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How to make an Ocean Table // Concrete and Epoxy Resin

Feb 27, 2020
Hi, I'm Bob, but today I like to do things. I'm going to

make

a

table

that looks like the

ocean

. My wife loves the beach and I thought it would be great to

make

her a

table

that looks like a cross section of the

ocean

I haven't done any projects with

concrete

either so I thought this would be a good project to be able to do both ok let me show you how i made this i had a slab of heart pine to use for the legs and a big piece of melamine to use for the framing.
how to make an ocean table concrete and epoxy resin
The flooring for the

concrete

is usually made of melamine so the concrete doesn't stick together when you take it out of the form to make the formwork. just cut several pieces that were tall enough for the sides and a square for the bottom. The size here was a bit off the top of my head. I didn't want it to be too big or too heavy, but I wanted it to be big enough. to act as a side table to make this shape I just screwed the pieces together around the sides making sure they fit as tight as possible because I don't want anything leaking.
how to make an ocean table concrete and epoxy resin

More Interesting Facts About,

how to make an ocean table concrete and epoxy resin...

I put screws around the edge pieces and at the bottom to hold everything together. I wanted the legs to be set in the square so I have some smaller pieces of melamine to take up the space where the legs would go each corner was made of two pieces one the same width as my legs and a smaller piece to offset the difference in width on the other side I glued them down with some CA glue and then put them in place Every time you make a form for concrete you want to seal it and in this case I am using silicone caulk to seal all the seams.
how to make an ocean table concrete and epoxy resin
The cut edges of the melamine should also be completely sealed; otherwise the concrete and

epoxy

will stick together. to that like crazy it will be a huge pain to get out usually when people make forms to pour concrete over a melamine they do it backwards so usually this bottom surface ends up being the top surface of the countertop or whatever. we're doing but in this case this is actually going to b e the bottom of this piece so it doesn't really matter what's here after the caulk dries. I'm going to make sure I clean all the contours before I pour the concrete.
how to make an ocean table concrete and epoxy resin
I'm not entirely sure this will work but here is my plan for pouring the concrete, usually when you pour concrete you want it to be level and as flat as possible, in this case I actually go for a more beachy look and what I mean is on one side of this table I'm going to have this much concrete and this amount of water or

epoxy

and then as you go I'm going to change those proportions to make it look like it's deeper as you go towards the other side of the table I'll see if it works on the recommendation of my friend Venu ADA.
I got quikrete 5000 for this. I didn't really know how much I was going to need so I just put some in a bucket and added a little water and mixed it. where i got the consistency i wanted and then realized i needed a bit more i just went back and forth to be between concrete and water until i had a good amount mixed the way i needed to mix per the instructions on the bag, then i lifted one side of my form to get the angle i wanted and started pouring some concrete and then put the rest of the volume on top once it was all in the form i tried to compress it as much as i could and then took some time to give it Shaped to look like the beach I wanted it to be very skinny on one side and very tall on the other side, then I added some texture to the top so it wouldn't be too flat when patted.
I took the sanding pad out of my orbital sander and then ran it over the sides of the board to try and get rid of some of the air bubbles. I could have spent more time on them. I cut this big piece of heart pine to make the legs. Basically I cut off the rough edge and then put the fence where I could cut some square legs this is a really cool old piece of wood that I think was used as a countertop at some point once I cut all the legs I just looked at them and I chose the size that I thought would look the best on the outside and made sure to go back and sand down all the icky stuff all the dirt and everything on all sides.
He had some other pine paneling that he had salvaged from the same spot. These were cut into strips to act as cross braces under the table between the legs. I cut them a bit. a little oversized because I wanted to fit them exactly under the table when I was ready to build the legs, the concrete has been curing for about 48 hours and during that time I've had it covered with plastic so it doesn't dry out too fast, this is the first time doing any kind of concrete on a forum so i don't really know what i'm doing but there's a friend of mine who does a place, Aida has a channel called "modern homemade".
I'll link it in the description, it says a lot of great projects. and a lot of it has to do with concrete he pours a lot of concrete counter tops and things like that so if you're interested in more details on how to do this the right way he'll be a great resource so check out that link . now it's time to pour the epoxy in this and this is another stage where i don't know if this will work or not. I have the feeling that a lot of air bubbles are going to come out. of the concrete in the

resin

and maybe that makes it look even more like water.
I'm not quite sure, but we'll find out before we pour the

resin

. I removed all the extra bits of concrete from the side, all that was left. on the sides of the form will be on the outside of the epoxy. I cleaned all the dust off of that and then lifted my form at the opposite angle to what I had done when I poured the concrete. This will begin to level the general surface following. the instructions on the epoxy i mixed them in a one to one ratio now its very specific ic about how you are supposed to mix them and how long you are supposed to mix them you definitely need to follow the instructions exactly.
I added 10 drops of blue dye to this and wasn't sure if that would be enough or too much. but it ended up being a perfect amount once i mixed it all the way i poured it over the top of the form. I had to move the form around a bit to get the epoxy to go into all the corners and fully cover the bottom surface, it's pretty runny at this point until it starts to set once I had it all the way in. I used a heat gun to lightly go over the surface to pop any air bubbles that rise to the top after four hours when the first coat had cured I mixed another batch with the same amount of blue dye and then poured it I poured that second coat about an hour ago and I looked at it again just a minute ago and it's cracking I'm looking forward to this because I'm pouring over the maximum thickness in a single level that they recommend doing a and I'm doing it in the amount of time they recommended but apparently it's too hot and it's causing the top coat to crack now hopefully I can fill that in with the next coat and you won't even see it but I never know we'll see how it turns out after another six hours I mixed another batch then took my time to pour it into this crack first I tried to fill the crack all the way and then used the heat gun to get any air bubbles out of the crack before adding the rest on top.
Once I poured the rest of this layer, I was very happy to see that the crack was pretty much gone. I let it fully heal for another five or six. hours and then added the overall final coat. I used two gallons of epoxy for this and you can see how thick it was. I could have easily added more to make it thicker and make the water effect even bigger after that final coat. two days to make sure it was really hard and fully cured then it was time to get it out of the way by unscrewing one panel i was very happy with the way it looked i already removed the other outer panels and the side pieces came out fine the corners ended up being a bit more problematic i think spraying the mold release on the inside of the form before pouring anything would be helpful because i had to remove them with so much force that some of the epoxy broke off.
I also had to chisel off all these extra pieces in the corner which ended up looking nice because the legs go into these corners anyway so you don't really see them but it was a lot of extra work that could have been avoided if I had sealed these corners beforehand after removing all these pieces i just used an orbital sander to clean all the surfaces now every time i sand the epoxy it makes it cloudy and in this case i want it to be clear so the first pass was to try and remove all the waste and clean everything.
I used some CA glue to put them on. back corners also the ap edge of the epoxy actually increased a bit towards the melamine so it had kind of a sharp edge that had to be sanded down by sanding this edge it also tarnishes the top a bit but i will buff that out later on this point I I still hadn't figured out how to mount the legs together, so I decided to use an X system underneath to hold the legs in position. I cut those pine pieces to their final width at the final length and then had to flip them over. into an X and to do this I use the cross cut sled and set a stop block at each end this allowed me to cut the center of each of these pieces to half the depth when these two together formed an X but this is where it got a little tricky.
I cut a piece of 2x4 at 45 degrees to serve as a backing on my cross cut sled on each of the legs. A drill line where I wanted these X's to intersect. I installed a stop block and drew a line on the sled so I know where to cut on each of the legs holding the piece against my 45 degree Backrest I ran it over the blade to cut a bunch of different slots now what it does is cut a flat die at an angle into each of the legs you can see what it looks like here it ended up working perfectly so i just repeated this cut on each of the legs on both ends people often ask why i don't use a stack of dies for things like this and in this case I couldn't use my cross cut sled and I couldn't use the stop blocks or the 45 degree back just doesn't make sense in this application after cutting all eight slots I just cleaned them up and I flattened with the chisel.
I did a dry fit of everything to make sure everything fit around the table and all the joints were as tight as I wanted them to be I was very pleased and a bit surprised that it actually fit perfectly the only fasteners on all of this are a screw that i added the middle of each of the Xs coming up from the bottom side this may not be necessary b But I thought it would be nice to keep those pieces together. I added a lot of glue to each of the surfaces in each of these cutouts and then I tapped all the legs into place.
Some of them were tighter than others, but the glue will help it expand and the joint should be tight once everything was lined up and fairly square. I used some straps to pull all the legs in tight. He put all together. I put the top on to make sure I didn't make it too small that the top wouldn't fit, then I just had to let it dry, then it was time to start the sanding process. I used some spray adhesive to put 400 grit paper on the back of a piece of wood and then started sanding all the faces after this I used some 400 and some water to wet sand these same surfaces after this i wet sanded through the grits to paper about 1500 grit after that it was time to polish i bought a polishing compound which was actually very expensive and a punch one of the different options for polishing was an attachment to a drill that didn't work very well and then I went to Harbor Freight and got the cheapest polisher I could find.
This thing was around 17 bucks. I had two different types of polishing compounds so I gave it a try. both and I realized I had to do them in the correct order and there were a few places that just needed to be sanded more so I had to go back and sand and then re-polish, I basically spent an entire afternoon trying to get this surface like as smooth and shiny as i could this is one of those things i think i could go on forever and ever and you could keep buffing and sanding but i eventually got tired of doing it and he looked pretty happy with how it looked like it looked like water like this that I only wanted to finish when I got to that point and was happy with it.
I went on to sand and finish the support. I went over this all one more time with high grit paper just to smooth everything out and then used a couple coats of Danish Oil, this is not a finish I use very often but I did put some on a test piece and really loved it the way it looked so i did a couple of coats cleaning all the surfaces and i was really happy with how it made the green pop then i just dropped the top piece and it was done this took a lot longer than expected which i expected because i had to do all this multiple times also made it much more expensive thanwhich I thought it would be too, but in the end I loved how it turned out.
I love how it looks beachy and it gets deeper and then the color gets darker here like I would in RO Water I didn't put the top and sides fully buffed. I put a lot of time into it and eventually got tired of doing it, but the good thing is I didn't put the top on, the weight of this is holding. in place, which is perfectly fine, but I can take it out later and polish it up some more or if there's ever a scratch I can always remove it and fix it without having done anything concrete before there were a few things I forgot to do after doing this a few times The first time I did it I vibrated it really nice and got rid of all the air bubbles but after doing it a few times I forgot to do it so in the future I'll have to remember to do some of those things to get a more pour. solid here and not have any of these spaces ultimately. it looks very organic down here and that's great, but it would be great to have a nice solid line that matches the solid line at the top.
The concrete looks a bit white here and I think it's mostly the polish I was using on the epoxy. that it stuck to the concrete, so I should have sealed the concrete first before polishing it I think, but I'm going to go back and seal it anyway and see how it turns out. I wasn't quite sure how this wood works either. I would look next to these things. I was really focusing on the top and was going to figure out the finish on the wood as I went along. I thought I'd paint it white to make it look a bit beachy.
I thought of making a steel frame. instead, but I realized that would probably make it look very cold in the end. I loved that the wood has an orange color next to the blue water and I think it's a really good combination. I am very happy with it and more importantly my wife is very happy with it. I'd love to know what you think. this or if you've done something like this I'd love to see it let me know in the comments I have lots of other projects of all sorts you should definitely check out and don't forget to subscribe that's for this one guys thanks for watching see you next time

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