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Introduction to Tinkercad with a Series DC circuit

Jun 04, 2021
This video is an

introduction

to

tinkercad

, so the first thing you need to do is go to

tinkercad

.com and you're going to create a free account. Now I have an account, so I can go ahead and log in. We have created an account and logged in. Let's go to

circuit

s. Okay, there are different options here, but we'll start with

circuit

s. You can see I have a couple here or maybe a few. but let's go ahead and just create a new circuit, so let's create a new circuit and, uh, Tinkercad will give it a unique name.
introduction to tinkercad with a series dc circuit
I'm going to leave that name here for now and the first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to go to where it says components where it has basic components and I actually want to go ahead and just list all the components so instead of just basic, I'm going to list all the components even though we're just going to We're going to be using some components, we're going to use resistors and we're going to use a board that's here, so I'm going to go ahead and left click and drag my board and we're going to use a power supply. and multimeter, so let's go ahead and create just a basic

series

circuit that consists of just resistors, so the way you want to place a component is by left clicking and dragging, so with your mouse you want to left click, drag and place the component, okay?
introduction to tinkercad with a series dc circuit

More Interesting Facts About,

introduction to tinkercad with a series dc circuit...

If you want to zoom in and out you can use the mouse wheel to zoom in and out and if you want to rearrange a component you can left click and drag and in this case I need to rotate this because you can see that right now The resistor is shorted because they are all connected vertically, so I'm going to use the r key to rotate it and this is much better, so now I have this resistor that is placed in the proper orientation, one of the interesting things here. is when you hover you can see all the connections, you can see this rail is all connected, all these rails are connected, these vertical columns are all connected and the same at the bottom, the bottom rails are connected here and these vertical columns They are connected and They are separated from these up here, so this um, this space in the middle separates, let's say, column 19. um, they are all connected, but then they are connected here, but they are not connected to this one above, like this that there is an isolation here, okay?
introduction to tinkercad with a series dc circuit
So we're going to make a simple resistor of just four, so let's left click, drag and rotate and connect this resistor by placing it here so now you can see that terminal 2 of this resistor is connected to terminal 1 of this resistor. and let's take a couple more and we'll rotate and put that guy there and another one we'll rotate and put there now we have a

series

circuit so you have the resistance one terminal two connects to the resistance two terminals one resistor two terminals two connects a resistor three terminal one resistor three terminal two connects to resistor four terminal one and that's okay now we want to give these resistors some values ​​so let's left click on the resistor and this is not the default it's a kilo ohm , I'm going to make these ohms and change them to 820 so it's 820 ohms and watch what happens, the color code changes, so when you type the value, it updates the color bands of the resistor and let's do the same thing here, so maybe make this 220. so 220 um let's make this um let's leave this one in kilo ohms and let's make it uh actually 1.2 okay, let's say it's 1.6 kilos 1.6 kilo ohms and then this guy let's make this one back to ohms and let's say 470.
introduction to tinkercad with a series dc circuit
So we have Oops we have 820 220 1.6 k and four seven so we put the board in place the resistors and they are all connected in series so now we need to get a power supply so we need a power supply so again click with left click and drag and we're going to set this voltage to 12. We have 12 and I'm going to move this guy up here to zoom in a little bit. Okay, that's good, so what I want to do now is connect the power supply. I'm going to connect the positive to the positive rail, the negative to the negative rail and then run a wire into the circuit for both the positive and the negative, so let me go ahead and make it so that the way you run the wires is with just left click and you can see the end point of the cable becomes a square and you can see how that rail is highlighted.
So that's where I want to plug it in, so I just left click and then change this to red just to show okay and we'll do the same thing with the negative, but we'll bring this to the top. rail and change this to black, okay, now I'm passing my positive to the positive rail, my negative to the negative rail and now I need to bring this closer and connect the positive to this column, column five, I'm going to change this. to uh red and the same thing on this side, I'm going to connect this to the negative and change it to black and that's it, so we've created a series circuit and we have power, so let's go ahead and start the simulation.
You can see here that it's 12 volts which is what we set and this circuit draws 3.86 milliamps which tells us what the total current is but what we really want to see are the individual voltage drops so for that Let's go. We're going to need a multimeter, so we're going to take this multimeter, we're going to bring it here and for the mode we want to keep the mode as voltage because we want to measure the voltage drops across each resistor, so we go ahead and connect. these, so let's take the positive of the meter and we want to connect it to the highest potential, which will be the left side of this resistor, okay and straighten it out a little bit like this and the black the same, whichever way you want to do this. it's just left click every time you want to do a spin, just left click and then plug it in wherever you want it to go so let's make it black.
Now I have the positive of my multimeter connected to the left side of the resistor. negative connected to the right side of resistor one, so now I can go ahead and simulate and you can see I have a 3.16 volt drop. I'm going to go ahead and record that 3.16 drop, the reason I'm doing that is because when I'm done I want to add them all up to make sure I get 12 volts to satisfy Kirchhoff's voltage law, so let's go ahead and stop the simulation and I will left click on this wire and then I will press delete the same here now I am going to connect this to resistor 2, so resistor 2 we will make it red and we will connect the black, we will connect the black to the other side of resistor 2. like this I'm going to make that wire black so the wire colors are just for visual purposes it has nothing to do with how the circuit works or the measurements let's go ahead and run the simulation and this one is only 849 millivolts so that 849 millivolts will be 0.849 volts. simulation remove the wires now let's connect to resistor three so here is resistor three which is red left click here pull that a little bit and left click to make the sky turn black.
Start the simulation 6.17 volts, 6.17 volts, stop the simulation, delete, delete the wire and finally We'll make resistor four so put it red and connect it to the other side so now I have the red one connected to terminal 1 of resistor 4 and the black is connected to terminal 2. Start the simulation and get 1.81 volts, so let's add. these go up 3.16 plus 0.849 plus 6.17 plus 1.81 we have 11.989 uh volts, so that's very, very, very close to 12. So, we're off by eleven thousandths of a volt, so that's what 11 millivolts are from 12 volts, so it is, it is. very, very close, it's essentially 12, okay, then we're done.
Another thing you can do is that you can also measure the current using the meter. It's a little more complicated because to measure the current you have to break or open the circuit and insert the meter in series. Now when you're measuring voltage, the circuit remains intact and you basically put the meter in parallel with whatever component you want to measure voltage on, but for current, you have to. actually alter your circuit by opening the circuit now you could open it here here here here here I can open it at any point it's a series circuit so it will have the same current but probably the easiest thing is to go ahead and open it right here at the beginning so I'm going to remove, I'm going to remove this wire and I'm going to run a wire directly to the meter, okay, now the current will flow out of the power supply and the only connection on this rail is to the meter, so the current will flow into the meter and then will flow out of the meter until the start of the circuit, so once current flows into the meter, it will flow out of the meter and then flow. at resistor one and then at resistor one, it will flow to resistor two and then all the way here, back to the power supply and the other thing is we have to change this from voltage to amperage so we need to measure the current.
If we start the simulation, you can see that we get 3.86 milliamps, which matches what comes out of the power supply, so we have 3.86 milliamps flowing into the circuit and through the circuit and then back to the source of feeding. Well I think that's good for this video it's just a quick

introduction

to a basic DC circuit with resistors in tinkercad and it's actually quite useful. This shows you how to place components on a board as you would in a real physical lab and connect a meter. and a power supply, that's how this video will end and I hope you found it useful.

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