as far as you talk about initiatives, what we could do, I think it's just continuing to provide tools. Like I said, this thing doesn't discriminate. I'm very fortunate and blessed to be able to buy medication. I'm very blessed to be able to see a therapist and do cognitive behavioral therapy, which over time is actually shown to be better than medication, but not everybody has that. Not everybody has that at their disposal, so at my fund we're really trying to research and be science-based and find out what works and what's gonna be able to work for everyone, what's gonna be accessible. And I think that's what we're dealing with now in the second year of the fund is really doing that, and just an example is, we're using Headspace,...
and they've completely changed their format and their platform from just being a meditation app to now being a mental health space, and a place where people can go and really work on the mental side of things, because it's just something that really remains unseen. It's crazy that it's really a young people problem, and here I'm gonna throw some numbers at you is that one in seven kids in the US deal with a mental health issue, and half of those go untreated. One in 14 have an anxiety disorder and that's people in general. 300 million suffer from depression worldwide. But really where it hit me and I realized that something was really wrong was where I'm from and where I've played, so in Ohio and I grew up in Portland, Oregon. The second-leading cause of death in Oregon in ages 10 and 34 is suicide. There's a 10-year study in Ohio as well where it talked about suicide rates continue to trend in the wrong direction; in the last 10 years it's up 24%; and this is the crazy part, in ages 60 and above, and get this, 14 and below, it's up 80%, so that's where you find things like schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety disorder, depression, and so on and so forth. 50% of these are diagnosed, you're just starting to see symptoms at the age of 14. By 24 it's 75%, so these are really young people problems, where we need early intervention, we need to have these

conversation

s with our kids, and I think it's tough to do, whether...
you're a boy or a girl, no matter what you identify as, and those are tough

conversation

s to have, and I've been there, and I do think at those ages, kids are so much more susceptible to change, so you could really directly impact their North Star, the trajectory of their life by just having these

conversation

s and helping them. So we have to find a way at the fund to be able to have that intervention, because the brain is changing at such a rapid pace when you're that young, but you're not gonna notice it, so the behavioral changes are gonna come so far after the fact, and you're gonna say, where did that come from? So you need to check in, you need to find ways to intervene with your kids, and have these

conversation

s and find different tools, and I think that's a big part of what we're doing at my fund as well and raising money for. - I just follow real quickly, you didn't just-- (audience applauding)

Kevin

, you didn't change the

conversation

; you, in large part, particularly in the larger culture started it. Are you finding the stigma lessened? - I mean, I really feel like it's gonna go, and it really is going in the right direction, and it's having these tough

conversation

s. I mean, I talk about young people in the next generation, actually Parkland Florida was really part of my story. On the Wednesday, or I guess it would've been Thursday, getting to Los Angeles in 2018, I turn on the TV, I was actually sitting in the room...
with Courtney and Candace, what's up girls, and Parkland, Florida, was on the TV, and I'm thinking, not only what the kids and the parents and the people at the school but nationwide, even the guy that shot all the kids, what he was going through mentally, and how big of a uproar that caused and gun violence in general, but there was the big uprise by all those kids, it was really incredible. And then in Oregon, they went to the capital and they actually got mental health days. There was five kids that got mental health days, three to four mental health days per semester for kids to use, so you're seeing a youth uprise. I think it's 60% now, whereas in the past that wasn't even close to number seeing, going to a therapist or talking somebody as a sign of strength; it wasn't like that in the past. I mean, you come home from war, Vietnam, or you have PTSD, you don't talk about it; that's something you do not do. Like I said, it transcends, it's something that is very near and dear to me, 'cause I've experienced it, I've seen it firsthand, I've seen it in my family. And now it's the craziest thing, and like you said

Chris

, it's so much bigger than basketball, it's so crazy to see kids come to the game, I never thought I'd be sitting here, 'cause I didn't think I'd be strong enough to tell my story is literally you have kids come to the game with signs like hashtag, everybody is going through...
something, thank you,

Kevin

, and it blows my mind. Girls will come, and I had a girl come and sit courtside, her father just reached out to me, and sent me a tweet, and just the little things like that that help to pay it forward, put her in my seat, and she suffered from panic attacks, and then a year later her father messaged me, and said, "Hey, she's got straight A's in school, "and now her panic attacks have really gone away, "and she's doing great." Initially, it was, hey, let's just affect that one kid or try to affect that one kid, but it's really taken on a life of its own, because I didn't know that there was such a community out there, and gonna be such an outpouring of people that we're gonna show support. And I'll say this last thing just about mental health, and with people, I guess, that are either celebrity status, or people that would be sitting up here is that a guy that I, I use this all the time, this guy that I really, really

love

, Anthony Bourdain, you guys all know him, I watch his show, "Parts Unknown," I felt like I traveled the world with him, had the best best job in the world, he took his life game four of the 2018 finals, and that was like a hero to me, 'cause I wanted his job and I really

love

d him. And it just goes to show you that nobody's immune. Success is not immune to depression either, you're allowed to feel these things, you're allowed to share these things with...

love

d one. It doesn't even have to be a therapist, it could be the person sitting right next to you, in front of you, behind you. Nothing haunts us like the things we don't say, so I really make sure that you're having these tough

conversation

s. (audience applauding) Sorry, I get really long-winded. - It's (

Kevin

's laughter drowns out speaker) to hear that,

Kevin

.

Giannis

, I wanna go back to something you said that struck me, and I'm sure others, about the contacts that you had in your neighborhood that inspired you. Can you tell us a little bit more? I know I think I've read somewhere where one of them was a coffee shop that you went to, a relationship that you developed there. Can you tell us a little bit about the people and the situations that inspired you to this point? - First of all, I'm gonna talk about what Kev said, that a point in your career that you were really scared to open up, and when I talked earlier that now I'm trying to be private with what whatever I do, I think I was kind of at that point, I was scared to open up to the public about what I do, because my whole life I saw my parents hiding basically. They were immigrants, they were illegal, so kind of that stuck with me my whole life, so and I was scared to be out there. I was scared to hear other people's opinions about what I do, is it enough, am I doing a good job, or he's the MVP, he should be doing more, he should be doing less, so I kind of always never...
talked about it, never tried to put my name out there. And

Chris

Paul

is 100% right: Basketball is what I do; it's not who I am. And once I started this, you're getting getting a little bit more involved with the community. I went out there and talked with people, people shared their stories with me, and I'm the MVP, I'm

Giannis

, I'm the biggest thing in Milwaukee that ever happened in the past few years, so-- (audience cheering) - Talk your talk. (audience laughing) - So they expect me to have the answers, but at the end of the day I'm 25 years old, I really don't have the answers. I'm there to help to you, to do whatever it takes, whatever I'm capable to help you, to help the community, help your family in any way I can, but at the end of the day I really don't have the answers. The question you asked me about the people that helped us, growing up, thank God we had people, because, see, it was definitely tough. We had people that my parents put us around, that's their trust, and they were able to provide us with a meal. When I was, I think 17, I went to the guy at the restaurant, I told him, I said, "Can I work? "Can I work, can I help my parents? "Can I provide for my brothers?" He said, "No, that's not what you're going to do. "I'm going to make sure that your brothers go to school, "get their education, be safe, "and give them a meal every morning," so we had people...
around our community that did that for us, and that's what I'm trying to do in Milwaukee, that's what I'm trying to do in Greece, support my hometown, that's what I'm trying to do in the country that my parents was raised, Nigeria, Lagos, Ondo State, and Delta State, right, mom? So, yeah, that's it. - Can I say one thing real quick before you go on? - Yeah. - Like I said, me and

Giannis

have never really liked talked, talked or whatnot, but being a fan of the game. This is what I'd tell you, if somebody asked me, what is

Giannis

like? I'd be like, I don't know, I play against him, man, he come through Euro, stepping, dunking on everybody. Right, that's what I always say, but aside from that, and he would never know this, I think the coolest thing that I always see about him, 'cause I pay attention to stuff, is that even when you was just talking, a seat away your three brothers was just sitting here like just listening to you, everything you do, man, as I see you the happiest when you got your family around. So whether people say you're private or whatever, I see the genuineness in you. When you won MVP, who was with you? Them, you know what I mean, I can see that in you, man, that's dope, like I always got my family around, we roll deep. But that's one of the biggest things I respect about you, man, is that you're at your brothers' games, you're always with them, and that right now is how you're...
paying it forward, 'cause they see what you're doing, and so guess what, when they get the chance, they're gonna be doing the same thing, so respect, man. - Grateful, grateful. (audience applauding) Let me just pick up on a couple things that folks were just talking about. First of all, at 25, you should be focused on your job, whatever that job is, and you shouldn't have all the answers, and it would be unreasonable to expect people to have the answers, but you are becoming excellent, you are excellent and becoming more excellent, and Marc Lasry is very happy about how you continue to get more excellent every day. And,

Chris

, who's at a different stage, as

Kevin

outlined, he's been excellent for a very long time, as is

Kevin

, but all of us have core things we have to do. And our first obligation, obviously, is to do our jobs well, and then to the people who depend on us and are closest to us. Now that you're a father, you will find that nothing is more important than that investment. But what it also turns out is that even after you've set the example doing your job well, and loving your family, and looking after your children, we've all been put in a position where in some small, modest way, just like that guy who owned the cafe, there's something we can do that's gonna make a difference in somebody's life. He wasn't necessarily thinking this is the next NBA MVP, but what he saw was, this is a good family that's having...
a tough time, I like them, and I want to make sure that they have a shot, in a small way I'm making a contribution. And I think that's the key message I'm hoping that we all take away from these

conversation

s. Whether you are a superstar or you are somebody who nobody knows, in some small way you can make a contribution. And part of what's happened,

Kevin

you spoke, moving away, about the statistics, of mental health and anxiety and depression and a whole host of things, there's a social element to this as well, it's not just science. If you look right now at the opioid crisis, for example, where a lot of these suicides are occurring partly by virtue of firearms. We talk about the inner city and all the firearm deaths in the inner city, you look at statistically the firearm deaths due to suicide, they're growing out of a similar thing, which is when people start not having jobs, and they start losing hope, and the bonds of institutions fray, so that people feel isolated and alone, then those anxieties and issues and depressions there that we all have. You're less likely to get help, because people aren't talking to you as much, or there aren't as many resources, or people are more mistrustful. The fabric of societies start breaking down and each of our problems get magnified, because we're social animals and we help each other. And part of leadership that I've been seeing around the world, communities that are healthy, schools...
that work, businesses that thrive, they are able to create a community and build a sense that we're in this together, and we've got connections, and that we're investing in each other, and helping each other, and teaching other, and that is something that no matter how busy we are, how much work we're doing, we can do in some small ways, and then over time once you become an old man like me, you can do it a lot. And you guys are way ahead of the game in what you're already doing. But what I wanna emphasize, I think, that you shouldn't feel like you've gotta solve the world's problems. Just you setting a good example and, for example, you visiting a prison, in which you had a

conversation

with inmates who at some point are gonna need to be released, and them hearing from you that just like they've heard from me, 'cause I was the first US

president

to visit a prison and sit down with a bunch of young men, and say, "You know what, I was just like you. "I was just lucky "and one turn here or there, "I could've been in your seat instead of mine," and them hearing that from you is powerful. And them seeing that you care enough about them to talk to them directly, that's mind-changing, and so your influence will expand as your careers expand. And then we've all been remembering Kobe. The last

conversation

I had with him and Vanessa in LA, I asked him, "Do you miss basketball?" He said, "I...
don't miss it at all." "I don't touch a basketball," he said, "because I am now just as competitive "and focused on this second phase," and we were talking about how we could work together in the foundation to mentor and lift up young men of color who are at risk, and part of what you're doing is laying the foundation for your second act, and the incredible leadership and work that I think you're gonna be able to show in the future. You should know that you're well ahead of the game already. You're ahead of most 25 year olds in terms of how they're thinking about it, that I promise you. (audience members laughing) (audience applauding) -

Giannis

, it was so refreshing to hear you say, I don't have all the answers, 'cause whether it was 25 or 45 or 65, nobody has all the answers, but that candor is such a great place to start it seems to me and such a realistic place to start. Mr.

President

, I wanted to ask you how your foundation work maybe has changed, has the target changed, moved, has your mission changed at all in, say, the last six to eight years? - Well, look, I

love

basketball but I wasn't as gifted. (audience laughing) I had to make a decision early on, what's my work? What's the craft I'm gonna hone? And I moved to Chicago, because what I decided was that I cared deeply about creating a more just society and giving every child opportunity. I was effectively raised by a single mother. I...
had, during my teenage years, a lot of confusion and lack of guidance. I had been lucky to have a bunch of people who had helped guide me through that process, and I had been inspired by the civil rights movement, and the vision of young people mobilizing to bring about change, just with the moral force, just with being willing to walk across a bridge, even though they knew they were gonna be beaten, just by their willingness to speak truth to power about social justice and civil rights, so that's what had inspired me. And it turned out that I was pretty good at it, so I kept on going and we made progress and we made change. But what I realized when I left is that, left the presidency, I was meeting young people who were just like me when I was 20 or 25, who didn't have all the answers, didn't have a lot of contacts or connections, but had just as much energy, just as much talent, and by the way, I was meeting them all around the world, because we started doing these Young Leader's Programs, where every country I've visited, if I went to Greece, or I went to South Africa, or I went to Turkey, or I went to wherever I went, we'd have these convenings of young leaders who were doing great work, and you'd hear some young doctor who'd started a health clinic or you'd talk to some young man in a country where it's hard to speak out, 'cause there's not democracy there, but he's speaking out on behalf of democracy, in some cases,...
worried about being jailed, and you'd meet some activist who's dealing with environmental issues in countries where the business interests are really powerful. And I thought, man, if we could put them in charge, even though they don't have all the answers, I promise you, they're answers are a lot better than the people who are currently in charge. And it made me think that my job is to use the platform, the leverage, whatever authority I have, and connections I have, to essentially accelerate their rise, to empower them and to connect them, 'cause I wanna go back to something that

Chris

said. Yes, all the NBA players should be focused on their jobs, and that is being excellent at their game, but the collective power of athletes in this society... I never try to talk about other people's money, but the contract you all got. (audience laughing) The-- (audience laughing) (audience applauding) I think it's fair, it's coming, people. But-- (audience laughing) See, I'm not trying to stir anything up, but the point I'm making is is that when you look at what that represents collectively, it is extraordinarily powerful. You then think about the resources, the attention, the just amount of cultural space that's taken up, that's an incredible amount of power. And the question is, and this is essentially goes to the point about what the foundation is trying to do, what's true for celebrity athletes is also true for there are thousands...
of climate change activists around the world who, each one is doing great work, if we can connect them together, that's power. There are people across this country who are working on criminal justice, you meet them in every city. There's somebody who's working on a reentry program, or working on a diversion program, or making sure that somebody who's got a criminal record, but has turned their lives around can try to get a job, and the issue is how do we connect them, so that they have more power, they're not as isolated. And so the job, to answer your question, all this made Michelle and I conclude, our job is to just find that talent and empower, and if we can harness the energy of this next generation of people, some of whom are working full-time on non-profit issues and their causes. Some of whom they've got jobs, like these three, but are making contributions like

Kevin

, in terms of publicizing and facilitating. If we start doing that in a more systematic way, not kind of catch-as-catch-can way; I see you at the All-Star game, oh

Kevin

, I hear you're doing this, that's cool, I'll write you a check, which is nice. But rather, you start getting clearinghouses, here's all the things that everybody is doing. Are we doing similar things? If

Giannis

is just coming up, and he says to him, "I'm now ready to start doing something serious "back in Milwaukee about criminal justice reform," or for that matter, I wanna do...
something in Greece or in Nigeria to help young people here, wouldn't it be great if he was able to talk immediately to somebody who'd already done it, or he's able to find out from

Kevin

, oh here's the expert on mental health, if I'm starting to see mental health issues. So the idea of the foundation is if now, we're building a

president

ial center here in Chicago that is going to serve this specific community. We are essentially bringing what'll end up being a multi-hundred million dollar project, a major institution on the South Side of Chicago, usually these things are downtown somewhere. Our attitude is this becomes a anchor for the empowerment and development and job opportunities, but the center is primarily gonna be a training ground for all these young leaders in Chicago, but then it becomes the hub around which we are connecting with activists and institutions around the world, identifying these young leaders and empowering them, and giving them a platform, and making connections so they can learn from each other and work together, because I can tell you right now that there are 200 young leaders in Africa that we had a summit in South Africa, from 50 countries, probably 10 of them were from Nigeria, some of these are young members of parliament, some of them are health experts, some of them are entrepreneurs, some of them are journalists, human rights lawyers, whatever it is that you wanna do

Giannis

in Nigeria, there are 10 outstanding...
leaders, just a little bit older than you who've already started. So you may not have to reinvent the wheel, you may just need to connect with them. They would

love

to have you just even if you just did a PSA, a public service announcement for them, that suddenly blows them up. It doesn't take a lot of time, but it's a huge contribution that you're making to them.

Chris

, if you're working on education stuff, there are amazing activists, including my former secretary of education. I'm gonna give him a shout out, Arne Duncan, who was in the celebrity game, who's got he's always at the game. (audience laughing) Arne is working here in the city with young people who've been involved in violent crimes, but who are now turning their lives around, and he's paying them initially to train them, and then placing them in jobs and creating a wraparound set of programs to ensure that they succeed. So if

Chris

decides, man, I saw something in Carolina, my old community, I really wanna do something with these young people who have come out of prison, well, he doesn't have to suddenly start all over again. He can call a party right away, you've got a template for how you might make that work. So the goal of the foundation is to be that hub, that clearing house around which we can all support each other. It means everybody's lift is a little bit less. Everybody's got a way to contribute to that. And our legacy, hopefully, Michelle,...
I've said it, and maybe this sounds a little egotistical but it's in response to a lot of people, saying, man, we need you back, and when's Michelle running, and this and that and the other. And what we've said is you know what, our goal is there is a million Baracks and Michelles out there, of every race and creed and background, in every country there's tens of millions of them. They just weren't as lucky as us. And the question is, if we identify them, and give them a platform and a voice and train them, that's what's gonna save the world. Don't look backwards at who was there, look forward to who's coming, and our goal and job as a foundation is to make sure that we're doing everything we can to create the ecosystem where they can thrive and succeed. (audience applauding) - As somebody who was born and raised in the South Side of Chicago, I'm so glad we can look forward and see the original Michelle and Barack, and what's being built in the South Side, which, again, born and raised, and even though I read about, I follow every word I can every day, it's almost unbelievable. - Look. This will be not just a traditional museum, mausoleum, although, people, they estimate we'll get 700,000 million visitors a year, because they all wanna see Michelle's dresses, and maybe a few of my remarks. But it'll be state of the art, so it becomes a world-class exhibit space that tracks the history of social change through...
my presidency and highlights all the issues that people care deeply about, but most importantly, triggers them to activism. But it's also transformative 'cause you grew up here, you understand the North Side of Chicago does not look like the South Side of Chicago. Chicago has never looked more beautiful and I

love

this city, but last night six teens were shot about half a mile from where we're building this institution, and historically a message has been sent, look, this is well documented, it used to be parks in the South Side, they were famously underfunded, their field houses if you wanted to go play basketball and you're on the South Side, you did not have the same facilities or resources, and I'm not talking about way back in the 1920s, and talking about when Michael was growing up, and so the idea of bringing a world-class institution that is attracting international attention where I can, we're gonna have an athletic center, by the way, Nike is already helping out in the construction of that of an outstanding world-class athletic facility that is available for all the young people in this area, but also a theater space so that we can use the arts for young people to learn how to show leadership and express themselves. We're gonna have a recording studio, so if I called my friend Lamar or Jay-Z, or somebody, and say, hey, do a workshop with these guys, in terms of how do they channel and tell their stories, they don't have to go downtown...
to do that, there's a facility right in their neighborhood where they can start doing it. And our ability then to convene an international conference or a national conference on the South Side of Chicago, not just downtown, on issues of import, which then in turn gives businesses in those areas an opportunity to thrive, homegrown, and young people are being hired from those communities. What this does is it becomes both a model and an engine for change that then can be duplicated, as other cities look at how they can bridge those gaps and give people opportunity everywhere. Plus, it's just gonna look cool. (moderator laughing) - It's a very exciting time that none of us could anticipate before 2008, it was unforeseeable, even for people who were optimistic, I'm gonna dare say visionary, where was it gonna come from, where was the source gonna be? And now we know the answer to that, and so thank you can't be said enough for those of us were here before. (audience applauding) - One thing, maybe this isn't true of these guys, I'd be interested in hearing from them how they feel about it, but the odds of me being here as the former

president

of the United States are incalculably small. (audience laughing) I mean, if you thought about a mixed kid being born in Hawaii to a father from Kenya who left him and his mom when they were two, and named Barack Hussein

Obama

, I mean, there's no chance, but for all of us there is this sense sometime I think...
part of why when

Giannis

I was really relating to

Giannis

talking about like sometimes it must feel like a dream to you. There's this sense of like, wow, I still don't know how I got here, and all this that's happened given where I'm coming from, and it'd be interesting to reflect and hear these guys. Part of what we have to do is to remind ourselves, we've just been lucky; it doesn't mean we haven't worked hard, it doesn't mean we haven't done what we're supposed to do, bu there is just an element here of randomness to what happened to us, and that should create humility which I see in all these guys, not on the court but at least off it, and that's part of what makes you wanna give back, because when I see kids on the corner, I'm all like, "Well, "I'm not better than them, "they might be just as talented as I was, "but they just had a different set of circumstances "that led this way instead of that way." And I don't know if that's something that resonates with you guys, but I hope that's part of what inspires to in whatever ways you choose to do, to give something back. - For me, usually, I've used a lot of times the quote that I'm supposed to be here, and a lot of people get mad, telling me. - Me neither. - Exactly, so a lot of people get mad, like what do you mean, not supposed to be here, like you're talented, you did this, you did that. I'm like, okay,...
listen, listen, listen. I grew up in a white country, I grew up Greece, parents both illegal, struggling, and came from Greece to the United States, went first time to Milwaukee, I never heard about Milwaukee before. (audience laughing) - Did they tell you about the weather before you came? - They lied to me, they told me it was warm weather, so. (moderator laughing) - Three months,

Giannis

, three months, that's all we got out of him. - I really believe everything happens for a reason in life. God put you where he wants to put you; he never makes no mistakes, but at the end of the day right now I'm just trying to take a bunch of the opportunity. So I think that's what makes me be driven every day, and that's what keeps me humble also, because there's a lot of guys, a lot of people that get to a stage that they know they're supposed to be there, that's what they always dreamed about, and a lot of people helped them to be there, but a lot of people helped me also, but what keeps me humble, what keeps me driven every day is that I came from there, I'm here right now; there's a lot of kids that they were in the same position with me. And I went to a game, I went to Thanasis' game a few weeks ago, so I saw a kid mopping the floor, after every time out. And after the game, I was talking to my brother, I told my brother, I'm like, that was me right there. And then the kid came out, and I went and talked to the kid, and I'm like, yeah,...
I used to mop the floor. He looked at me, no way. No, I used to do it. I'm here now, so if I did it, you can do it, and I really believe in that, you just gotta help people and put people in the right direction, because people helped me, my parents helped, my brothers helped me, towards this direction, which with luck and everything, put me in this position, and some other kids go the different direction. They're not less talented; they just didn't have the luck that I had; and they didn't have the support that I had from people, from the community and all that. (audience applauding) - I know we gotta wrap up. I think

Chris

and

Kevin

,

Kevin

,

Chris

, can you give us some closing remarks, just thoughts on what we're hearing, and things that are on your mind as we leave? - No, I think, I mean,

Chris

hit it when we first started, just really an honor to be here. Mike, obviously, congratulations for yesterday. You've always given us players-- (audience applauding) In a world where, I mean, it transcends the basketball court, too, but where the commentary is, now the content, and there's 24 hour news cycle, and you have to create new storylines and pull stuff out of thin air that isn't true, you've always given us all a very fair shake, and you've just been great, that's why the Hoophall, I think, gave you the nod, so I appreciate that.

Giannis

, I hate that you have to guard me. (audience laughing) You just had a son, congratulations. I...
will now have a son about 10 years after the fact, so he's on his decline when he's coming into the league. No, but-- (audience laughing) I mean, listen, I'm, what, six years your senior, maybe six and a half, I think you're an inspiration for the entire league. The game has become so global now where you see

Giannis

is MVP from Greece, you have Luka is from S

love

nia and he's the Rookie of the Year, you have Pascal Siakam, he's from the Cameroon, he's the most improved player, that speaks volumes about where we're at as a game. Mr.

President

, you spoke to it, just the ability and the reach that we have we can scale up our youth programs, and our reach is so vast and so huge that if we do a PSA, it reaches the not only the tens of millions of kids, this game tomorrow, why we're here, is gonna be broadcast in how many countries, maybe we can, I mean, a lot, so hundreds of millions of people are gonna be I put you on the spot there, I'm sorry. I didn't-- - It's all right,

Kevin

. - You're good, you're not that good. (audience laughing) So many people are gonna just be inspired by you, so I feel like I found my life's work, and I'm gonna continue to pay it forward, but that wasn't the case until I was 28 or 29, and you're 25. I didn't know shit at 25, excuse me. We won an Olympic gold medal, we won. - Yeah, 2012. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I did '08, too. - But

Chris

,

Chris

, two, yeah, you did. I mean,...
there's still Tokyo. No, but

Chris

, I think we all have each and everyone of us up here all have different leadership qualities, but

Chris

is one of the greatest floor generals. And it's funny, this actually goes back to why I was we all have our like, you have your barbershop argument, you have your locker room argument, you're on the plane playing cards argument, so I'm arguing for CP because he's one of the best floor generals of all time. As far as being a leader he's on and off the court, you could say that one of the best that the game has ever seen so I tip my hat to you, and I like to, now especially just being more comfortable in my own skin I've ever been, just giving people, telling them that I admire them. So I admire both of you guys quite a bit even though you're my peers on the court, we play against each other, we've played with each other, won a gold medal together but, no, just an inspiration. You talk about 44 over here. I was actually the last basketball player to hand him the jersey in 2016, so. (audience applauding) I was so damn nervous to make the speech, too, I thought I fumbled over every damn word, but I was-- - It was good. - Yeah, you know, the photo-op was. But, no, I think I think I know when people look at you they see hope, and I think as far as in relation to what I'm talking about mental health, specifically anxiety, anxiety disorders, and depression, is really a crisis of hope, and it's the...
feeling of really a meaningless future. And I think you, speaking of inspiration, everybody in the world looks at you as a true inspiration, and you mentioned where you've come from, and your background, your history, and, I think, nothing unites us like the common enemy, and I feel really strongly that we all wanna be on the winning side of history and you've played a major part of it and that in all of our lives. So, no, I thank you for I was on my way to St. Barth's and so, Mr.

President

's team called and said, "Hey, will you come and do this?" I said, "Yeah, cancel all my plans, I'm gonna make "go ahead and make it to Chicago." So, I appreciate you, I really do. Having all of us, but specifically myself because selfishly this whole process has been very therapeutic to me but just, like I said, continuing to talk about it and pay it forward. It's stuff like this and having this platform and because of this game and because of you that this will make a big difference today, so thank you. (audience applauding) - I'll make it quick. 15 years in, you just don't get used to stuff, you know what I mean, this is not supposed to be our normal,

Giannis

, you know what I mean, like I'm vertically challenged, I'm six foot six one on a good day. - Really? - Be cool, be quiet, listen, listen, let me just tell y'all this real quick before y'all tell-- - Don't talk to me about vertically challenged-- - Let me...
just say this before y'all, 'cause he wants to say it so bad, I can see it. For his birthday, we had a pickup game, and he crossed over, and I sort of let him cross me up. Don't, no, no, no, no, listen, and you never hear the end of it. You was there, too, I know, Mike, whatever, but it happened, all right, but just this and this opportunity to be here with you guys, I mean, it's an honor and a privilege. I never thought '08 you was having a rally in Indiana, I don't even know if you remember. My whole team went, 2008, he was having a rally, and we went, he actually took a little shot at us while we was standing there talking about how much we get paid. (chuckling) But we all was there and who would've thought 2020 that we had a relationship that we have. I still, it's just something that you never get used to, 'cause I know he's the

president

, but he's the most down to earth person jump-talking person you will ever meet in your life, you know what I mean, but that's real. Mike, who I know since I was in college, been unbelievable.

Giannis

, I'm a fan, not during the game but I'm a fan of the NBA, and I'm a fan, I watch all the time. K.

Love

, man, we connected through so many different people. We had a chance to win a gold medal again, but these are experiences. When you talk about life, you know what I mean, you probably won't remember the last watch, or whatever, that you bought, but you'll remember the...
experiences that you have. And we talk about paying it forward, man, I'm you reminded me how old I am up here, but the coolest thing that when you talk about looking at somebody and seeing yourself, my dad spent his whole 401(k) on me and my brother playing travel basketball, so one of the first things we did with my family when I got to the NBA is we started an AU Program, a youth program: My mama booked all the flights, hotels, and everything; my brother oversees all the coaches; my dad does it. I got 12 kids that play in the NBA now that started in my AU Program. (audience applauding) You know what I mean, so my accomplishments mean nothing. So when I was at the rookie game last night, and I got a chance to see Josh Okogie, when I got a chance to see Collin Sexton, Wendell Carter, and all these guys who then came up through our AU program, Harry Giles, since he was like 12 playing on our AU Team, and now Harry got a battle to chew, that's not my problem, that's not my problem. But, once again, thanks so much for having me. (audience applauding) - Thank you. - I know there's a Saturday night session or two, three-point shooting, dunk contest that we all look forward to. So the All-Star game was here in what, '88, so this is my 32nd All-Star game, you talk about age,

Chris

, please. - I was three. (moderator laughing) - Thanks, reminded me. Thank you, I hope everybody keeps in mind the

president

's initial comments about listening to the stories and...
listening to what people are doing, and that being uplifting and, hopefully, these stories will go from here. I know there's some social media, the way that we disseminate now most effectively these stories and experiences and anecdotes. And I am certain that people will find out, will be hearing about it later tonight about

Giannis

said, or what

Chris

said, or what

Kevin

said, or what you, Mr.

President

, said, and I wanna leave the last word to you. Thank you for asking me to do this. I'm thrilled to be here. And I hope there's something else like this down the line that we can be involved in again. - Well, I wanna thank these outstanding gentlemen who are on the stage, I wanna thank those who attended, those who are interested in finding out more about how they can get involved, you can go to the

Obama

Foundation Website, correct? (audience laughing) I would hope so. (audience laughing) And I just wanna remind everybody's got a contribution to make, everybody's got a gift that they can give, and it may be small, it may be large, it may change over time, but if all of us are making that effort, then there's reason for hope and not hopelessness, and just listening to these gentlemen, I'm assuming it gives you hope just like it did me. All right. Thank you, everybody, God bless you. (audience applauding) (audience members chattering)