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How This Became The WORST Episode Of The Office

Jun 16, 2024
Psst. It's me, Erin. Dwight made me pretend he was a hipster to create buzz. And he is working. There are already people camped behind me. This is bad. And that was obviously an opinion. The Office is perhaps the most successful television show of all time. I have an entire miniseries on

this

channel dedicated just to that show. But I think the most interesting thing about The Office years after it aired is how opinion is molded into something almost omnipresent in some of the show's

episode

s. This is the injury. It is, in my opinion, the best

episode

of The Office.
how this became the worst episode of the office
And making that video made me aware of something else. That's it, with Scott's Tots being considered by many to be the

worst

episode of the series. But I wasn't sure I agreed with that. So I did some research, searched the internet, and came across something more than a little subjective, almost objective, if you can call it that. And what I discovered is that Scott's Tots is not considered the

worst

episode of the series in terms of ratings. In fact, it doesn't even rank among the 15 lowest-rated episodes. So I decided to take a look at what are considered three of the show's worst episodes and analyze what goes wrong when The Office fails.
how this became the worst episode of the office

More Interesting Facts About,

how this became the worst episode of the office...

For the record, not all Italian Americans are in the mafia. I think it seemed like he was trying to sell me insurance. This episode is a season six episode titled Mafia. During the show's run,

this

episode was considered one of the show's worst. For a while, it was also my least favorite episode. But unlike the next two episodes, it doesn't get here. This is IMDb, something that, if you're here, I'm sure you're familiar with. It's a rating system that allows viewers to vote on the best and worst of, well, anything, by assigning a rating to each episode of the show, objective because it creates a ranking based on those votes, subjective because they're still votes. or qualifications.
how this became the worst episode of the office
So what's wrong with this? Mafia is a very funny episode of The Office. But it's one of the only episodes in the first six seasons that runs the risk of Flanderizing the show's characters. If you're here long enough, you know what that means. But for those who aren't, Flanderization is the act of taking a single trait of a character and exaggerating it to the point where it becomes the character, swallowing the entire personality. The mafia invades this territory in a big way. Kevin has never been the brightest guy on Earth. We know this. But in Mafia, he behaves so incredibly stupid that he ends up stranding Jim and Pam on their honeymoon after talking to a banker and cutting up their cards.
how this became the worst episode of the office
This is because he uses Michael's

office

only for flattery, pure ineptitude. Meanwhile, Michael mistakes an insurance salesman for a mafia member. Well, that's funny. Well, that would have been fun. Instead, Dwight and Andy convince Michael that he is a member of the mafia and accompany him for an entire episode. The problem is that none of them seem to be aware that this insurance salesman is just that, absurdly inept. Actually, the point here is stated by Oscar. Pam and Jim are on their honeymoon. So there is not the usual balance between the sane and the rest. By removing Jim and Pam from this episode, you have a chance to give your supporting characters time to shine.
Instead, this episode shows each character at their most foolish, manipulative, and conniving. The branch does not branch. Flanders. This Flanderization actually becomes the show's biggest downfall, both at the beginning and end of its run, forcing the show to rewrite Michael after the first season and reintroduce Andy as essentially an entirely new character after he he ended his run as an original guest. And to top that off, obviously this Flanderization was exactly what brought the show down in the last two seasons, specifically with Andy Bernard once again. But to this day, I find Mafia hilarious, even as it foreshadows the show's potential problems.
So I kept searching. That wasn't helpful. Andy is gone. Jim is out. I feel like I'm alone here. Remember how I said Mafia didn't give its supporting characters a chance to shine with the personality you'd expect? Well, this is the 15th lowest rated episode of the entire series. It is the ninth season episode, Vandalism. This is an episode that the industry calls a lower level episode. A lower-tier episode of a show is one that focuses primarily on supporting or supporting characters almost exclusively, usually with storylines that do not advance the overall narrative. At this point in the series, the very structure of the episode

became

one of the show's biggest problems.
Look, in this lower-level episode, every character behaves in, well, ways that seem a little disingenuous. And it may not be surprising to note that the head writer, well, this was only his third such credit. And it was the first episode directed by this man. Pam here is really the main focus. Someone destroys the mural and she goes hunting. This ends with a very un-Pam-ish confrontation at the end of the episode that isn't so much funny as it is weird. Daryl becomes a secondary focus. He's sick of having to deal with Jim being lazy. But is that how you would describe Jim?
I bet the answer is no. But it does create conflict. And Angela is having a birthday party with the senator, arguing with Oscar along the way and then being saved by Kevin. This episode is not only usually unfunny. It often borders on the surreal, like a series of deleted scenes or ideas stitched together to create a story, almost as if the budget had run out and they had to work with what they had. The problem here is that when Michael left The Office, the show made a serious mistake. Instead of trying to replace his presence, they began to rotate new presences.
It's not just that Michael was a great character. It's just that he was the main character. And his presence cemented the narrative and structure of the show. When he was gone and that presence wasn't filled, the show

became

incredibly unfocused. As a result, each episode was forced to become a lower-level episode, a style usually relegated to filler episodes of larger seasons of serialized shows. So in turn, what Vandalism represents is filler that should have been optional, not necessary, not to mention that this episode takes the Looney Tunes approach that the show veered into here. (SINGING) Here I am, signed, sealed, delivered.
I'm yours. Get the Girl – This season eight episode is the lowest-rated Office episode in the entire series. This episode represents almost everything that's wrong with The Office when it's not at its peak. This episode is what some call a road episode. It's an episode of a series that travels outside its normal setting, a fancy TV phrase that really means TV road trip. What really went wrong with The Office toward the end, and even in its failed spinoff episodes like The Farm, is tonality—more concisely, inconsistency in tonality. As The Office lost focus, so did its tone.
While the show has always flirted with the absurd, many of the last two seasons are pure slapstick, The Office meets Looney Tunes. In Get the Girl, we see a recurrence of things The Office had already done better, literally, a poor performance review... I saw it... a newcomer taking over someone's desk... I saw it... and potentially a job... seen as good-- and a trip of love, also seen as that. Except here, this B story does all of that worse and more absurdly than the show has in the past, well, except for that road trip, because the most important thing is that that B story clashes dramatically in tone with its A or main story, Andy goes to secure his love with Erin.
These are two different episodes from two different seasons of a show crammed together. And it doesn't work either. The full circle of Andy Bernard's Flanderization comes to a head here, as his plot sees him singing, loving with a heavy hand, and arriving at some of the most uncomfortable scenes in the show's history - a culmination, indeed, of a story , Erin and Andy, That didn't work out well for almost two full seasons. And yet here it is doubled down, again, in the harshest way possible, without subtlety and, believe me, with little humor. All of this is interspersed with the pure and utter insanity of that B-story.
This episode plays like someone punching you in the face and giving you cake between each punch. If you're going to try to create emotional weight, you can't lift that weight every three minutes and expect it to still be there when the audience returns. As in life, emotions are fleeting. And if you get too distracted, well, the moment is gone and so is the excitement. Hey guys, listen up. Michael is on the roof and acting strange. As you all know, I love The Office. And I don't really hate the last two seasons. But it's interesting that the 15 lowest-rated

office

episodes only include one that comes from another season besides the last two.
For me, The Office is a lesson in what it means to lose sight of the idea, to return to that transience. When you do it for an episode or a moment, like Mafia, it's fine as long as you get that line of thought back. Below Deck Episodes, Road Episodes, and even Bottle Episodes make up the final seasons of a lot of sitcoms. Watch Family Guy. Every other episode is a special now, South Park is suddenly playing with serialization, and the list goes on and on. When you start using new ideas as a crutch, rather than a complement, that's the moment your show ends, whether you keep making episodes or not, whether those new ideas are characters, love lines, or specials.
So the next time you write something, or better yet, watch something, ask yourself this. Can you describe what's happening on the screen the same way you would describe the show to your friends if you recommended it to them? And if the answer is no, how long ago was that show or movie series the way you used to describe it? If you can't answer the second question, maybe it's time to turn off the TV because someone somewhere has lost sight of their Michael Scott. It will feel so good to get this off my chest. Well guys, that's all for this episode of Nerdstalgic.
As always, if you enjoyed the video, hit the Like button below. If you haven't done so yet, click Subscribe so you don't miss anything I upload here on this channel. Obviously, I'm back again. Sorry for the brief pause. If you're interested in those four or five Office videos I already made, they'll probably be on the final screen here. But they are definitely on my channel. I have a full Office suite. You can see all those videos there. I talk about a lot of the episodes I talked about here, like the failed Office spin-off, why they changed Michael Scott, how they changed Andy Bernard, all that good stuff.
So you can find them on this channel. And on your screen right now are maybe two of those exact videos. And I hope to see you in the next one.

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