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PERFECT LACE APPLICATION MADE EASY!

PERFECT LACE APPLICATION MADE EASY!
hi welcome back to serger tip clips I get a lot of requests to show specialty feet and how to use them on the serger so today I'd like to show you the

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applicator foot it's a great little foot for precision stitching on

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when you're applying it with your serger it's not hard to use it's pretty simple to understand so we're going to go through the anatomy and I'll show that to you now here's my

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applicator foot for the baby like ovation so let's go through some of the different parts of this foot as you can see it has the indicator ridges as the other feet do and you see five of them so the Ovation is a combination overlock cover stitch machine so you can use both cover stitch and over lock with this but for today we're going to be using just over lock alone this is the little guide that's going to keep your

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perfect

ly aligned as you stitch it and I loosened up the screw so that you can see that it will slide right and left let me just hold it up so that I can see you can see it'll slide and there is just a little notch right on the top of the guide that is aligned with it on here and these are aligned with the needle we're going to be using our right overlock needle only so this is the only needle indicator words that I'll have to pay attention to but this notch is aligned with the guide on the foot and because I'm using just my right needle foot I'm going to move that not just ever so slightly...
perfect lace application made easy
to the right of the needle indicator Ridge and I'm going to tighten it up now on some machines you may have a little wheel to adjust your guide I'm the

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applicator foot or it may look slightly different but the principles are all the same so what we're going to do we're going to p

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a

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header and I'll show you that in just a second against the guide and then the fabric goes under it so let me just show you what you can do with this foot there are multiple stitches that you can use when applying

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for this example I'm showing you a three thread narrow that's with the right needle upper and lower loopers and I have red thread in the machine just for contrast so that the camera will pick it up and you can see it makes a nice neat even stitch along the

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and you can even see the very edge of the

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header that's how

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ly that

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applicator foot will align it for you but the reason I did this with a three thread narrow is that it makes a very flat seam allowance now if I didn't press this and I flipped it over you'd still see the seam allowance peeking through the

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but if I wanted to top stitch this to hold that seam allowance in p

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I would press it so the seam allowance is toward the body of the fabric itself and I have an example to where I have pressed that seam allowance toward the body of the fabric and that gives me that flat seam allowance so that I can go to my sewing machine and edge stitch it in...
perfect lace application made easy
p

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that seam allowance will never peek through and because that is a three thread narrow and a flat seam allowance it allows me to get

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edge stitching on that and again I my sewing machine specialty foot and edge stitching foot so you get very even stitching on that now if I were doing this on a transparent fabric here's a piece of silk organza again I did it in red simply so that you could see the stitching you might want to switch from a three thread narrow to a rolled hem and that has an even narrower seam allowance if I had done this in a very light pink with this fabric is or even a beige that matched the

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that stitching would completely disappear underneath the fabric but in a case like this with a rolled hem that would be a little more difficult to edge stitch on your sewing machine because a rolled hem has a more rounded contour to it and it might make your needle wobble back and forth and not get straight edge stitching on it so on something sheer where that seam allowance might show through a little tiny bit on the right side of the garment or your project I think I'd up for a rolled hem stitch so that's just the difference between that and there it is pressed up on the wrong side but again you can see the motif is

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ly aligned all across the sample let me talk about the

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header you heard me mention that a second ago this is the piece of

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that I'll be showing you and this part that looks almost like little tiny railroad...
perfect lace application made easy
tracks it's the

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header and that's what I'm going to align with my right needle and when I go to the machine I'll show you how I do that and the stitching is going to be caught right on that

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Heather and I have another little piece of

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it's antique that I took off a project and probably when I was taking it off I probably cut away the true header on it but again I don't think it really makes a lot of difference aesthetically if I stitch this on something what I would do on this is just align the needle right inside this finished edge on the top of the

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so let's go to the Machine and I will show you the setup I'm a time machine and I have my

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applicator foot snapped on but let's review our settings first for this one I am doing a three thread narrow so I have my right overlapped needle setup I have my stitch fingers disengaged I'm out of rolled hem setting but they're just on this a killer machine just means that the stitching is disengaged my stitch length is just a tip below two and I have my cutting width down to a fairly narrow one all of the tensions if you have a machine with tensions are on a normal setting because this is a stable woven fabric that I'll show you on so let me show you how I put the

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into the machine I like on a flat stitching surface to cut my legs a little bit longer than the length of the fabric and here's why when I go to insert it I want that

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header to be right up...
against this guide and I want to make sure that the

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is being fed absolutely straight from front to back so I put it under so that I have a little bit of the

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toward the back of the presser foot and then what I do is I lower my needle and make sure it's in the

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header where I want it to be and I've mentioned this in other tip clips before I like to use my needle like a third hand once I have that lowered in it anchors the

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to be where I want it to be then what I do is I have my presser foot up I'm going to put my fabric right under the whole presser foot against the feed dogs and I align it so that the knife is cutting off as much as I want it to cut off and let me just scoop this

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right back into where it needs to be so I'm going to be cutting off oh probably maybe a hair more than a quarter of an inch but this is just a sample it can be whatever you want it to be so I'll put my presser foot down and I just need the

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to ride against the little guy and keep my fabric straight and I'm ready to go the machine does all the hard work for me now you can see again absolutely

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alignment right down to the tiniest fraction it's really it's just great something I didn't mention before is that you want to stitch with the

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and the fabric right sides together on the

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like this it's very hard to tell which side is the right side and which is the wrong and kind of the rule of thumb is that if you're looking...
at it for 15 seconds and you can't decide which is the right to the wrong side on the

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it obviously doesn't make a big difference so but technically it should be right sides together so there it is with a 3 thread narrow and it would be the same principle with a rolled hem but that's on a flat piece of fabric now if I were stitching on the round say on the hem of a skirt what I need to do and this is just a little tube that I stitched I would want to cut what I call a starting gate and that starting gate would be the exact same measurement as the amount of fabric that I want to cut off from the edge so for stitching in the round it's the exact same set up where I'll get my

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in first and again I like to have a little extra length and you'll see why at the end get my needle down so that my

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is anchored here's my little starting gate so I'm going to get that and bring that right up to the edge of the knife and this is the beauty of having that fabric all squared away as far or having that the

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all squared away as far as anchoring it because as I'm manipulating the fabric under here I don't have to worry about whether the

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has been pulled out so there's my starting gate and let me come around and again I never like to start or stop on a seam allowance so I'm a few inches ahead of where the seam allowances and I'm just going to stitch around now we're coming down to the home stretch as you can see so what...
I like to do in this case is I'm going to trim off that little excess

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and there are a few different approaches to it and depending on the type of

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that you're using and where on your project it's going to be you can decide what's most suitable for your particular

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I'm aligning that again with the edge of that starting gate so that it's aligned with the beginning part of the

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and now at this point so that I don't cut off the edges of my starting overlocking I'm gonna just lock my knife because I don't need to cut off any more fabric but I just want to finish up my stitching in the round so once I see that it's all the way over and just overlap two or three stitches I raise my presser foot I pivot my fabric right out of the way about 90 degrees and just stitch off and it gives me a nice clean finish now I can put that I can take a double I'd needle or a bodkin and get that out from underneath and you can see a little bit of the overlap on that

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now if you did not want the raw edge of that showing you could always do some sort of a seam on it but my preferred method just for it to be very flat is to just take a couple of little hand stitches and hand tack those two raw edges together and it's very discreet and nobody really will see it and I think it gives you a nice smooth finish but if you're doing it flat and then you're going to do the of the vertical seam first you could do a seam right...
through your

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as well that's your choice there are lots of different approaches and none of them are necessarily right or wrong some of them are aesthetically better than others but as long as they all hold that's important to thanks for joining me today for the

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applicator serger tip clip and as always if you have any questions or suggestions for a future tip clip I'd love to hear from you and I'll keep them on my list if you'd like more information on it I did a two-part series four threads magazine the

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applicator foot and ruffling foot are included in issue 194 so be sure to check that out and 195 covers two more feet I'm not telling you which see you soon thanks