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IT'S COMING. April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse: Here's what you need to know -Smarter Every Day 295

Mar 04, 2024
Have you ever doubted something? And you say, yeah, I hear people talking about that. But then you experience it and you say, okay, I'm a believer. I'm in. I'm

total

ly into this. That's w

here

I am with

total

solar

eclipse

s. In 2017, I met a guy

here

locally. His name is Dr. Gordon Telepun. He is a surgeon. And he just told me, "Dude, you're going to fall in love with

eclipse

s." And I thought, maybe. I don't

know

. I heard great. And then I did

every

thing possible. I thought, okay, I trust this guy. What's the worst that can happen?
it s coming april 8 2024 total solar eclipse here s what you need to know  smarter every day 295
I look like an idiot on the Internet to millions of people. So I did it. I went to Wyoming in 2017. I saw a total

solar

eclipse for the first time and it melted my brain. I didn't understand

what

I was seeing. In fact,

every

thing I had prepared to do, I simply forgot how to do. It was incredible. That is. Take off your glasses. Stars. Oh wait, it's upstairs. Sunset. And I want you to experience that too. The other night I was at a gathering with a group of friends, and someone comes up to me and says, hey, Destin, this eclipse thing, right?
it s coming april 8 2024 total solar eclipse here s what you need to know  smarter every day 295

More Interesting Facts About,

it s coming april 8 2024 total solar eclipse here s what you need to know smarter every day 295...

Do I really

need

to do this? And my answer is, yes, you should. Because once you see it, it was. One of the most incredible and emotional experiences I have had, besides seeing my own children being born. I still talk about it to this day. Well, as I am now. It changed my entire perception. It really made me want to see more things like that. And the fact that it happens on Earth for free and you can go see it, it's amazing. As soon as it started to get dark, you could hear the insects changing. Then there were all these cicadas that were calling.
it s coming april 8 2024 total solar eclipse here s what you need to know  smarter every day 295
And then when the eclipse started happening, the sound of the cicada faded away and the sound of the cricket faded away, and then it was the other way around, and that blew my mind. I wasn't expecting that. I have only seen a total solar eclipse once in my life. And it was amazing in the literal meaning of the term awe, frightening, like terrifying, like terrifying. Because of the immensities of the astronomical bodies involved. I felt so small. And that morning when I woke up,

know

ing that this was going to happen in a matter of hours, I was very scared.
it s coming april 8 2024 total solar eclipse here s what you need to know  smarter every day 295
I don't know exactly why, but I think it had something to do with knowing that it was such a big event that involved such big things that were so vital to our lives and also that I couldn't stop it. It was inevitable that this would happen. I couldn't press a pause button and make it wait until it was ready. I loved.

2024

. This is your best chance, if you live in the United States or northern Mexico, to see a total solar eclipse. And I don't want you to miss it because I love you and I want you to love eclipses.
That's where I am. The current moment is called totality. This is when the disk of the moon obscures or occludes the disk of the sun. And at that moment all kinds of things happen. And that's the only time you can see it. You can see the mountains of the moon along the perimeter of the sun because you can see the jagged edges. That's called bailey beads. You can see

what

is called a diamond ring, the ejecta around the sun. You can see the crown. Is awesome. And you can only see it if you are there, in the path of totality.
You have to physically be on this strip of land that runs across the entire country. If you are 5 miles outside of that land, it doesn't work. The math doesn't work for you to see the total solar eclipse. We were just out of the path of totality and I set up cameras all over the farm to see how my animals would react to the solar eclipse. And they stayed there. It got dark, it got cold, it got light, it got warm again and they continued eating. What a disappointment. So if it's possible financially or with work, if you can take this trip with someone you love, go to the path of totality and watch this total solar eclipse, because it's amazing.
There are like tens of millions of people who are going to see this event. There are articles on the Internet saying that animals are going to do strange things or that the weather could do this. I'll take some time and we'll walk slowly and I'll ask all the dumb questions to Dr. Telepun, who literally wrote a book about this moment. By the way, he spent his free time between the last eclipse and this one writing this book specifically for this moment. So we're going to learn about everything called partial phase phenomena. Now, that's the moment before the eclipse and immediately after the eclipse, there are some really interesting scientific things that happen when you're out there, like watching the eclipse and just basking in the glory of the moment.
You'll also know all the other things to look for. And you will have the cheat code. You will enjoy it on a different level. So let's do this. Let's get

smarter

every day and see all these interesting phenomena with Dr. Gordon Telepun. And let's learn about the partial phase phenomena of the total solar eclipse. Have you ever thought that maybe this is too much? Yes. What is your answer to that? I still do it. As long as my wife tolerates it, I do it. Gordon, you've created a series of, what would you call these stations? Yes, they are scientific stations that teach the science of partial phase phenomena.
Because an eclipse is much more interesting than totality. Of course, the whole thing is fascinating. It's lovely. But there is a lot you can appreciate and enjoy about the science of what is happening with the Moon physically blocking the Sun during that hour and a half between C1 and C2, first contact and second contact. Well, to be clear, Gordon loves eclipses so much that he invested a lot of his own money to create this. It is an app called Solar Eclipse Timer. I get nothing for telling you this. My friend Gordon made this and I have used it at every eclipse I have seen.
Is awesome. Basically, you go to a location, take out your phone, hit your GPS location, and it does all the calculations for you. And your voice, it is actually your voice that is endearing. Your voice will tell me how to see the eclipse. He will say that he will count the contact times of the photographers. What is a contact time? So when the moon takes the first bite of the sun, that is the first contact. C1. C1. Totality begins when the moon completely obscures the sun. That's the second contact, C2. When the moon moves away on the other side and the photosphere reappears, that is C3, the third contact.
And when the moon moves completely away, it is the end of the eclipse. That's the fourth contact. Well, to be clear, these science stations that we're talking about, the entirety is between C2 and C3. But all this happens during the partial phase phenomenon between C1 and C2 and between C3 and C4. So the first station is temperature monitoring. I have monitored and recorded temperature data on all of my eclipses, but this time, since I can bring a lot of equipment and drive it to Texas, I wanted to do more. So here I have a four-season temperature data logging tower.
Well. What we're trying to do here is document a mini investment layer. So these are temperature loggers? Those are temperature loggers. And you have three in the post. And one on the ground covered by some dirt. Well. And that's being heated by the sun right now. And these others have free circulation of air around them. So they are monitoring the air temperature. The ground sensor will decrease its temperature during the partial phases before the 20 foot sensor decreases. Basically, people at the event will start to feel the change in temperature. That's how it is. But you should know that the same does not happen at all levels.
That's exactly right. All right, let's go to the second station, Gordon. So the second station is the concept of pinhole projection of crescents. So when you hold something and it's a point, sunlight passes through those points, but crosses them. So, the light from above from the sun crosses through the hole and goes down, and the light from below crosses through the hole and goes through the crosses above and from right to left. So now we are only seeing round circles because of the sun. Did you make one for me? I made him

smarter

every day. So we are seeing round circles, but during the partial phases, these will become crescents.
Now, we are seeing round circles right now because we are not in a total solar eclipse right now, or even in the partial phases. These will then become crescents during the partial phases. And the interesting thing is that before totality, the little banana crescent will be in one direction, and after totality, it will rotate. Get some paper and make holes in it. Write your name or the date, whatever you want to do. Bring a colander to the eclipse. Yes. The kitchen utensils are great. Can you get it further away from the thing the further away it is?
Well, the further you zoom out, you see it go out of focus, and a little bit of that has to do with the thickness of what you're using. That's why it's good to use thin paper or, like a cheese grater or a cheese grater. Then a cheese grater will do. So on the day of the eclipse, people should pack up the colander. Exactly. So the other thing for pinhole projection is to make a pinhole projection shoebox. Oh, it's actually a pinhole. It's a hole in aluminum foil. And a small display box on the back and a white card at the bottom.
So when you line it up, the little crescent phase will project onto the back of the box. And it's a safe way to see partial phases because it doesn't hurt your eyes. What about the glasses? Do people

need

to wear glasses? So everyone has to go to the eclipse with certified solar eclipse glasses. Start ordering them now because they will become increasingly difficult to find. And, you know, you wear them during all the partial phases and then you take them off during the totality. This is the only time it is safe to remove your glasses. I've heard of people wearing welding goggles and stuff like that.
What do you think about that? Therefore, welding glasses are not certified because they do not block the proper amount of infrared and ultraviolet light. Therefore, they are certified to block the correct amount of viewing. It has to be ISO 12312-2. So make sure everyone accompanying you has the right glasses. You want to be safe. Do not look directly at the partial phase eclipse as this could injure you. But you can take off your glasses during totality. Whole. You have to take them off during totality, yes. Well. Sounds good. What is our next station here? So these are sharp and blurry shadows.
If you take something that is at 90 degrees this way, when you rotate it during the eclipse, the one that becomes sharp will be aligned with the crescent, the one that will remain perpendicular to the crescent, behaving as an extended source of light. That's going to be confusing. Let's say this is the sharp edge. That will be the advantage. That's going to be confusing, and it's going to be confusing. And this will be sharp. All parallel sides will be sharp and all parallel sides will be blurry. So if I'm watching the eclipse on eclipse day, when people say my shadows look weird, that's what's happening.
That's what's happening. Maybe they don't know it, but now they will know it. What do you have here? So we're going to monitor the wind in this eclipse. You will see many articles on the Internet before the eclipse saying that the weather changed during the eclipse. Well, there are a lot of thermodynamic effects during the eclipse, but it doesn't really change, it changes the weather. But there is a partial phase phenomenon that is very difficult to witness, and it is an eclipse breeze. The theory behind this is: Eclipse breeze? An eclipse breeze. Well. If you have calm conditions, at your observing site, there are some mountains or hills in the distance, but relatively close, and they are in the direction of approach of the umbra.
The soil there will cool before the soil at your observation site, just as we did in the temperature tower. And that fresh air from those valleys will merge. Roll through the valleys and you will feel a cool breeze approaching from the direction of the shadow. As the colder air becomes denser, it will roll downhill. And that's what you're going to try to capture here. That's how it is. So our viewing site has a nice flat area and also has some hills to the east and south. And then I'm going to have this point. This is a data logger.
We'll have it pointed at those hills and see if we have calm conditions, if we can catch a subtle eclipse breeze. Remember, it's subtle. Yes. This is a station that talks about the creation and dissipation of convective clouds, and they are created when the ground is heated by the sun and creates moisture that rises in eddies. And these red arrows represent warm, moist eddies rising. And when that moisture reaches the boundary layer, it condenses and forms those fluffy clouds. But they depend on continuous energy from the sun and continuous supply of moisture. So the eclipse will cut off that energy and cut off that moisture.
And those little fluffy convective clouds may dissipate before totality. Ten or 15 minutes before totality, there will be these puffy white clouds in the sky and they will start to disappear. Wow. But not all clouds will disappear to be clear, right? Yes. Disclaimer, if you are in a place with clouds, like big clouds on a cliff, keep taking your car, going down the road one way or another to try to get away from the clouds. Large, thick, gray rain clouds do not depend on this type ofenergy. They are more of a weather front type cloud and will not have time to dissipate due to the thermal decrease.
I don't know what to say about this other than this is definitely the prettiest station here. Circuit squeak What is this? Come and show me. This is to teach people about animal behavior. We are adults and we are humans and we have brains and we know that an eclipse is happening and we are watching it. We are in this field watching it because we know everything. The animals don't know. They just think it's getting dark, so they think night is approaching and begin their nocturnal behaviors. It is fascinating. This is a graph of the decrease in lux.
And again, we won't even notice that anything is changing until about ten or eight minutes into totality. But the animals will feel it a little sooner. Actually? So if you are in any natural environment, the first thing you will hear will be crickets. Crickets go crazy during the eclipse, like this place. If this were in the path of totality, it would be wild, really wild. About ten or 15 minutes before totality, the crickets will begin. The second thing people don't know, and that's why I have the bird here. If you see a group of birds in the 15 minutes before they fly in full, like they seem to be going somewhere, it's probably not random.
That's a behavior. They head to their night resting place. So be aware of that. Bees use the sun to navigate. This is how they reach their flowers. Thus they return to their hive. People put video cameras in the hives and before totality the hives became very active because the bees were trying to get back to the hive before it got dark, really? And they discovered that the bees that could not return if they were in some field and could not return to the hive, they would land and wait for the sun to return before going to the hive or going to their flowers.
So bees are very sensitive to these light changes and change their behavior. So if you're a beekeeper and you have bees and you're in the path of totality, put a video camera in your hives and you can document it. Or if you're somewhere with a flowering bush that bees love and buzz around, place a video camera on the flowering bush. It will be very busy during the partial phases, and as totality approaches, activity will decrease. Actually? Yes. That's great. Yes. What's wrong with this chicken? It's my video about the animal behavior of chickens. I had a farmer in Nashville supervise his chicken coop for me.
I mailed them a camera and tripod. It's amazing to see what the chickens did before and after totality. Let's watch Gordon's chicken video. Well. I like it. What else do we have here? This station is about the Purkinje effect. Well, this is complicated. So I'll leave the long description in the second channel video. But basically this is what happens. You have rods and cones in your. The eyes and cones are sensitive to light. So that the colors and rods are more monochromatic. Basically what happens is that as the eclipse gets closer, your eye color sensitivity changes and you start to see different colors.
The bright colors look muddy and make it feel really strange. Go watch the second channel if you want the full description. But Gordon did something really funny. That you could remember to dress bright. He colors shirts and such on the day of the eclipse so you can feel these changes in your eyes. I need to do something. Well, this is very exaggerated. Well. But I'm going to do it. Well. I invented a Purkinje effect shirt. Good, excellent. Alright. And it actually says Purkinje Effect: smarter every day. Good, excellent. This is my Smarter Every Day Purkinje effect t-shirt.
How long have you been planning this? Around a month. Well. Are you going to wear this on eclipse day? Absolutely. Alright. This is what I was so excited about in 2017. Shadow bands. Yes. Or as I call them, shadow snakes. You don't like that name, do you? I like it. Do you like the name shadow snakes? Yes. I like it because that's how I described them when I saw them in 2002, because they look like rows of undulating snakes but in rows. Millions of snakes in a row. And what you have to do is make that little slit of light form little rectangles on the ground, but they're in the direction of the slit, so they're always in rows.
And how the atmosphere will disturb them will determine what their behavior will be. So they could be moving from left to right. It might seem like they are jumping like snakes. They could be very stagnant if the atmosphere through which that light passes does not have much movement. This sounds crazy. I know this sounds crazy. It's not crazy. I saw it in 2017. If you're watching the eclipse, I hope you have your solar eclipse app, right, and I'll remind you to look for shadow bands at 90 seconds, 60 seconds, and 30 seconds before C2. Because the thing is, you're so excited for the midterms to arrive in their entirety, and the crowd is going crazy.
There is a great stir. You have to force him to look at the ground. And so it looks like if you look here, you look for shadow bands like here. That's how it is. So place a white sheet in front of your group or whiteboards. Wow. I don't know the directions, but they looked like low contrast shadows. Good? And it looks like boiling water. But it's in lines. It's in lines. It's really strange. It's difficult for cameras to capture it due to the dynamic range of the camera sensor, but just look at the ground. And you said later that it's better, right?
After is better because before C2, they fade as the lighting decreases and your dark adaptation improves. But after C3, you are dark adapted and the sun instantly returns as a very thin slit. And that's perfect for making shadow bands. My app will remind you to look for shadow bands again after C3 because they can be more dramatic after C3. This video is not sponsored. This video is supported. And when I asked the follower what he would like the call to action to be at the end of the video, he said something very interesting. They said: Ask people to reflect on the video they watch after this one because what's on their mind is important.
That is incredible. Let me tell you about these people. This is an organization called the Independent Media Initiative. It's something new if you think about it. If you're a YouTube creator, you have an incentive to create great content. For example, if I can get billions of views on a video, then I can get more people to watch it and the numbers go up and I can get more sponsorship. That means more money. Therefore, there is market pressure to create sensational content that is not good for society. By the way, I really like the cypress swamp. It's pretty cool.
I came here because it's quiet. I put a small portrait at the end of this boardwalk. Let's walk there and I'll show you something. So the independent media initiative is trying something new. They are partnering with foundations to get nonprofit money into IMI. And then they are going to try to select creators that are authentic, genuine, that are educational and artistic content. And they are going to try to create another second way to promote those creators. Like when I was a kid, there was a show I used to watch that made me think about feelings. It made me think about all kinds of things.
In fact, sometimes he did. Take a field trip to a manufacturing location, like a factory or something. Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood. It was amazing and I loved it. I want to be remembered as someone who makes things. It's like Mr. Rogers makes me feel those kinds of things, and that's what IMI, the independent media initiative, is looking for. Again I asked them: what is the call to action of this video? and they said, just to remind viewers to think about the next video they select to watch after this one, that's all. If you don't know where to start, they have a selection of creators on their website, you can check them out, it's a good place to start.
But anyway, that's it. I am grateful to IMI for the fusion award. I'm grateful for your support of Smarter Every Day and I'm grateful for what you're trying to do for the future of smart, respectful content on the internet. Thank you so much. Any last minute advice? They have to enter the band of totality, where should they go? I would watch the weather a few days before the eclipse and plan to try driving into a high pressure bubble. Okay, so have multiple options and make your decision. Be mobile. I get nothing from talking about Gordon's app, it's legitimately good, basically wherever you are on the day of the eclipse, you press a button and it will get your GPS position, and then it will just talk to you during the eclipse, just ask them to turn on their phone .
Follow and listen to the announcements. If you had to choose one or two things, what would you recommend? Pinhole projection create a card with your name Pinhole projection your name and sharp, blurry shadows And the crickets will just happen Let nature do its work

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