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No-stick Neapolitan pizza — 75% hydration

Jun 06, 2021
this video is sponsored by hot ash what someone like me would call

neapolitan

pizza

today is certainly the

pizza

that most directly descends from the original pizza, but

neapolitan

pizza today is really defined, i think, by reckless levels of

hydration

in the dough, extremely moist, soft and

stick

y dough. it gives you a texture like no other, but it's difficult to work with. I'll show you a way to make a terribly moist dough that won't

stick

to the peel or break up a pizza you can top. Your free time and deliver to the oven when the fire is ready.
no stick neapolitan pizza 75 hydration
I don't have the traditional Italian double zero flour. I only have high quality bread flour here and whenever I make dough I usually start with five or six cups of flour. I don't normally weigh things down, but to be precise about

hydration

, I'm going to take this to about 700 grams, about a tablespoon of regular active dry yeast, which is apparently like 9 grams. I didn't put a full spoon in the first time. there you could flower it to make sure it's still alive first, but I feel lucky. A tablespoon of kosher salt, which apparently weighs about 15 grams.
no stick neapolitan pizza 75 hydration

More Interesting Facts About,

no stick neapolitan pizza 75 hydration...

Normally I like to add a little sugar and a little olive oil, but Neapolitan dough. Traditionally it's just four ingredients, the fourth is water and I'm going with 75 percent hydration, that doesn't mean the dough is going to be 75 percent water, which would be crazy. Baker's percentages tell you the proportion of the ingredient in relation to the flour content. so I have 700 grams of flour 75 of 700 grams are grams or milliliters of water, which is about two and a quarter cups, which is about the amount of water that I normally start with for a New York style pizza, the difference is that I'm not going a I add more flour as needed I'll scoop it up as best I can with a spoon when it becomes useless I'll put it in with my hands when they become useless I'll go back in with the spoon I was surprised at how well This worked just by letting the dough stick to it spoon and using the spoon to stretch the dough and fold it over itself.
no stick neapolitan pizza 75 hydration
You can really see the gluten network forming there. Knead the dough as you like. There are a million ways I would probably use it. my stand mixer if you weren't looking, but this was pretty easy for me and it's okay if it doesn't look ready yet, I'm going to need it a little more after it sits under a wet towel for an hour or two. Normally, I just portion my dough into greased bowls and let them ferment in the cold for days. It's very easy, you get great flavor, but it also gives you a pretty fine bubble structure which is the opposite of what you're trying to achieve with a Neapolitan. pizza, the goal here is huge cavernous bubbles, the steam and elasticity of the water in the dough are probably mainly responsible for that, but it also helps achieve a faster rise at room temperature.
no stick neapolitan pizza 75 hydration
Here it is about 90 minutes later, I'm going to use that wooden spoon again to tap it and knead it a little more, as I understand it, it's about redistributing the yeast through the dough to bring it into contact with fresh starch to metabolize with an increase quickly, they can easily eat everything in their vicinity. and they end up sitting there in their own waste products, yuck, this is where things get a little unconventional. I'm going to lay out a couple of large sheets of parchment paper. It's not precise, but it's certainly the easiest way to portion out dough this sticky.
It's cutting a little with scissors, I'm just trying to cut a quarter and place it on the parchment, it doesn't matter, it's not a smooth round ball, if you want your pizza to be a neat circle, you can tidy it up a little bit. , but don't try to peel the dough off the paper, they are now permanently attached and that is the idea. I'll cut another one and make sure I have it a good distance from the first. In a pizzeria they would put them in giant containers where they can rise and spread outward without merging with their neighbors, but I don't have anything like that in my house again.
I usually lift into greased containers, but that requires you to deflate them a bit. a little when coming out, especially if it is a wet and sticky dough, you need that gas for Neapolitan style pizza. I have to cover them with something or they will dry out. I can't put a towel or plastic wrap on them. They would stick together, so let's put them under a dome, a large bowl or some other type of container in each one, enough room to grow and they won't dry out, what long, a few hours until they spread a lot and become very swollen.
I had plenty of time to assemble my new pizza oven from the sponsor of this video, Hot Ash. This is a local company here in Georgia and I actually had the opportunity to give a little input on their design process. It's not like any other pizza oven because it's not just in a pizza oven, you stack those two pieces and you have a fire pit that feeds a lot of air into the fire from below, so it lights up very easily and look, the base remains completely cool to the touch, you stack these two pieces and You have a pizza oven, yes it comes with a pizza stone, but you can remove it and stack it on the grill with a lid.
Behold the glory of modular design. It is also foldable so you can travel with it. It is solid food grade stainless steel. It can easily reach the extremely high temperatures typically used for Neapolitan pizza, and unlike other portable outdoor pizza ovens that only do one thing, this one is also a great old-fashioned fire pit and wood-burning grill. Order your three-in-one wood-fired pizza. oven today at hotashstove.com that link is in the description thank you hot ash also thank you to another local company here in georgia who provided this beautiful kiln dried firewood because I'm not a lumberjack ok our dough has successfully sold out now I'm alone I'm going to flour the top and my hands and then push into the center.
The name of the game with Neapolitan pizza is to flatten and stretch the inner disk of dough without deflating the outer ring. The cornice or cornicione in Italian, so I don't want to touch it. that normally people would work with dough this wet in a huge pile of flour to prevent it from sticking. This is already stuck to the parchment and okay, hug it. I'm never going to lift this off paper. I'm just going to push it out onto the paper, as long as you keep your fingertips dusted with flour, this should be very easy, it takes a minute, but no expert hand is needed, just push the dough out without deflating the dough. ledge and guess what happens if you make a hole in this dough, it doesn't matter with this method, not even a little bit of each of these will only make a 10 inch pizza for one or two people, that's because a lot of The dough of a Neapolitan pizza does not stretch and on top of that it fluffs up also when the time comes to cover them you have to be especially conservative the bread is the main event with Neapolitan style just a little sauce what is that sauce?
Well traditionally it would be canned San Marzano tomatoes, I say just use the best canned tomatoes you have wherever you live and I am always impressed with these, although when working with whole canned tomatoes I prefer to take them out of the canning liquid. You can mash them by hand, but I like to puree them until smooth and with the Taste the difference between those and canning liquid, the liquid tends to be a little bitter and would dilute the sauce. I say skip it. I'll just put a good amount of olive oil and a little salt.
Without pre-cooking. It's pretty traditional when I make New York style pizza, I don't put salt in the sauce because it's covered in tons of salty cheese, but that's not what's going to happen here. The Neapolitan style uses fresh mozzarella, not the extra dry, fermented low-moisture product invented here in the says the thing about the fresh stuff is that you can't use much of it, it's full of water and will turn the pizza into a kiddie pool. . If you put too much cheese on it, you can slice it, but I like to just tear off chunks. The last thing I like to do sometimes is brush the cornice with a little oil to give it a nice golden finish, but not everyone likes that.
Oh and basil, some people put it in now, I prefer to put it after the pizza. it is baked and how we bake it when it is hopelessly stuck to the parchment. It's time to do crafts. I'm simply going to cut the pizza on a now personalized parchment round. It will be baked on the paper you want to minimize excess around the edge. although because that will burn and that's it, instead of topping that pizza with a giant pile of grits and then taking it to the oven to slide it in before it sticks, we have all the time in the world to prepare the four pieces and take them outside, this is particularly advantageous when working with natural fires that run on their own schedules, look at that slide now if you had put in enough wood before this stove could easily reach 800 fahrenheit 425c where Many people like to make Neapolitan pizza or even higher.
In fact, I found that I prefer maybe 650 Fahrenheit 340c. I am a man who likes cheese to be browned and if you want it to be browned you have to give it time beforehand. the crust burns, so the most moderate temperature is still much higher than I can reach with my oven inside, that's important so that all the water in the dough vaporizes and makes big bubbles if you're nervous about scooping that with the shell. No one says you can't grab it with tongs at home and now we can put basil on it and let the heat of the pizza gently soften it.
How can we remove the scroll like this? It's that easy to crunch. that bubble there that elasticity and the steam of the wet dough creates this pastry consistency these glassy layers almost like filo dough quite special here's one where I didn't brush the ledge with oil by the way, it's just a different effect, more of a flower powder finish choose now, I'm sure you've been wondering if the parchment somewhat inhibits heat transfer to the bottom of the pizza. Yes, I think it does a little. That's why I don't normally do this, but look, we still have. some leopard spots in there for comfort and peace of mind.
I think it's a good trade off if you're a pro, forget it, but if you're like me and just dipping your toes into these super high hydration masses. say baking and building on paper makes it easy

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