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How The Pros Play Blues (it's more simple than you think)

Apr 12, 2024
So when we learn to

play

the guitar, sometimes it can be difficult to feel like we are progressing and moving to the next level. Some people call that getting stuck, and sometimes it can be helpful to learn what the difference is. help you get to the next level and I was

think

ing about this recently so reach out to my friend Cory Kilio who is one of the best guitarists. I know Cory is an incredibly versatile guitarist, he can work in almost any style out there, eh, but. He is particularly a great

blues

, fusion and funk

play

er so I decided to pick his brain on what makes a great

blues

guitarist as the blues is one of those things that are so

simple

to learn but difficult to master, almost everyone.
how the pros play blues it s more simple than you think
We start somewhere in the blues. on guitar, but very few of us get to the point where we play real, great-sounding blues, and uh, Cory is one of those guys. Now Cory has a course called blues guitar which I will have linked in the description box. Next, where he takes a lot of the concepts we talked about in our discussion and goes really deep, there are a ton of backing tracks that he made specifically for that course, and I highly recommend it. I reviewed it earlier this week and it's really great, so you can get a special discount on Cory's course through the link in the description without further ado.
how the pros play blues it s more simple than you think

More Interesting Facts About,

how the pros play blues it s more simple than you think...

Here's my chat with Corey. Kilio Blues guitar is one of those things that most people start with, at least with electric guitar, but to learn. The past is very difficult, well, it's the best Gateway because we've learned that we have this 12-bar progression with three chords and this pentatonic scale fits on it like a key in a lock, you know, and we start making music and it plays. Well, if we break it down into the weekend warrior type player or the person who really embodies the spirit of the Blues, it all comes down to really understanding that 12 Bar form and living in it, and I know that sounds really elemental and level of bass, but can you do it yourself with a guitar?
how the pros play blues it s more simple than you think
You know, we see those. Did you ever see that video of Stevie Rayvon playing an acoustic boom like that? That's blues to me because I could be full of it all, yeah, so fast. He plays, but he is in the pocket, in the form and he has an incredible feeling and he has it because it is a language that he cannot forget. Okay, so how do we start down that path? So, the way I would do it. Starting down that path is really making sure you understand that 12-bar form, not just playing it, but how to play it anywhere on the guitar and in different ways, playing a blues and a two, three, four, so when you're doing that kind.
how the pros play blues it s more simple than you think
Hopefully you can imagine a band in there too because I'm making all this movement happen and that comes as a couple of notches on the blues dial once you learn maybe that or maybe those kind of moves, you know that kind of thing. That's a place to start: understand bar 12 and then start adding as many inversions of chords I was playing as you can. So what are some things that bother you when you hear someone play some kind of blues tropes, some cliches or some stereotypical things and how players stay away from those things, it's like when your kid is learning to talk and they just starts spouting all these phrases that they don't like, they really have a connection, that's what a lot of us do. when we start learning it's like and it sounds like some kind of disjointed noodle and it doesn't have to be like that if you break it down and do one, two, three, 4, take a metronome here on my phone, real slow, like 50 I have it at 54 and those are my Beats two and four so I'm going to one 2 three 4 now I was just playing Rifts there but they were all in time so we have this backbone of time in some kind of feel so when you sit down to grab your guitar and you want to play your Blues Licks, try to set some kind of tempo, so one thing that I also noticed a lot that I see with Blu's guitar is that a lot of players start with that minor pentatonic box shape where blues shape, already you know, this thing here it becomes very easy for people to just mindlessly fiddle around without saying anything and one of my favorite things that the truly great blues musicians do is take those five notes or those six notes and make incredibly compelling songs. and interesting lines and phrases without sounding like Nally, so what's your perspective on that?
I'm totally with you. You know, put a little rhythm behind what you're going to play like we talked about and limit yourself because sometimes what happens with players is they have this. and they

think

they have to use everything all the time, you know you don't have to use every word in the dictionary to make a sentence, limit yourself to sets of strings, maybe strings two and three, one and two, three and four, two and three. uh a c a d an E and A G, so for one, two, three went up to the first one, don't sue me for that one and you'll see I'll go down to four because I'll start bringing one. rope at a time, but only in small sets because that handcuffs me on purpose, so I don't know, you know, because no one really wants to hear that, they want to listen, limit yourself on purpose because what's safer than saying the same four notes? over and over not much, but it works a lot, so one last question: to what extent do you rely on muscle memory, like feeling the Lick in your hand or feeling the phrase in your hand versus hearing what you want to play and do? that comes out well on the guitar, I used to be an anti-muscle memory person, but there is a level of physical practice that I would avoid because I would just get bored, but I changed my tone a little when I started studying this great instructor, the jazz pianist , Kenny Werner, and Kenny relies on muscle memory and once that muscle memory is there, then you have this

more

emotional connection that you can generate and that's what I think the greats, all the kings.
We've heard, you know, Al Collins, all those guys who played so simply but embodied it so much that it didn't sound like a drill or a rep because their muscle memory knew where it was, but they just searched. I figured it out and I figured it out once they were in it, so I went back to like, okay, let me learn something really well physically that way I can make music with it later, but we say everything you know, it sounds. like we're falling, I mean, one could perceive that we're saying, you know, if you're not doing all these things, you're less than that, it's not true what we're talking about.
You know, I always use the equivalent, it's like music is a jungle and this is your machete. You know what I mean and you have to hit all the things to start building confidence and developing musicality and it's. It's an upward climb that I'm certainly still on um and so I want to qualify that as saying, look, we're talking about all these things that you need to do or pay attention to and then if you're not doing it. You might say, Well, I suck, I'm going to stop playing, no, keep going because you're going to be in the seats where we're talking, we're talking about these things, yeah, and this is all something that the big boys figured out.
It's also like they weren't just born Stevie Rayon or Jimmy HRI or Albert King or anyone else. They developed this and developed their voice over years when they maybe didn't work on these particular things. I don't know if BB King was sitting down. there with a metronome on the two and four notating these phrases, but he spent years and years internalizing and listening to and playing music with other musicians and learning and putting these concepts in his hands and that's just what we're doing now. You know why we have these methods like playing with a metronome or using guitar courses.
You know a lot about someone like BB King. Learning from him was on-the-job training. You know, and that was very common. So what do I mean by that? there was music five nights a week in bars and pubs and things that were probably blues or R&B in nature or jazz, so there was a lot to learn every night and it would really improve your playing there. Unfortunately, it's no longer commonplace, so I hope people like it and you can help a player progress. Yes, absolutely, so there you have it. I hope you found that discussion useful.
Subscribe to Cory's channel linked below if you enjoyed what we talked about here. a whole series of videos that talk about many of these concepts and don't forget to check out his blues guitar for yourself. The course link is in the description. You can get a special discount there and make sure to subscribe here according to my analysis 60% of people who watch this channel regularly are not subscribed, it really helps the channel when you do and you can also watch some of my video courses there If you are interested, my name is rat sha thank you very much for watching and see you next time

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