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KnifeCenter FAQ #14: Folding Vs Fixed Blades? How To Sharpen Recurves, Best Knives for Arthritis

Jan 02, 2022
Hi David C. Andersen, here from KnifeCenter, and welcome to KniFAQ Series 14, where I answer all of your questions about

knives

, big or small, sharp or razor sharp. You already know what to do. Today we have some interesting things to talk about. I'm going to go through a couple of old questions that we have new and updated information for, as well as some cool new stuff to check out as well. Let's do it. Before I get into the questions, I promise you guys our giving season is almost over. We are very close to reaching the hundred thousand subscriber mark.
knifecenter faq 14 folding vs fixed blades how to sharpen recurves best knives for arthritis
And if you enjoy the content and haven't subscribed yet, I would definitely appreciate it if you could click that button and help us get over that rut before the end of the year, it would be a great way to end 2020. On a positive note. But once we get to that, I'll shut up again. But in the meantime, let's get into the questions. First of what comes from Charles Mirisola says what is a good EDC slicer Blade size of three or four inches. I like it that big. Good big open question there. And, well, up to a point, pretty much any knife can cut.
knifecenter faq 14 folding vs fixed blades how to sharpen recurves best knives for arthritis

More Interesting Facts About,

knifecenter faq 14 folding vs fixed blades how to sharpen recurves best knives for arthritis...

If we break it down and think about things that are actually geared specifically towards longer cutting cuts and for me. I generally think of more time as part of an integral part with cutting. I like things that have a lot of belly, have a continuous belly around the edge, even better. And I like that because as you move your, your elbow as you move through a cut on that curve, it's very easy to make it follow the curve or the twist of your arm as you go through the material. So that's what I like to look into.
knifecenter faq 14 folding vs fixed blades how to sharpen recurves best knives for arthritis
I actually have to know from my personal EDC rotation, that I can show you what I really like. The first is the Spyderco Spydiechef. Obviously this is used as you can see like I said this is one of mine that has seen a bit of a load for me. They come in about 230 for now. And what I like about it is the blade lengths from three to 3.2 inches, and we have lc 200, and stainless steel, which is a very good steel. I have been very happy with the performance here. Many of you may be familiar with Spydercos H1 steel in their salt

knives

which is pretty much rust proof which most stainless steels can't say rust proof of course it means less stain not rust proof spots, but h1 is the exception.
knifecenter faq 14 folding vs fixed blades how to sharpen recurves best knives for arthritis
And the LC 200 N is right up there, maybe just a little behind the H1 in terms of corrosion resistance, but it's almost rust proof. And the edge retention is so much better than H1, it's getting close to some of the most premium steels out there. And this blade shape with a Spidey chef, you might think it would be kind of a swing cut with this blade, which I think is pretty much what they were going for, but in actual use. I think it pulls off draw cuts and long cuts exceptionally well, it's got that continuous belly that's got a little bit of compensation because of the handle angle there, and it's just right at home, moving through, you know, whatever, moving through. of all kinds of cardboard things, especially it is where I experience it the most.
When you're breaking through boxes making those long cuts. It just works very, very well. Other than that it's just a nicer premium binder that has titanium to the handles frame locking wire pocket clip that is reversible. And the action, it always feels great with this knife. If you like this they go in and out real quick when in and have been tweaking it a bit the newer ones have black hardware instead of the plain hardware on this particular one but the shape is still the same and it's still a knife fantastic. For a cheaper cutter, Revo Ness, one of my favorite knives of the year, hands down.
This one is $48 right now. And it's one of those quintessential deep sub $50 di to flippers that there's a ton of stuff out there. And this one fits perfectly. Obviously, you guys know that I love nessmuk too. And this blade shape is a nessmuk through and through and has that continuous belly on this edge that I like for long cuts 3.6 inches D two steel nice heavy stonewashed finish on a super heavy but it's not. It's not like a Hinderer's work finish, but there's a nice amount of stonewash texture here that I really like. You also have a sort of fluid offset in the handle.
So he has a similar, almost similar angle of attack when he's actually slashing at that Spydiechef, not quite identical, but getting close. And it feels great again for those nice long cuts, you can still pierce really well with this because the tip is pretty much along the center line. And of course it is also a good fin. The ball bearings in the pivot liner lock are nice. The deep carry pocket clip is on the right side only on this particular one, but that's another great option for you to check out, you have to them. They are in a good variety of prices and materials.
Alright next question is from Ian McMillan he says idea for a talking point the pros and cons of sticky folders and folders to hunt and skin a great one yeah I really like it because it's something I hint at or talk about a lot from the other videos, but not as a focal point, it's more of an incidental comment when I talk about things. So let's take a look at a

fixed

blade here first I have the ESEE-JG5. Very nice nessmuk leaf shape again. since i get to pick the knives here i'm going to pick an american made nessmuk that comes in about 115 five and a half inches or sorry not just under five inches 1095 blade very good.
So the type of advantages of the

fixed

blade of course is one, it's usually going to be stronger than a folder, although there are some, you know, cheap fixed

blades

, but for the most part, your, your fixed blade goes to be stronger. It will also be easier to keep clean because there are no

folding

or moving parts to worry about. Now, the disadvantages of a fixed blade will be solved by a folder and the same is true in reverse, the disadvantages of the folder are solved by the fixed blade construction, but a folder will be more discreet and easier to carry, mainly because it doesn't it's sitting in a holster off your belt, but it will be harder to keep them clean.
And generally, again, generally speaking, not as strong as a, like a fixed play, especially a nice full tank fixed blade, like this, but some people will want to take a binder for those reasons, you'll be able to fit it in a pocket on instead of on your belt it's a more compact thing overall. And actually those two knives I just showed you wouldn't make bad hunting folders, either Revo ness or Spyderco spider chef, especially the original Nessmuk was very much a hunting knife pattern, and you've got a lot of belly there to do your skinning job, and both knives have an open back construction that will be fairly easy to keep clean.
But they do have ball bearings in the pivot, so that's a potential place where you could get, you know, things could get a little sticky in there, especially if you let things dry before you clean them, but you're not going to do That or you're not going to take care of them. So those are decent options. An even better option though, at least for something that tackles the clean keeping part, is the CRKT Home Front Hunter. This is around $64, has a 4116 stainless steel blade, nothing spectacular in terms of the wow factor, but definitely very useful and easy to maintain.
And the whole front of house thing is the field strip mechanism that allows you to take this knife apart, very easily without tools, whether you're out in the field, you can rinse it out with your canteen or in a stream that kind of thing. Or if you are using this, let's say in the kitchen or to prepare some food. It's just a handy little thing of course it's got a great raised profile here another great slicer it's kind of a complementary option to those first two knives I showed you but there you have it if you're going to pull out a hunting folder .
The main thing I would say is to make sure you have confidence in your ability to keep it clean and running. Good. For the next question, we're going back to a couple of weeks ago, when we had some questions, or someone asked us about steak knives, and I had some, some suggestions and I threw them at you guys. the comments came up with some really great ideas, so much so that I got a little more excited. I like some of the stuff you're throwing out and I came up with other ideas as well. so it's time to revisit that question with a few more things to talk about.
So let me read that again, it's from Don Coddington which knife I would recommend as a steak knife to take to restaurants. Of course I mentioned the six endpoint

blades

, especially anything the right size you want, but for the purposes of this discussion we're mostly looking at folders and surprise surprise at this point, the first three I showed you would be really good. personal steak knives in a restaurant. You know, it's not a coincidence that I choose these questions, so I kind of saw some symmetry here that I wanted, because it's like taking these three knives through the questions, but I think they're really fun, I mean, especially for me. a spider chef.
This would be great you've got that that nice stainless steel blade very very stainless pretty easy to keep clean nice sleek profile and you've got a little bit of an offset like I said they thought for cutting board work but that goes to give you some knuckle clearance on a plate if you're using it to slice steak. And with that long cut profile like that. Good for long slicing cuts Good for skinning Good for cutting meat on your plate or even off the bone, so to speak. Very good option for but I have more for a more affordable kind of spinoff that gives me something similar to Spidey chef CRKT's overland which came out this year not a bad option 55 bucks now and you I have the same type of offset to give you that knuckle clearance.
Eight stainless steel cars, really easy to maintain, especially if you dig into the plate, a little further than you anticipate, it will be easier to regain that advantage. And while this is sort of a modified Wharncliffe, you don't have quite as much of a belly. It's still going to work pretty well because of that offset because the belly that's there for your steak knife cuts. Beyond that I have a few more, the Kershaw tumbler which I think would be really cool. This is 70 bucks in Dimitri syncovich design D to steal, about three and a quarter inches of blade, and it also has their subframe lock, which is kind of cool.
So you get most of that lightweight handle material here on the back, but you still get the full contact lock type of a frame lock which is great. Now this one doesn't necessarily have knuckle room in the same way, but because of the curve down to the handle here, and the raised tip with a lot of belly on this, it's going to present that belly nicely. When you go to slice on a plate to cut that steak, you just have the whole cut profile, right there, as you're going to town. But this would be another good three to four inch slicing knife cutter in there at first.
Three plus three more Spyderco Ikuchi one of you mentioned this in the comments of the last video, excellent option. Very nice. One hundred and forty dollars too, so it's not too fancy. 30v blade three and a quarter inches long. Again good end points will present that edge and a very nice angle to the meet and it's a nice elegant look so it wouldn't look so out of place maybe like that car Katie if you were in a very tall. end restaurant. But you have the compression lock, so it rotates, you can close it very easily and in a very nice way.
It's not a flipper tab, some sort of spinning wheel, or spinning semicircle that works great for throwing that blade. Now one of the other things that you guys mentioned was some traditional traditional knives like the Opinels and the Laguioles which, again, are really great and also come at two drastically different price points. I have both here. I have one of my Opinels at the top. You can tell because it's a little, a little bit dirt corroded there's a little bit of patina on the carbon steel blade here but these are great like 15 bucks really thin blades nice thin edges going to work great , nice and comfortable Both will be perhaps a little more difficult to keep clean, so keep that in mind.
Especially since they are not disassembled twice, and you have to be careful with the open-pored wood on top, but it is not a bad option. However, the Laguioles are definitely more expensive than this one. This one is on sale right now for around 170. Normally they are around 200 so they are definitely expensive. And you're not necessarily getting exotic materials, but you're getting a piece of history with this style of knife that's been around for a long time and definitely looks very classy for this one in particular it has walnut for the 12c 27 scales for the blade and the forum guy of the same name or not of the samename but trademark forum a really intricate rear spring and the little be there at the top of that backswing so this is a slip joint by the way not a non-locking binder but definitely not se it would look out of place in a fancy restaurant and even comes with a nice leather case to take it with you.
Alright, next question is from Cyber ​​DD. Do you have a model with a sim eject tool or something pointy that could be used to remove sim trays from smartphones Yes I actually have one I have never thought of that before. But there are a couple of good options and I would look at the Swiss Army knives that have the pin in their scales and there aren't many of them out there. The Victorinox compact is a good recommendation. In general, but since you're talking specifically about the phone, I guess you can work a lot with computers or other technological things.
So in that case, I am going to recommend the cyber tool. There are a few different versions. This is the entry version that costs $78. And there are versions that add things like scissors and pliers and additional layers of tools as you go up. But if on this particular knife you pull the corkscrew back here, you're going to see a little essentially a sewing pin. Nice and narrow and that will work well if it's a little too pointy it would be very easy just take some very fine sandpaper or a nail file or even a nail file this swiss army knife doesn't have a nail file but it could smooth that advice a bit, and that might help.
I'm sure I'm sure Thomas my video editor is having a great time trying to focus on this little guy, so I'm going to wait a little longer for him to earn his paycheck today. But the other thing I actually had a great suggestion, another use for a pen like this is to clean the USB ports or the charging ports on your phones as well. Real, especially if you have dulled the point. Personally, I feel a little better about it if I have, but it's nice to go in and remove any lint and dust from your pocket that might get in there and affect the power, charging, or capabilities of those ports.
So yeah compact would be good or any of these cyber tools would be good. But cyber tools also have a few other things you could use, we've got a nice screwdriver here, it's an eyeglass screwdriver, but there are a lot of little screws to deal with in electronics. And then on the front end you actually have a little bit driver here with a few different sizes of bits that you can use and this is just a standard size. What is the eighth inch bit I think. So if these particular bits don't suit you. You can use a few others, but again, great for some of the electronics out there.
And the fact that you can store those extra bits right there is pretty cool, especially if you work on the same machines all the time and know you need the same drivers all the time, put them in your pocket, you don't have to worry about it. And you've got a nice half stop on the arm here so you can apply a little bit of torque to the head of the screw if you need to, or you can use it inline as well. Other than that you've got your blades and your can openers and bottle openers and the beautiful translucent scales because it's a good tech model so that's a nice touch.
And then of course the range goes up. You can spend up to 105 on this if you want even more tools than this particular one offers. Alright, next question is from John Gunter: "Hey David, could you suggest something that has the kind of edge retention of something like K390 or 10V, but can be used for heavy duty?" I would like something that I don't have to worry about rusting easily and I prefer something with a nice strong lock. Of course. Great question. I'm going to criticize your question, if only a little. k 390 and 10v can definitely be used for heavy duty in those are they have some decent hardness in there which you'll be able to use but they're not stainless so I think that's what you mean If you want heavy duty or stainless steel with extreme edge retention, you won't have to worry about that.
To get there, I would look at things. s 90v and s 110v are the knives I would use. And I think 110V is a little more stainless than S 90, so I'll show you two options. From Spyderco in that steel, the first is one of the versions of their lightweight Manix 2, with s 110v and dark blue frn handles coming in at about 143. Really nice design right now, and has a lot of the greatest hits from Spyderco. You might get sick of me saying that, but a lot of Spydercos are designed with the same basic qualities and that's what makes them, you know, Spydercos that's what makes them good.
You have a really nice, nice blade shape with a completely flat grind, so you also have great cutting geometry. And that's something, especially with a high, tall, wear-resistant steel like this, go for something that has a really sharp cutting geometry if you go for something that's a little bit more obtuse, a little bit thick or maybe you're not going to get the maximum benefit of a steel like this. So you have it here easy one handed opening with all the reversible pocket clip cord on this case good all around grip even for my slightly larger than average hands I can fit all four fingers on the main grip .
And then you've got that finger choil, to choke on if you need a little more range, or if you need to, you know, really hone in and do some really fine detail stuff, especially with the tip. It also has a Spydercos ball bearing lock. It may look like some sort of crossbar lock, but it's actually a ball bearing on a push spring or spring that pushes it onto the tang of the knife. And it just has these tabs on the outside that help you move the ball bearing back and forth, so it has a really nice ambidextrous operation.
Great for lefties and righties because you also have the reversible clip. And you can even open and close it if you don't want to. I don't want to open it anymore deliberately, and I always appreciate a lock like this because you can keep your fingers out of the way of the edge when you close it too, which is quite nice. The blade length here is about 3.4 inches and the handles, as I said, are our frn. If you want more range or something more accurate with a higher degree of perceived stability than the frn also from Spyderco, check out their military model.
This guy has a four inch blade and you have the G 10 blur that comes in at about 213 right now. Now you can also get the par three and the par so both knives have the compression lock for a bit less with this type of setup as well. But if you're looking for the longest reach for a steel knife, well. This is a great way to go. Again, you have great cutting geometry with a blade like this ambidextrous opening. It's not necessarily an ambidextrous lock in this case because it's just a liner lock, which is a good thing, don't get me wrong.
It's just not that easy. I think for lefties to use in general and a single position pocket clip slopes down in this case but this is heavy duty just a real work knife right there tons of reach tons of handle length and a bit of that oil air so you can choke to do that tip job too. It's just a beast. It will last you quite a while. It's going to have an edge that won't give up, and it's made in the USA, so I always appreciate it. Alright, the next question is from Mike Arvig and he says, I know you've followed some

sharpen

ing tips and maybe I've missed this, but how do you

sharpen

a recurve blade?
I recently got a SOG Kiku xR as a gift and I love it, but I've been hesitant to take it as much as I'd like because I don't know how to sharpen it. Sure I'd be fine the easy way there are many different ways to approach the problem but the easiest way I found is with a Rod Bay system and I always like to recommend the sharpening manufacturer Spyderco it's versatile it's easy to use. They're not outrageously expensive, they're not cheap, but they're around $73. With that you get the case, you get the two sets of rods and basically everything you need.
I will say that his gauntlet could be a little better on a recurve edge just because the stones in that system are elliptical. But those start out cheaper, but you only get a single rod set and to upgrade, with a more abrasive rod set for heavier use, will put you above where the sharp maker would be. But either would work great, and we've actually made videos about them in the past as well, so I'll be sure to leave some links in the description of those videos as well. Alright, next one is from Kevin Reed. And this is actually a revision of our previous question as well.
I'll read it real quick, I'm looking for an inexpensive EDC knife for a woman who is easy to open and close and who has

arthritis

. So I forgot about that question last time, because I don't really have

arthritis

, so I was looking for some feedback from you guys and you gave it to me and I really appreciate it. One thing that was mentioned that I didn't mention the first time around was going with a fixed blade. Yo, the reason I didn't mention a fixed blade the first time even though I'm always a fixed blade proponent is that you asked for it to be easily opened and closed, so I assumed you were looking for a binder.
But there are plenty of neck knives on the market that would work. There are some, some cold steel thrusting daggers that would work great, but we'll leave a link to our neck knife video that you can check out. But I have a recommendation here, it's not a budget recommendation. But I do think that's worth talking about for arthritis sufferers in general, and that's the Spyderco Enuff which comes in about 126. It has a nice kydex sheath, and it's just a nice compact fixed blade to carry all the days. The reason I wanted to show off this particular blade is because I think the handle design will be very conducive to the types of uses you're looking for, for one thing it's got plenty of length, again a bit larger than average hands. here i can still fit my four fingers in that handle even though you have a pick there on the back.
And on top of that, the handles are really nice for this kind of use because you've got a lot of grip, you've got Spydercos' two-way front, so it's easy to hold onto. But it's not just a flat slab, they've actually given it a nice fixed blade swell as well, so it will fit the end of the hand nicely. I think ergonomics especially will be very important for this type of use, and it also has the finger guard built in, so you have some safety there. So I wanted to include this knife in the equation, although it's not necessarily a budget consideration.
But a few different blade shapes are a bit available around two and three quarters of an inch on this particular Vg 10 flat ground great utility knife. Now, as far as other options, you guys had some really good things to say, many, many arthritis sufferers said, like frame locks and liner locks weren't too big of an issue for you guys. Not too bad so I would stick with my my my Lion Steel Spyderco collab that I showed in the last video not budget though but two things on the budget side here for you Emerson wave was mentioned . a few times, and you can get that, for not a lot of money with the Kershaw Emerson Collaboration Series.
This one in particular, the CQC-6K, costs $48. D two-blade steel on this particular one, though there are stainless steel options in the series. And because you don't have to worry about opening it with your thumb, or because you have the Emerson wave, you don't have to worry as much about using your thumb, you can use it to hook the pocket hem and open it as it pulls out of said pocket . But if this woman is going to keep it in her bag, it might not be the

best

option. But I'll get to my ultimate recommendation for this.
And that's the CRKT BT fighter knife for budget arthritis sufferers that comes in at $45 and is a very, very easy knife to operate. Not only does it have the lock button there that is easy to press, not necessarily easy to inadvertently press, but when you press that button. It's very easy to close the blade, either like this, or use two hands to close it, no problem there too. And it's a very easy flipper to operate and the action is also very good on these knives. Very easy to use, very easy to operate the lock and open the sash.
And of course you can also open it with two hands if you don't want to flip, no problem, there's plenty to grab even there. If you use the thumb pose. But beyond that, it's just a great little usable form. It's just a simple handle, it's a glass-reinforced nylon, but its pattern looks a bit more elegant, so it might score some style points for this woman in your life, and the blade shape is very useful eight cr 13 mo v steel sub three inches so it will be something that can be taken most places and just a great little shape for tasksEDC daily utility, stonewashed finish.
I really liked this knife, and I think it would be a very good choice for you, sir. Alright, our last question comes from Rogue Piston looking for potential career or job opportunities where I can use my knives as much as possible in work settings, legally of course, any suggestions. Well, secret agent, obviously, but yeah, that's not a non-serious suggestion. But I would say that working in food preparation or cooking in today's world is probably one of the last remaining job genres where your ultimate success and survival survives, at least in part thanks to your skill with a blade.
Not many people can say that anymore and there's something, something a little satisfying about it. So if you are working in a kitchen doing prep work with the kitchen knives in there. Or, you know, butchery or meat processing, that kind of thing. You're going to live and die by your knife skills and what you're capable of doing with the blades every day, and what the output of your knives is, so that's great. Take a look at those industries. But that's all for today's questions, thanks to everyone who has been submitting their questions in the comments on these videos.
If you have any questions, go ahead and ask. And maybe we'll get a chance to introduce it in a future installment. In the meantime, if you'd like to get your hands on any of these knives, we'll leave links in the description to take you to

knifecenter

.com. While you're there be sure to sign up for a knife rewards program if you're going to buy one of these knives you might just like Warren some free money to spend on your next one I'm David C. Andersen from the KnifeCenter. Thank you all for sticking around, thank you all for subscribing, we are going to hit that mark very soon.
See you next time.

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