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No Work? Reinvent Yourself—Change is the only constant

Jun 02, 2021
i want to do the job i see something that needs to be done and i just do it why would i hire someone else to do this what else am i going to do and i remember telling you that you should be

work

ing in business and not your business thinking about how to grow and scale and you remember i do remember now and i think a lot of those the way i was raised growing up on a farm is like he resolved to have you made he just rolled up his sleeves and went out and did the job so when i started my practice i still had that guy mentality that things must be done.
no work reinvent yourself change is the only constant
I knew how to do them, so I just rolled up my sleeves. and you did and you always were you're always kind of like that guy who always wanted to give me advice and i think i was pretty stubborn back then still a little stubborn yeah and i just want to say for the record a younger guy plz younger guy cool younger guy keep going but when you said when i started my practice and you saw me doing all these little chores when you said you needed that you should outsource that or you should get somebody to help you for me I wasn't afraid of hard

work

so I didn't understand your principles I was also very worried that they would give me away something I always wanted to be close to my craft and I always love to design and hold things and work so for me It's like it didn't feel like a job, so I didn't feel like it was.
no work reinvent yourself change is the only constant

More Interesting Facts About,

no work reinvent yourself change is the only constant...

I needed to give away anything I wasn't that busy all the time anyway and I think to your point it's good I have the extra time and if I didn't have the extra time I would stay up later yeah that was always the case. it was my mindset so some people are correctly guessing how old d aaron is i'm not going to tell you but you can do the math now. I remember I also talked to you because you would work so hard and I would never accuse you of not working hard but maybe I would accuse you of not working as smart as you absolutely need to and I remember for periods of time you would just disappear and disappear and go surfing in Costa Rica and you embarked on these epic adventures meanwhile I worked hard in the factory if you Will I remember saying you see once?
no work reinvent yourself change is the only constant
It's like Aaron. I think you suffer from Peter Pan syndrome like you never want to grow up. You are still doing projects. but we're in our late 30's and I was telling you that you work on projects that I think 18 19 22 year olds would love to work on action sports oriented stuff and brands and I remember you worked on certain events which was nice like like a next game yes absolutely and the other part of this was not

only

reflected in the clients that you're working with and the things that you connected and resonated with you, but this idea that you would work and then disappear, you would just plan these trips and you would just disappear and and you liked the idea that you could pick up and go wherever you want in this more transitory transient life now and i told you that one day when you want to focus on your business your life will

change

,

change

for the better yeah so what is it your thought?
no work reinvent yourself change is the only constant
I think my thought process during those years, I think it was around 2000 to 2008, when I was a solo designer, solopreneur, solopreneur, sort of solving my practice out of my house my philosophy at the time was I have ability and i'm willing to work hard and i had a certain level of success early on i had certain clients and i'd look at the bank account i'd see the money coming in and it was it was pretty decent you know it's anywhere between fifty thousand and ninety thousand probably one of my best years, so there was the range and for me that was really good, so I had this philosophy, as long as I hit a certain number, at any time.
I had left over I'm going to experience things in life, so I would travel, so yeah, it was kind of a fixed mindset. I wasn't looking at the big picture. He was living in the now and he would. look at your career and i saw you working as hard as ever working and i was the antithesis of adam like chris why don't you enjoy life have you ever traveled out of the country and thought there will be a time for that and i thought you were crazy. I'm like I'm not going to be young for the rest of my life.
I want to experience these things while I can still move. That was my philosophy. As long as you know he was getting clients, the money was good. I was able to keep to myself, but before we're going to get into that, I want to dwell on this for a bit because the reason why some of you who are tuning in or watching this later will figure out very quickly why I brought Erin to the show because I think he can talk. and it relates to so many things you guys think about so here we are we were two contrasting personalities you come in we both came out of the world a little poor and made our way but you came from a very small town some financial struggles and some life familiar which was less than ideal but you get through all of those things well you made it work and but there was this idea that you just wanted to be here is where we differ this solopreneur doing the work

yourself

and doing it all

yourself

and feeling very proud that you could do it then say what's wrong with you why you don't want to enjoy your life and i can't see you're probably just trying hard salt mine cubicle type if you want li lian works in a cubicle and on the other hand i'm sitting here thinking this guy has so much potential he could do so many things but he just needs to learn how to grow at some point in his life and i'm

only

using him in the most important sense wide, like you are a mature person just thinking why your job doesn't evolve like my job didn't look the same as it did a few years ago, let alone when I was 20 years old, I needed to do a job that was going to be attractive to companies that they could afford to pay me what I wanted them to pay me.
I just want to have a bit of your mindset, how you saw yourself compared to me and this is your chance to follow me. if you want at that time yeah I think a lot of my motivation was I'm going to work hard and that's where my childhood comes from and growing up on a farm it's like that gets me through hard times it's like the solution is just work very hard and I didn't look very proactively to what's going to happen long term because I had a certain level of success early on branching out as a solo entrepreneur.
Things were very reactive when clients came in and how I adapted to those clients, but it wasn't until I ran into some difficulties where we maybe looked at who I was as a person, especially at that point in my life where you know I have almost 30 years I expected a certain level of success in comfort and you know having stability and financial stability in my relationships and I really started to find out that I didn't have much of this stuff mm-hmm and that's when there was that shitty moment and that kind of come to Jesus like maybe I need to grow up well let's talk about it so this is where I think we wanted to pivot and we can come back to you if you want to ask those questions on Facebook and on YouTube that we have two guys in the other room along with Erica Emmanuel and Sam two interns joining us here so I'll be monitoring your feedback and you guys let me know if you hear a really good question okay feel free if feel free to interrupt us let's talk about this point of a change in your life what happened here so i think if you were paying attention if you were alive during this time in 2008 basically the bottom of the universe opened up as far as to people in the financial market was committing suicide stocks like apple stock was at $18 a share everyone thought the whole economy would crash and hit a lot of businesses ours too so let's talk a little bit about 2018 on 2008 yeah i think my my my business and i really were on cruise control and things were good you know there was money in the bank and i was living the life i wanted to live i had a lifestyle i enjoyed and then i think about everything 2007, when the housing market exploded in the stock market, both steps were taken, I'm right and what happened is that the clients, the phone stopped ringing and that's when I saw that the bank account aria was starting to decrease how much was in the bank account right now you know i think she was always hovering between five and twenty thousand dollars okay but that was fine when the money kept coming in but then once the Phone stopped ringing, I had to re-evaluate what was going on.
I think a lot of my clients would keep working in-house now because their marketing budgets were so much tighter. they already have funding it was lovely indie at any time so there was absolutely nothing yeah money dried up everywhere and i think i remember their biggest clients in the action sports space and they were having problems financially too good yeah I think in the action sports industry I did a lot of lifestyle brand action sports and their sponsors stopped sponsoring the event so those events just disappeared. Another big customer I had at the time had a contract with Honda. motorcycles and the down payment is that they had a one year contract and they paid me monthly so it's like a salary for that stability they stopped having a job because then they adjusted their budget and kept everything at home and so that was that moment where I needed to figure out what to do next well this kind of thing doesn't happen overnight there is a slow progression or it can feel like it happened overnight but it felt like it happened overnight morning, it was like a client calls you and says Erin, it's been great working with you, but we can't do this anymore, there goes Honda, the action sports guys say we can't do the next event this year, all our sponsors they retired and little by little you start to see that 20,000 becomes 18 becomes 12 becomes 8 yeah and talk to me right we have to hit rock bottom for you it was pretty quick i knew i mean i probably started to see ilive beyond my means because i had a nice car mm-hmm and i was more concerned with status and what people thought of me so i had a certain lifestyle that i was used to living eating out dressing a certain way and when i couldn't afford to do those things and the money wasn't coming in that's when i'm like alright, what do i do now?
I actually delete my resume and look for another job and was very proud because I had some level of success with designing the farm and I built something to feel like I had to let it go and you know suck my pride and go to interviews again. I was very tough and actually did it. I had to with you. i rewrote my resume now i'm almost 30 and i was going to go to a couple of job interviews and never got the job. I'm like, wait, wait a minute like me. I thought my work was pretty good, but they weren't hiring.
Why do you think that was? I think they were all starving. they had to be very selective about who they cast because they probably also have limited resources and maybe I just wasn't a fit. I think also maybe my portfolio was very one dimensional, but that worked for me in terms of my business model is that I focused a lot on action sports, kind of a youth lifestyle, that's the type of clients to The ones I appealed, how did I make you feel so inferior? It actually made me think and kept me up late at night just wondering, well, what did I do wrong, you know, the fear of can I make my car payment? can i pay the rent? you me that was the moment i like reall I hit rock bottom.
It was not funny. It was scary. It's been hard to say okay it's been a good run it's been about eight years and it's been great and now I have to change and everything is changing and have you started to regret some of the decisions you made before that point because sometimes times when you are in that dark place you said yes why did i buy that expensive car? I don't know what it was. I just don't think I regret the decisions I made with my business. I look back as a learning experience. Well, I probably should have done something different.
I certainly believe that with a lot of people who live beyond my means mm-hmm have a nice car and live a certain way and at the end of the day, what does it all really mean? it's just that it's superficial and it took rock bottom to start looking at those things and reevaluating and evaluating who I was and did I need to change my mindset to right the ship because it was all like business, accounting, my relationships were like everything came to a head, did it cause friction in your relationship? It certainly didn't help, yes, because we broke up at the time.
I was also in a long relationship and I guess it probably wasn't a 15 year relationship right? So why didn't I commit to that person? So I think there was a lot of things I didn't want to grow mm-hmm so you know the whole Peter Pan syndrome affected everything if the label suits you. I know, I know you resented me even throwing that out. I never know what that meant when you mentioned it. I made it up, yes it iswell, Pan Peter Pan never grows up. out now would be a good time to put them away because we're at a pivot there's a reason Aaron is here I wanted him and I encouraged him to just open his heart and share some of the pain points there because what happens next I think that we can learn a lot now that we had a commercial break this is when I would cut a commercial break but we don't so we'll move on okay that's how we roll so I'm going to pull this light here and remember you did this.
I have my thoughts and opinion on this too but you started another business mm-hmm yeah because you let me set the stage and then you take it from there so here you are you can't get customers because you didn't actually create a sales pipeline . or the sales or marketing strategy and all the things you had done in the past are no longer applicable because there are too many buyers in too few sellers. Sorry let me just say there are too few buyers and too many job sellers out front and so you went out and tried to get a job you did the whole resume dog and pony show and move we couldn't get the job either so now it's like what it does one person and you got pushed into pretty tight corners right around the time you started a company called moogle a portable mp3 music player yeah that was tapping into a big trend the trend was custom vinyl art built around artists who have a following yeah , the way you may know, I think when I was at that place in my career, I had to make a decision.
Do I just bury my head? in the arena and you know if i failed or try to learn from my mistakes and do something with it and when the chances weren't knocking they say build a gate and because no one else called me that i felt like i needed to create my own chances i took a lot of the lessons I realized I learned a lot of design doing branding for my clients helping them build something watching their vision come to life so I'm good I need to take the lessons I have the skills I have the foundation n and do that for myself, so I was very passionate about music and collecting vinyl toys, you know, I think I probably got a lot from you because you also collect a lot of vinyl toys and I think I got that light of inspiration and created this thing called the Moog, oh and what was it my goal to bring a product to market.
He didn't know what he was doing. It was all just because of the seat of my pants. I literally designed something. I tried to figure out how to find suppliers and manufacturers. I knew I had to go to China because looking for local suppliers was too expensive and the price was not right. So how can I find suppliers in Asia? A lot of this stuff was incredibly reactive, but I had a purpose. like I need to create another type of source of income. I'm going to create my own business separate from the brand and that's what was mugo and that was probably a two year labor of love to get that thing off the ground mm-hmm and then kind of in the middle there's occasional ly like little small projects that could come up, but I was there all the time, everything was running out.
I remember, yes I remember, so sometimes a wise friend could come along and offer advice and you would ignore it because of our competitiveness. spirit mm-hmm and then sometimes life sends you another message knocking on your door and then it pulls the rug out from under you and you can't attribute these global forces at work if you want this whole high risk market just knocked background and something like that that's a consequence of your action things just happen but then it's in those moments that you learn that oh we didn't prepare your emergency kit for earthquakes now we have to do something about it and you tried something afterwards and where it is in this part of your journey is you start to make these kinds of foundational changes that lead you to where we're going to take this conversation at one point what happened can you remember what the triggers were? gers and how it changed your mindset because a lot of what we try to teach on the show is about mindset yeah I think one thing that I took from my childhood, I grew up on a farm and farming community, is that my dad always told us he taught the guy to feed the soil and not the plant and it was a very literal lesson that he was trying to teach us and what that meant for the crop to thrive is that you really need to focus on the soil and so he taught us how to fertilize the soil, how to do crop rotation so all these things were focused on a base and if you focus on the base then that crop will thrive and you will be sustainable if you lose focus on that base or the soil and this metaphor which is that the plant will eventually wither and die so when i was going through this transition i remembered that lesson and used it as a metaphor that i think what i have spent so much time focusing on was like myself and what you fight with others people with the importance of what they thought of me the type of car I drove the type of clothes I wore and I was more focused I guess on that plant and I didn't focus on the base so I changed I needed a change in my way of thinking to think in a belief system that is more long-term and more fundamental, so when developing something like creating my own product, it's something that I can put a lot of work into creating it, but that would have long-term effects. in terms of sales and the lessons I've learned from that I can turn that into other opportunities and I think that's what really happened when I started doing that is other opportunities came through this experience opportunities that I don't even foresee but then I take advantage of. those opportunities and I think that's when things started to happen.
The big change was along with muga because I had to finance that and I had to survive it. I needed to decide how I'm going to gram row my business if that's what I wanted to do and I remembered what you always told me is I think there was someone you met there was a kid you met at a portfolio review and you called me and said, hey there's this guy he's you know he's cool I liked his energy call him try him out as an intern just give him one day a week and you know at that point it's like he has nothing to lose so really i heard for you that time the only time the only time or maybe the first time okay the first time is the first time and so i called him and he came and i interviewed him and his portfolio was, you know, his average but i liked his energy and so I said, okay, I'm going to take this leap of faith, I don't know how I'm going to pay for this kid, you know it was $10 an hour, so I said okay, what if I give you lunch every day?
Sounds attractive? He said he was as hungry as I was so I hired him and said let's go in let's try two days a week and he didn't have a vehicle and he was driving a bus it took him two to two and a half hours just to get to my house so that I knew he was also really passionate and hungry so what I started to see is this What I thought was maybe this kid can help me with little chores and errands is what he did he really started a fire and restored. It brought the passion back into the energy for my craft as a designer because he would come in and give him tasks and teach him certain things and I could see the look on his face when I showed him these things and it kind of fueled my fire and then amazingly what I didn't expect it's he taught me a lot of things because i got too proud i thought i knew everything i thought i knew everything but he taught me a lot of things and that's when i had a big turning point in my career in my life and looking at myself like you know what about maybe i don't know everything maybe i need to look at this again i look at my career when i was a solopreneur and i look at us i was really a little plant in a little pot i was this guy in my apartment working in this little room i wake up and i go into the room and i do my work i was a plant in a small pot and what i had to do was focus on that base and grow that base so i needed a bigger pot to be able to p let my roots grow, so I bought another computer.
I got another workstation. I got the intern and we started doing things and things started happening. I don't know what it was but I knew something was different mmm ok let's leave that thought for a second here. I want to queue you Manuel and Sam and Erica if you guys have any questions please prepare your questions. I just want to read some comments from the live chat. People say that this is a common crude. 30 minutes so thanks for saying people say this is awesome say hello teach and learn so the farm design is amazing check it out awesome so get some good energy in I want to share that with you so you can feel some of the feedback from the audience.
I have tons of thoughts and ideas and questions to dive into but I'm going to send it to the new dream team new dream team do you have any questions or comments on this we have a question from the lolis gallery is asking how a solopreneur runs their company of hair during a recession I think you're listening right now yeah I think you're hearing exactly this story about how solopreneur runs his company during a recession and we're going to talk a little bit more about that so we're going to be good that's it a good question, anything else, you guys can ask your own question. you guys as you listen to the story you are both graphic designers you manuel raise your hand so people know who you are so manuel is from italy from milan yeah ok its ironic you are here and i will go to Milan in a cou A few weeks where you came from and then I'm really waiting for you.
I'm sorry, so Sam Sam is from the Art Center. Correct. Your sudden graphic design. Until now, guys, since you're listening, Aaron, just pour your heart out here, just on the table on the floor, you've got something for us, Erika. I hear you smiling and laughing in the background. Focusing on Edit, okay, it's really cool to hear a story of how someone got started and the troubles they went through and how they figured out their mindset and I look forward to more even though half my attention is mostly online. i hear you smile a lot forgivable yeah at key moments when i do my little jokes and insert the jabs so i know you're paying attention anyway people wonder what happened to aaron and molly if they're gone forever and yes they're gone forever have been Sent to another country.
No, they're in the other room working very hard. Guys, just relax. We are bringing in many different types of people with different energies for the topics that are relevant to them and what they are passionate about. so let's talk about this a little bit, so before we break away for a moment from the story, you're in this dark place, you don't know what to do, so you end up bringing someone to help you. and I have to imagine because I think we've had these conversations before and this will touch on a lot of what our audience is going to feel, so when you don't succeed you feel good who am I to go up against people and mentor like I don't even I was worthy of doing that and I'm barely making it as it is financially how can I afford to bring someone else what are they going to do for me?
I ain't got no job to do what the heck they gonna do alright is a sound about fair is fair enough alright no so despite all that you finally finally let some words of wisdom drip into your skull thick and you actually brought a child bringing the child yes and it was very generous yes actually because a lot of people do unpaid internships for you even to say look I'll pay you by the hour and then I'll buy your lunch because you're a nice guy so that if you have a loaf of bread i think you're the type of person who doesn't cut half and give it to your clerk you cut what you think the clerk needs and eat the leftover crumbs so congratulations you're good you're a good man charlie brown you're fine so you bring a guy and you start learning to delegate you learn to collaborate you learn to manage absolutely and most importantly you're teaching and sharing what you know and this is what teachers always say they say this and it's a cliché if it's totally true you learn more from the student than they will ever learn from you and i want to explain that a bit but i don't want to explain it i want you to do it like what do you mean when you say like you don't Did you realize that you would learn so much by having someone you are going to teach?
I think it's interesting to teach someone things you know first of all I didn't really think I knew much I think I had certain skill levels but I'm saying if you've been paying attention in life you should have you should learn something and so having someone there where you can brainstorm and share information you realize how much you really know and then start a conversation in that conversation you stimulate and challenge each other and I think that's one of the challenges of working it's just who's there to challenge yourself it's like you have that in that kind of inner voice that that can do it for you so having an intern or a student there that can challenge you in your thoughts that can bring new dialogue and information athe table I think that's what really started where I started to grow as a person m m-hmm and it made me want to learn more so I could share more mm-hmm and so we started this collaboration between the two of us I think I felt like I was becoming a better and more knowledgeable person and i could that he was always on time every day the front door ready to go on to the next task and that further ignited the fuel like ok where do i take this whats the next step , so I brought in another intern because the work started to increase? so I brought someone else at the time, I had moved and had a house, so we're going to talk, we're going to talk about the transition right now, but I think it's important because I had a garage. so i moved out of this apartment with the guest bedroom and now i had a house with a garage in a yard and i put more computers so i'm fine i felt comfortable taking that person in their little baby steps scaffolding type progressions my efforts in trying to build for something greater ng I didn't want to jump in head first.
I was taking small baby steps but at least moving forward with the goal that I need to do something where I can be sustainable and something that I can have to grow my business and in my career so I hired another employee as it started as an intern she was fantastic so i offered her the job after a few months yeah but we were in the garage and it was hard i was surprised i took her job because she's like this person who just graduated from school who I thought you had amazing talent, why would you want to come work in my garage? then he saw something I think of me maybe I think he saw something in my vision I'm like he wanted to grow the business so he needed to get a bigger boat so I took another leap of faith and got some office space in Old Town Pasadena, so I got really scared because now I have more expenses, more overhead, I had to pay rent. in utilities and more computers and the salt pan and that's pushing me out of my comfort zone is really what allowed me to start growing and maturing as an individual and maturing as a business owner mm-hmm okay let's customize the slides this is where Aaron's office is now on the strip in Old Town Pasadena, it was more like Colorado, it's right above the van shoe store, ban shoes and yeah and something else, that second floor there and lush, you can see it on the second floor with orange lights and I'm going to show you now a little bit about their office space and it's been through some expansion they knocked down some walls and moved in they opened their office and soon I think they'll probably outgrow that office as well that's a probability. that boat is probably I'm outgrowing that boat and then I probably need to get a bigger boat so yeah it needs to keep growing so here you can see Aaron with his dog Shelley Shelby Shelby and some of his staff okay and now let's look at some of your work yeah i know the internet is really smart so all of our fans were probably already crawling your site behan or on your website your website proper but let's take a look at some of the jobs, so now he's into food and drink. you're marking some really amazing restaurants and just really fun dream projects if you're going to do things from what is this craft cider and to Kalifa cold brew Kalifa calathea calif yeah thanks and then make coffee packaging for static mm-hmm and some trendy stuff too, you'll start to notice that I've gone from the youthful lifestyle to a portfolio that can attract the clientele that could probably pay as I can pay my staff and therefore to do that to go out out of my comfort zone of doing what i knew i needed, we needed to create a portfolio that could attract the clients that we wanted mm-hmm and i feel like i've heard that before, no yeah i can't put my finger on it and i think i came to you p with that yeah you're probably fine move on but I think a lot of your audience is like how do you get to the next level how do you attract a certain customer heck and I learned this from students they would ask me to do There were a lot of portfolio reviews at my alma mater at Cal State Northridge and AIGA and I always received the student portfolio and it would be where they would show homework work and projects they were probably most proud of or something they actually did at the real life that actually got printed but often those projects weren't that great it's like I designed this logo on this brochure for a bank for example and I'm seeing that the design isn't that great but they think it's the best piece in his portfolio because it was actually printed or because there was a real client so I learned from that that you know I don't think you have to show something you actually did I'd rather you show me something that exemplifies his capabilities and his design skills, so if that means you have to do something on your own or if you're in class and the teacher gives you a project, do the project, but then go to the next step and expand on that project. to in that system for his portfolio so from that lesson because I didn't want to look at projects that didn't appeal to me so when I started a kind of farm 2.0 when I have employees like we needed to attract a new clientele so we wonder what what kind of customers we want to attract and we were interested in maybe doing some kind of beverage company we liked coffee and we like restaurants so I tasked this with my employees ok let's think of a hypothetical project and start building something so we can actually put together a project brief we act like we're the client so we needed to have parameters so it wasn't the Wild West and we just ran all over the place we needed to have parameters and we design stuff we make fun of it , we filmed h I'm all for a portfolio and I would put it there, but we put it to the test, we put it on our website and then people started calling because they liked it. had something, a beverage project and then they had a beverage project themselves and so we started getting clients based on the work we were doing there so we weren't waiting for clients to come to us we were like okay we need to put something in there, you know, put a little bait in the water for them to bite so we can bring him in, we have to create something hmm, a good example is us, we, I had the opportunity for a restaurant branding project, honestly, no I remember how the guy found out he was going to do a pizzeria and that was extremely exciting it would be our first restaurant project he ever got into and that's when we first opened his office in Pasadena we didn't have a lot of furniture we didn't have anything on the walls it's like if i was like oh my gosh we have to look professional so they were actually printing things out and putting them up on the wall like we were really really busy he went into the office and we pretended we were really busy and did the pony and dog show and he was sure we got the project and he didn't call us I went back and thought this was our chance to get into the restaurant business but since we didn't get that project, I'm good guys, we need to create this hypothetical restaurant project and we took it as an opportunity and put that on the internet and then we started getting calls to do restaurant projects, but I think that only works if you do a good job, It can't be a mediocre job, otherwise you'll probably get mediocre clients, I don't think anyone wants me to. period of mediocre work even mediocre clients don't want mediocre work lemme lemme ask you a couple of questions to get you worried about doing those artwork trying to create the look and facade that you're in the studio and then don't don't get to work for other reasons that you don't think you got the job I think there wasn't a certain polish I was still refining our game in terms of how we sell our skills, who we are, we're still trying to define who we were so I think they didn't we necessarily had confidence in our ability, we probably didn't have that body of work to lean on yet, so I think there were two aspects: did they have confidence in our ability to do something and you have something? to support that, you can see that you like case studies.
Yeah, I'm going to mention a couple of things because I want to fill in some of the gaps for the audience. I remember talking to you about this and I think I'm glad you finally made those changes but I remember looking at the portfolio so now you have half foot in this other world called the adult world and half on the other foot in the world of youth action sports lifestyle brand and I think even at this point because you and I have had so many conversations especially when you were still living in Santa Monica, we would go out for lunch first once a week and then twice a week and it seemed like we would have lunch every day and i would meet you basically just chat i was trying to help a friend level up his business game which is something that made me feel really good but I remember seeing some really beautiful mature typography and work for real estate clients and some beautiful identity design work that was in conflict with this one if you guys remember going back to surf brands, and his kind of things he was doing were diametrically opposite and looking and toning so i don't know if i didn't express it clearly to you at the time you have to make up your mind because it's kind of schizophrenic people show up on his site they're going to see something or they are going to wonder which designer I am going to choose.
I'm not going to look for the most sophisticated mature person who can understand big business or who doesn't want that. You didn't have a youthful, edgy energy and I think at the time you weren't ready to let it go but you finally did and started changing portfolios so a recurring theme here but I'll try my best to articulate is your ability to look into the moment and make some really hard decisions that seem to go against every fiber of your being we track it down to I just want to do the work I have great pride and ownership I think it's good it's ethical for me to do the work and then let it go let that go and transformed it then take on more employees and then make a big commitment anyone who's been out there who's had to sign the lease is like a three year lease you're making a commitment a promise of paying rent to someone else that you're not sure you can do for the next three years that's a big moment of control and you're doing all these things that you call little years scaffolding steps but really the giant commitments where you have to overcome and also let go of something from the past to make room for the future yes and you did all that and congratulations it took you a while i always say you would be 10 times more successful if You'll just move on a little faster but you're super successful now I'm going to show you a little more of your work but there's something else I want to talk about here and you've mentioned it a couple of times I feel like I need to point it out when Hugh Barton was here the psychotherapist, talked about the difference between self-confidence and self-esteem.
He had never heard this explained this way before and I hope I don't trash this part. how you feel about yourself and your work when no one is around self esteem is what you feel when there are other people around and i think they are the same because you really can't be confident if you don't have self esteem what is the reason ? that's because you mentioned twice that you brought in this superstar designer and you weren't sure if If she would want to work with you because you're working in her garage, so I never suffered for it because I always thought that I have a lot to share and the work is going to be really well don't worry about the IKEA tables in the cardboard box we work with and then that came back when you had clients come in and you were like, oh let's make sure we look a certain way when I want to spend all my energy working in the inner workings. in the mindset, the self-esteem, the self-confidence to be able to learn how to talk to people because, in theory, when all of that goes away when you catch fire or something happens, you still have these things inside and that's the important thing but the last thing you you mentioned, which is something we refer to as closing the gap.
Many creative people know their full potential and keep telling themselves that if a client ever gave me the chance, I would do this amazing job. what they are doing is they are putting the b urden of work and the fey jump the risk in the hands of the clients you told yourself very wisely we want to do this kind of work realistically looking at our own work we are not going to get for this to work based on our portfolio so we need to make time energy and you pooled the resources to do this kind of work and you for doing what you did almost felt instant results you put the projects they talked about , they were shared on all these sites and these blogs and then all this attention wasfor you, yes. and it was wonderful so you were rewarded for making efforts to show people the world the potential that you believed in yourself but hadn't shown before and that's how you get by and get this job so guys who are scratching their heads head.
And thinking about this right now, how do I make that transition from being a poor bankrupt person but not a broke person just a bankrupt person and how do I make that transition? all of t The conversation we're having right now means you need to know your craft, that's the beginning part, but that's not the end, it's just the beginning, okay, any other questions and I'll show you more of your work. find out as life lessons the things you're taking away from this ok any other kind of questions you people are saying this is like the best live stream ever it's like it's a little bit hyperbolic but I'll take it, okay, someone is putting it in quotes. air quotes Gianfranco is saying that adult design equals money.
I don't know, it's okay, you're doing well, distant men. defined budgets for your service or are you looking to work with clients to organically develop a budget for your service do you understand the question if I do it right you know I was when you're hungry you'll take on any client so when you're in development and I'm trying to build that foundation, you'll take pretty much any client as long as they're willing to pay you for your trade so as you evolve and get more polished I think the rules change a bit and I think luckily for my trade farm layout we've evolved quite a bit in a very short period of time so the rules that I look for and at work I call these three P's guy there are three rules that I want to try to stick to and me to figure out if that's the right project for us and the three P's They are our earnings portfolio and the people, so the portfolio is what I look at when someone calls me, if it's going to be a project that I'm very excited about, a project that I'm very excited about.
I enjoy something I want to put in my wallet. I want to be proud that the other is the benefit. I want to assess if the client is qualified, if they're on a budget, so I dig in and I know you ask this question sometimes. sleepless when you make a proposal and the third party is people who let's say 85% of their problems come from 15% of their customers essential 80/20 is the Preta principle but yeah so I kinda sidestep it yeah yeah so I've worked with a lot of what I consider to be bad clients and it just takes your soul out when you're working with certain people who don't respect you or your trade or vice versa so I think it's very important when you're in a business relationship make it a healthy relationship so my rule of thumb is that I need to have at least two of the ones that work for me you can't have just one and I think the Unicorn is if you can have all three so when evaluating the type of job for the that we want to work or the type of people so I don't necessarily have to make money every time I can take a job if the people that I respect and it's fun to work with and it's a portfolio piece that's really exciting because I know that is a investment that's going to get the next job, but you can do any combination, but for me it's got to be at least two of those three, yes, okay, two of three, other questions, Emanuel Sam, yes, okay, of Away, how do you produce a good job when you're in a hurry because you're very short on cash? yes, how is work produced?
I don't believe in working fast. I think as the creative director guiding my design staff. I never say that they work faster. Hurry up because I think Vinnie will get a lesser job. They're just going to like it. there's that tension and they're trying to create something that I think is highly productive and therefore trying to get something done in a short amount of time. I think part of it is that you have to be realistic with the project in the timeframes that you want. assume I think it would be a disservice to your client if you take on a project where you can't meet deadlines and if you can't do it to a certain standard and quality that you believe in and then you just shouldn't take it, you have to be able to walking away from a project because ultimately you're going to tarnish that relationship and they're not coming back.
I believe in building relationships so that the customer keeps coming back. Personally, I'm not a salesperson, so I don't do traditional sales cold calls. I don't do a lot of bounce marketing because it's just not my style so when I get a chance to work with the client I want to make sure I do my best because I want to be able to continue that relationship work you guys have a follow up question for him . I'm trying to monitor Facebook and YouTube too. doing any project you've done well oh well that's a great question I'm trying to do it I think often the projects I regret are because I didn't align with or don't have the same values ​​or principles as my client, so I think it's not necessarily whether I made money or I didn't make money is or if it's a portfolio piece or not I think the projects I regret the most are aligning with someone who didn't respect our craft or I didn't respect their vision, so I try to avoid those relationships, but sometimes you don't.
I don't know until you get into that relationship, so it's a challenge and sometimes you have to be willing to accept the fact that it might not be a good relationship and just say you know I just don't think it's a good fit. I think I wish you the best of luck and you just part ways but the projects you regret are I think I'll continue to find those and but I always try my best to curb that but it's challenging so what? how do you deal with those projects where you realize maybe we shouldn't have taken this, but you did and then you have to move on?
I rarely dislike leaving people in the lurch I think there's something about my personality so I don't usually walk k away from a challenging situation I think if it's the client and it's a tumultuous relationship where there's tension and we don't agree Okay, so I'm just going to have that conversation with them that you know, I think maybe there's someone better for you and then we've come up with some kind of exit strategy. I think otherwise if we continue this tumultuous relationship, then I don't think we'll be able to produce our best work, the experience. it will be tarnished and in the end neither party will be happy, so why go through such a lengthy process?
I think it's better to be open and transparent and say that I think we are not the best fit. down some stuff here i say yes there was a youtube question asking if that fake restaurant project is still available on their site somewhere and what's it called it's not on our website anymore but it lives on the internet because one of the best things it's that there is an inflation uential called the dye line mm-hmm there are other blogs out there and when we launch projects and with technology and social media people pick it up if it's worth mentioning and share that information to keep the project alive, I think one that I was referring to is called old boy blues mm-hmm I'll find it yeah old boy blues and the designer that worked on that she was actually an intern at my company she's now my art director and she's been with me for five years. so this project was kind of a labor of love and we were trying to feel it and it was all mockups it was hypothetical but that gave us our first restaurant project and today we do a lot of work in a restaurant and I think on any given day We're probably working on two or three restaurant projects.
I can't find your project here, but I'll try the old blues. Let me do the design, see what I come up with. You can keep talking about why. I find this I think talking about how technology can help boost marketing for yourself is even the mugo project we were referring to earlier it was picked up by the dye line I didn't expect this it was picked up because I had posted something on my website and the line de tinte picked it up I uploaded it and published it and then I started getting all these calls and one of the calls I got was from DreamWorks DreamWorks contacted me and they said they wanted to do a license partnership agreement with me at mugo and this is all because I posted something on there I tried to create an opportunity that I didn't know I was going to take but I knew I needed to get something out there and create my own opportunities and then I was able to get Moo into Walmart and urban outfitters in retail but I learned a lot from it .
I'm not doing Moo go anymore, but I think that opportunity taught me a lot of lessons about the business side of design and took away a lot less from the creative side, so when I go to client meetings I can talk about the likability side I learned. through muga, like what did the user do to go to market strategy, you know what your cost is, what your distribution channels are, you know you ask these questions that I would have never been informed I knew how to do because I was a designer, I was more talking about the right font and colors, but I think if you talk about business on a strategic level and bring value to the relationship, then that's when they're more intrigued and see you as a valued partner rather than just a designer and that's when my business really started to grow like when i changed the dialog from design to business strategy and i think that's a big part of why my business took another step ok i'm going to take a note for to follow this up but we found old boy blue yeah it's right here on the screen because he was writing old boy and he knows ol boy blues so this is what it looks like. copy-ups and stuff like that because some people on our show told him you're going to be on the show and they said ask him how he does such a great job with these demos and bands.
Is there any advice you can share? with us how much work is put into these photographs that we're looking at here well we're not photographers so we just do the best we can just try to figure it out and I think that's the key to all this stuff is just that it you'll figure it out, just go into it, you don't have to, you don't have to know the outcome, you just have to be willing to take the first step, so we could take, for example, this image here, yeah, this is a stock photo The one where you composited the thing on the brick wall, no, actually there was this is one of the alleys behind one of our offices in Pasadena and we took this with an SLR camera and then photoshopped the graphics on the brick wall there who's the best guy to carry the box and the bike was an employee at the time oh yeah so he modeled for us ok and he had a strong old besson style ok what restaurant are we photographing? we actually went to a burger joint and said we were doing a student project would you mind if we took some pictures and they said no problem so we ordered some food and took some snapshots yeah i remember at the time you hardly knew how to do it? to use the camera too they asked me well don't lose the kid ok but now you knew enough about how to take a photo that is well lit and understand the lighting and they are the key parts for you to make They are great mockups for us, it's very much about storytelling so it's like we wanted to tell the story, the story of the brand, put it in context and that's what a circuit was, there could be a date in there around 2012, maybe 13 something like that, that's all. ok and then i want to see your portfolio no With a layout on the farm in the butts you get a lot of hints from behan s - we get it a lot you get it a lot so i want to talk about this for a brief moment because i've been harping on this for our audience and they're like a Chris a king getting jobs and I told them they're in bands and what they look like and how much effort and energy they put into that stuff so I'm going to step on this one since it's the newest for sure I decided it works here let's take a look at it go ahead and tell us about this what are you doing here this is a project we just launched yesterday it's called bivouac it's a cider company in san diego california they came to us maybe a year and a half ago because they saw some logos we put on behance which was also just a hypothetical project what was the oxidized coffee the rest of the coffee yeah so we let them know so they would find us on B.
That's why they contacted us and we started but what they make.cider they wanted to make canned cider they wanted to have a restaurant or kind of a watering hole for their customers to be consumers and this is a year and a half process so when we put this together it's a combination of telling a story telling a brand story and touch on a lot of the different facets of the brand, we try to look at micro and macro stories, a lot of what you see here are those cans and boxes, those are mockups, so if we do a 3D model or use stock photography sites, i think we got them from the yellow pictures chill they do all these types of mockups really cool with lighting so we bought those from there and a lot of these others like when I look at stock photography like you here that you have here with the type that holds thebeer bottle to find the right stock photography that doesn't look like stock photography that also aligns with the brand vision, so it's not just like taking a picture and leaving it there It's like you really have to heal and think about how that story works.
Is it the right demographic? Do they have the right lighting and tonality? We love using stock c.com. don't feel stock, we use shutterstock.com too, but Shutterstock is generally good for more types of images that look pedestrian, look like stock, but it's a combination of making fun of things, shooting things even in the studio, shooting them outside the studio well here is what i want to do i don't break this down and i'll prep you for this in case you don't want to but i'll ask you a little bit about the business part of this but it's still not right let's talk about these cans it's a CG computer generator is photographed can you tell me what you think?
I think it's CG how can you tell because I know you don't have a photograph? re correct it's a mockup it's a mockup but I think it's beautiful l I think some of the best renditions of the brand are mockups. I don't think it has to be that way if the qualities do. I do not care. I think it looks great. take pictures and get a can sweating like this not so easy to do and i look at gradations a lot would you use that yellow yellow pictures yellow pictures for this how much does it cost you to buy the model for this and put put your tag on it dollar fifty $250 ok one dollar fifty dollar fifty dollar fifty so this look thanks for sharing this now i just want to take a moment and say this to you guys out there Aaron might have amassed these resources that might is you guys figure it out because if you're going to go looking for 3d models, you might spend a little bit of trial and error to find the right one so i really appreciate you saying that and i haven't heard of stock C before and we'll talk a bit more about that so you're sharing your resources basically is saying you guys go out there and make better compositions and i'm not going to feel competition from you guys right now let's stay here why did you put this kind of landscape hilly behind? branding agency so we're trying to bring in clients and build branding systems for them so it's not just a logo it's not just a website we like to build systems to build a branding system that's effective and You can connect and communicate with your audience. it needs to have a lot of different facets so there's a lot of tertiary, secondary and tertiary artifacts as we like to call them so the main artifact could be a logo and then if you scroll down a bit more you know that I will have secondary markings colors textures let me let me drive this a little safe tell me about the mountain but where did you make this label?
Is this for an advertisement or did you just add this for the presentation? e this, yeah, yeah, it was actually born from one of the mood boards we created I think, and we actually used that texture, if you sort it, it's kind of an ethereal misty background to capture the essence of this adventure and style of outdoor life yeah it's just a cold mountain and yeah I want my drinks piping cold yeah that's ok this restaurant photo is this their actual place of business this is a rational place to look literally open two days ago I see so this is hot off the press yeah where? it's this San Diego so you drove to San Diego we took this photo that they gave us and we're actually going to go there and take it with consumers consumers in space because I think it brings a different dynamic so even though I posted it now , we will

constant

ly update it to make it better and better, so we want to reshoot it and bring a different energy to us by having people in it.
Why is it important that you

constant

ly improve and revisit these presentations? tions you know bands because I know there are customers out there our cost to look at not just today you know next month a year from now so why don't we have the chance this is dynamic information it's not static like once you put it up there no you have to do that it's not permanent not like we're printing something and you have to burn it and reprint it it's very easy to fill it out again and on this form and because clients in the future will see it they're going to want and they're going to see those details and the nuances , so we're always trying to improve our craft, yeah constantly improving our craft, okay I want to tell you this guys, there's this concept of Jim, books and seven strategies. for wealth and happiness talk about miners and greats what you don't want to do is mix these two things you don't want to put in less effort for a bigger result or goal and you also don't want to put in a lot of effort for a lesser goal when you're talking g about your lead generation source basically all your sales and marketing in terms of inbound comes from banan's so it behooves you to do the best job and i've seen you do this and assign teams to do it it could be days if you don't weeks working on layout, typography, color palette, wording, order and proofing with photography and that's why your work stands out there are a hundred thousand maybe a couple million people on behan s -- well, why is it always the best job? rises to the top it's because they put time and energy into it and you need to do the same I want to come back and it's getting close to us breaking for the show here and I'm sure our live stream audience prizes in one to ten but it will end at some point so I want to dissect this very quickly just give me shorter answers as the slides I want to talk about is a deep dive into your portfolio your sales and marketing technique because of the work that we do i'm seeing here cuddle and our adventure did you guys write yes so there's a little typo treatment voice and you can use that i saw it on the can and again it's pictured here i'm assuming it's a stock state ok and then this it's another 3d mockup yes again yellow images mm-hmm very good look at that corrugated cardboard there guys it looks very classy I say because when I look at the portfolios and I can tell it's a mockup I say it's revealing the man behind the curtain , I want to try and create something that you can't tell, like who is real or not, that's the level of detail we're trying to get, it's like how the light hits it, how the shadows reflect all those little nuances if you can make it where it doesn't you reveal the man behind the curtain then i think its ok or then we will post it if they give you the 3d model if you give them the artwork and they render it actually its great because if you subscribe to a premium version in image It's yellow com, you can have them do a 3D rendering for you, just give them the drawings and I think in two or four weeks they'll give you something, but then they'll use it as they will. sell that model as a standard model because they are just trying to create content too so for a small fee of $300 a year they will actually do custom renders for you what is the limitation and how many can you do?
I think it's just an angle but I thought I mean in a year you paid 300 bucks a year unlimited Wow yeah hey guys if they hired a CG guy before this they'll charge over 300 this I think I think they're in Russia whatever okay so if you guys are in the 3d mockup rendering business now you're out of business okay let's stay here the winds have changed some you wrote the pen what same Misty Mountains these roller coasters are these mockups it's a mockup and you can tell we even put a water stain on the actual shadows of the roller coaster and composited all of that along with the background photo composition yeah it's all a composite on this whole project here I'd say we probably put in about a hundred hours to make fun of set sicknesses maybe two people working on it for over a week mm-hmm that's how important it is to us because I know the investment of that time and effort.
I have to pay my employees to do this so it's an investment and we know this will be Get the next project now. I'm going to say something that is both a compliment and an insult to you. Are you ready. I tell my team, guys, check out these mockups. This is the gold standard for my team. We could do better than this because we are better than them, aren't we? You're telling me we're not as good as they are, so I'm throwing it out so you guys, my team, can't do better mockups and designs on this.
You're not worth that much to me I don't see it that way but you know insults Insults are better than this I think anyone can be better than this and I know it and with that yes, it's as if we were all, we also know that we can improve in this game too and so a year from now we expect our portfolio and mockups to be better than they are today, so never sell it on its laurels. I mean his mockup game is tight so he's already in that sort of upper echelon are these your shoes that's what yeah we've also composited because the shirt the photo wasn't great so we composited things together, a lot of color correction, shadows, reflections, beer stains or water stains, so this is so you know when, when. let's say they're a brand agency they really are because they're writing copy there they're working on a lot more touch points than just the brand itself or just a package they're trying to create all sorts of visual reflection of what it's about this branding well i think you did a great job explaining a whole lot of this of course this is what we see on a lot of sites and he would like to do these multiple logos he calls them brand artifacts ok that's what he likes to do to your clients this is a stock photo I'm pretty sure you guys throw jumps or whatever you're doing right okay great great job man and I want to say this to both the designers and the clients who are potentially watching this episode - there's a lot of really great footage. there may be too many and the problem is the ability to hone in and find the right image so the image may not cost you much in terms of payment like buying a shutter stock image or stock see if its really pennies compared to what it would cost to commission someone for what you are paying for is someone with a keen eye who can pick these things out and scan hundreds if not thousands of images to find the right one for you and that is a skill and worth paying for because they have taken an asset that's a dollar and they've turned it into a hundred thousand dollar image because they've selected the right one I could have color corrected and tweaked a few things will absolutely become something those details healing is so important it's like if you could tell pretty quickly, if it's us, a photography graphic or a mockup, we try to increase that perception of what it is and to be able to tell a story so that you focus It's in history and I think if you do it really well I think that's that's what we're trying to achieve okay I want to talk a little bit about business now can we talk a little bit about business okay how much do you They pay for that project, the baby walk, yeah, it was interesting because you actually had stock options? in business we're going good did you know he's actually part owner but very small very very small but if this is sold to Budweiser you know you combine it in an hour but rather than in terms of cash I think it was 45,000 whoa 45,000 g Okay for you so in three payments spread over a year and a half but yeah great and when you told the client and I want to talk about some of the mindset stuff here put this in $ 45,000, we always have this kind of fear how is it is too much is too little tell me about your mindset when you are working on estimating this matter ok so the person who contacted us was actually already engaged with another agency in San Diego, an agency that when I was in school over 20 years ago that I admired I would buy books because their logos were on them and they weren't they were they were amazing they're still amazing and when I hear he's working with them I'm like well we're not in your league or the league you're looking for but he said he saw the rust project that may be on our B Hance pages and it was a hypothetical project he said I love what you guys do. something about that and why he wanted us to put together a proposal, I knew the agency he was already committed to but had concerns about, so I took a chance like I was going to make a higher offer out of my comfort zone because we always get pushed in the when we chat we have our check out time and you say ask for more why are you out can you can have like ok this is that ok ok this is in a bit i think i'm going to listen to Chris again i'm going to try to get out of my zone comfort because my comfort zone was probably much smaller, so I put that part of everything together and my number, I said, is 45.
I found out that the other agency, I think, was one hundred and twenty thousand. so it was a wolf. I was like hopefully less than them but I was incredibly happy with what I got but could I haveasked more? your value you bring to the project and you are always evaluating if that client can pay you well, i want to talk about this for a brief minute because there are not many people in the program who know me as well as you do, we have had thousands of hours of conversation, sometimes personal, sometimes business, in the last 20 years that we've known each other, I just want to give you a chance here to totally make fun of me right now when I talk to you.
I'm like Erin blah blah blah they can pair up they can they can parody what you think you hear when I say these things I'd love to hear you say that for our audience for our fans I think they're going to like how you hear how you i'm barking these things what do you hear how this sounds like in your brain i mean you're ready you don't like to get your close up right oh my gosh tell people how it sounds in your brain i'll get out of your shot ahead well i mean we started we were like enemies because we were like no we were, we started out as enemies like i just wanted to crush you i never saw you it wasn't like that and then it was easy to crush you you know i always admired what you've been able to achieve and build even before the future began and it was really impressive but I think a lot of my pride and stubbornness is like I don't want to listen to someone who shows up I probably listen to my parents but I didn't want to listen to you so ue to you it's like i could realize i'm going to do it my way and i had to realize that you're giving me some really sensible advice so it's hard for me to be perry with you but i just have to break down walls and leave you as if you were younger than me but i regard you as my wise uncle i don't know if that's an insult but i know you provide so much knowledge whether it's correct or not it's like i start filtering it and start letting it slowly so it's a slow spin but I think I'm more open to listening to you because I think you provide great content for your audience and I think they see incredible value so it's as much as you want me to poke fun at you I'll appreciate it ok ok ok can i turn We can do that?
You can do what you want man. they can make fun of me because other people have done it and they've done a fantastic job so this is what i heard aaron used these words the enemy crawl and burn so they can put that stuff together alright it's all good We have a great relationship, guys. Okay, Erica, Emmanuel and Sam, you guys have a few last thoughts before the presentation closes. I have a question from a son. What do you do when your professional opinion or project differs from what the client wants and you can't convince him? use it, yeah basically what do you do when your clients start to move the project away from what it's supposed to be?
How do you respond to that? That's a great question. We are challenged with this all the time. of the day ultimately they are the customer and they hired you to provide a service to them the best we can do is we can oversee the process the best we can also we know we probably know more than they do on a brand standpoint so the best we can do is say that our professional advice is that we urge you to do this Altman ultimately at the end of the day they are going to do what they are going to do and it will be so you have to pick your battles but you try to do what's best for the customer and, but at some point you have it, you have to let it do what it's going to do, okay? for coming on the show Aaron before we say goodbye I want to see some of your work and talk a little about your journey and then I'm going to send this out okay with some music I think I can say you can say anything later when you talk about my journey, it's like I want to yell at people that a I'm not here in the studio and those are all my past and present employees just because, because they helped shape who I am and they helped shape the business, so this result is a collective, a collective group of young and really talented people, so just you.
I know I want to make sure everyone knows this is not me. This is a collection of people who really think like me. Well, I can't leave you there. Well, I can't when you say it's not me. transform from the guy who's like III can't even hire an intern to cut things for me from ten years ago when that was in 2000 somewhere in 2005 to now 13 years later what happened to that man what happened to him to Peter Pan you know. I realized that to grow you have to accept that you don't know everything, so I think I was very honored when I hit rock bottom and reassessed who I am and who I wanted to be.
I wanted to do things that are bigger than me and do things that fulfill me and I think that one of the best things that I have learned and that fulfills me is to help others to be better people too, so for me it no longer works, the work does not work for myself. I do it to support and nurture my staff and my clients and I think that's the biggest reward it's not a monetary thing it's not a reward z' on the wall it's really like seeing the people I work with and the clients I work with work having success life and there are a couple of designers on my staff and my staff who are actually taking things that they learned from me and then mentoring students now so they are volunteering their time on the weekends and created their own show and they're sharing information that they learn from me so that was pretty powerful so I just want to continue to empower people to empower people to be in that situation.
I wasn't in that situation when I was a solopreneur I was just focusing on myself Now I'm focusing on something beyond me so when I say it's not just me I'm trying to lead a team and you just know they're the ones that help with vision and guide. this path that we're all going down isn't that i'm just trying to pave the way hmm-hmm ok so this is what i hear from you is that when you work alone as a solo entrepreneur it kind of becomes like this echo chamber and i hate to say it like that but i was so self centered it was all about me me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me I, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, I, I read this correctly is that now you are proud of the work you do, but how you are transforming other people's lives, so that when your team grows and they do a great job, you can take pride in what you were able to do. creating space or mentoring or mentoring or just helping them find the right clients to get to that place and then you too couple that with that it wasn't about what you wanted to do from a design standpoint which is very self centered and egotistical it was about of helping your clients have the same kind of success so that you can't have a successful business without being a different kind of person mm-hmm everyone wants to be successful so few people are willing to do the work it takes to change and for me that is what you have been able to do, you have taken everything that I believe is an accumulation of your experiences and prejudices and you have gone against it you have let go of so many things and that is what it has been I think the key to your transformation I think it's pretty spot on I think you're escaping your comfort zone and challenging yourself and I think that's when you grow as an individual and then you learn from that and then you challenge the people who challenge you. odean to help them grow so getting out of that comfort zone I think is a big part of growing up to be able to get out of their comfort zone you have to be able to accept the fact that you don't know everything well so let's go through a couple of last slides and then we'll close the program or close the program here's some more stuff of course guys you can go to Hanson's search farm layout there's a couple of farm layouts in there but you'll recognize the work and then you can look at the rest of his portfolio and I think Aaron will be relaunching the site on Thursday so if you go to the design net farm hmm you can see the newly minted site and this is some really wonderful beautiful work you have great care to the details, patterns, textures, and color palettes, and I truly love all the contextual applications it provides. seeing it in context makes it feel so real and so rich.
I don't mean in terms of price, but it's just a feast for the eyes. I think that's what you want to do and you see this diversity. Now I look at this little boy. that i loved basketball and you're an athlete tic dude and then i see what you've become as the boy from montana to the man that's like running in spartan races and you're pretty tough and you're super competitive so competitive i like it just leave me in the dust you keep doing these things like i'm trying to cross the finish line with a limp and you're a guy who was scared of commitment afraid of being out in public to speak at Ted great achievement there congratulations to you and making the ultimate commitment and getting married and before we somebody start crying we're going to end the show like this ok yeah it's over quick yeah so im going back to me erin thanks for coming on the show mate i know this is a great time for both of us because there were so many fewer questions and concerns and all that kind of stuff about what it entails and I'm so grateful that you've been so transparent and shared all the high points and low points, I was a little surprised that you could talk about the money you had and you just let it go maybe it's all out there so guys we don't have an applause track but thank you very much i'm going to close the show let's drop this let's do let's try this the music sounds appropriate

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