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How to Sew Flying Geese Six Ways

Feb 23, 2022
a unit of

flying

geese

is a very fundamental element you will find in almost any quilt it is a very consistent size a unit of

flying

geese

is al

ways

twice as wide as it is tall the goose has and then it has the sky so in this one our goose it's blue, the sky is white here, the goose is white and the sky is pink, so no matter where you put a flashy color or a light color or your different colors, it doesn't matter, the goose al

ways

stays in the middle and the sky it's always outside because the goose is flying through the sky geese are usually placed in pairs but another place you can find flying geese that you don't realize is if you're looking at a star block so if you have a center then you've got your pieces around the outside edge here you can see you're starting to get a star point out of that and that's using that same flying geese block just a little bit differently so take a look look at your quilts for things like that the other thing you might want to realize or learn is that there are a number of different ways to make flying geese in fact there are a myriad of ways you can make flying geese and let's see six of them today so we have our standard style of flying geese and this is a zero waste flip and stitch method of making flying geese we have used quilt Q we have done four at a time we have used the half square triangle rules and a quarter square to make this set this set this is a one cm-- just a block of flying geese which is cool and then these twelve flying geese here were just made from three strips of fabric so let's take a look at all those different styles and I invite you to try them all now when you are making your flying geese blocks from a traditional point of view or in a traditional way you don't need to cut all the geese s in triangles you can start with a simple rectangle which is very very easy so here I have my pieces so I have the geese and then I have the sky and for each goose you need t wo sky blocks and to get the right size no you can just say ok this is a three by six finish so I need it to be six and a half by three and a half which would make sense on a regular quilt block because that would be so a half inch would a seam allowance on each right side so six inches and a quarter inch here and a quarter inch here would be six and a half three inches and a quarter here in a quarter here is three and a half and that works on a block square but it doesn't work for flying geese because we're working with triangles so let me put this aside for a second and let me show you the difference so if this is my block with just a quarter inch added on each side and my sky pieces, which has a quarter inch added on both sides what you'll get is this great little unit when you're done and that looks really cool but let's take a look for a second a little closer when you're done with your block you should have some margin quarter inch seam all the way and when you look at this one let me use my ruler here and I'm going to set it to a quarter inch and I don't know if you can see but the toe of my goose down is cutting all the way off. off because there is no quarter inch seam allowance here and here is another example this little piece is sized exactly to the finish and you can probably see there that there is a bit of nose exposed so it would be encapsulated in the allowance seam allowances so it's not ideal so keep in mind you can't just add your seam allowances to the views now the way you're going to calculate your fabric size you need is to just take your final size if you want that your finished goose will be six inches by three inches after it's all sewn, not including seam allowances, the formula you'll use is to add one and a quarter inches to the width and seven eighths to the final size, so that would be seven and a quarter before his own or should say this one is seven and a quarter inches and this one is three and seven eighths of an inch tall and the heavens are just three and seven eighths times three and seven eighths and that will give you the goose of size t finished six by three, so again no matter what size flying geese unit you want to make, whether it's small or you want it to be large, you'll add an inch and a quarter to the final measurement for width and then 7/ 8 to the desired final size for the height so that's always consistent no matter what size you end up with now let's move on to setting up our sky units for the sky as we don't need to cut the triangles ahead of time and let's get to work . with the rectangles all we're going to do is place our sky on one side and we're going to stitch and then we'll stitch the other side so I need two sky units and what I'm going to want to do is draw a corner seam line myself to corner and to do this I'm going to take my ruler just lay, just a hair to that side of my corners because I know the weight of the pen takes some distance and I'm using a pen you probably don't want to do this on your quilt it I'm doing so you can see what I've done here so again I'm just a hair's breadth from that side of the ruler side of my corners because that way the width of the pen tip will still go from corner to corner and now I have my corners marked so that when we get this to the sewing machine you'll position it so the sky comes up to the edge on one side of the goose rectangle and we're going to sew just below this line but again keep our stitches just a thread with only on that side of the line so that when we turn it over we have it in the right place and the reason we do that is because the thickness of the thread and the actual thickness of the fabric takes up space when you turn it over to this, so if we were to sew right on this line or maybe even this way a little t That would mean that our seam allowance, the amount that we're taking off of our part of the sky, would be too much and it wouldn't end up fitting, like so that we're going to sew this up, then we can trim our seam allowance and we'll press . open it up and then we'll repeat with the other side and then we're left with a flying goose unit so we're going to do that we're all set up too so our first style of flying geese the flip stitch method I've got my machine threaded I've got it threaded with a dark color, so it is easy to see.
how to sew flying geese six ways
I am not at all suggesting that you should wear a very dark color with light fabrics, so it is for visual purposes only. I have all my fabric for my skies marked with a diagonal line and I marked it on the back or the wrong side of the fabric because we will be sewing right sides together when we are making our pieces so we also have our goose pieces here You probably also keep in mind that I have the Studio Grid Glider on my machine and this is a fabulous tool that is very slippery on the surface so it's great for free motion work.
how to sew flying geese six ways

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how to sew flying geese six ways...

I also have my extension table here so I have a nice platform now. I'm not doing free motion, but this is perfect to leave on even when you're sewing. there's a cutout for your feed so you're not hampered at all but there are great reference lines that really help us when we're working with splices and also any kind of diagonal or triangles so this line down here is my Center needle position and then I have a quarter inch to the left and a quarter inch to the right and then there is a center needle position or a needle position line back here which can also be very helpful and i have this on my machine so i can use these aids now another thing i have in my seam areas on one side of my machine i have my wool pressure pad and my panasonic cordless iron so i can iron my seams as i go and then on the other side I have my quilters select a 12 by 18 inch rotary mat for It's a smaller mat and then on the other side of my machine I have a rotary cut set up with my Quilter Select turntable and I have a small one, it's 18 by 12 and then I have my 3 by 12 inch cooler.
how to sew flying geese six ways
I select the ruler and my quilter selects the rotary cutter so I can trim as I go along and I don't have to interrupt my process to take care of those things so let's take our first goose down and I'm going to take just one piece one sky and we're going to sew from corner to corner and I'm going to prefer to be within the seam allowance now I have a total of three geese that I want to do today and we're going to do this piece so we're going to do the next goose down and then the next goose up so we're going to stitch them together multiple units and sewing them together is called chain splicing, so it's a really convenient and time-saving way to put all the pieces together, okay? now i like to eat work with my needle down and what that will do for you when you sew is it gives you a spo So if you get stopped don't go off your line because we really want our lines to be straight and i'm trying to make sure that my tip is on my center line and down there and that will help ensure that I have a straight line so now that I'm at the end of that one I'm going to go find my next goose make sure my right side is up and then put the next one down so you've probably noticed that we're basically sewing from the center of our goose piece to the outside corner and this will end up being the tip or the nose of our goose so it's very very easy to do and I didn't cut the thread I'm just sewing my next unit and this is giving me that chain splice that to beat the eighth ok now I'll stop here and take my next piece and put the next one on and then we're off Now this pin is the friction feather and that will come off with the heat of an iron but if you are using fabrics like batik and are drawing on the front side or right side of the fabric then you might want to try Not that because sometimes some fabrics have a kind of primer that prevents it from rubbing off, it can darken to white and if you notice I have just a little bit of distance here between my drawn line, now I'm going to move on. and separate them.
how to sew flying geese six ways
I don't need them hooked to press them. Let me show you a very quick tip on how to iron your different units so that when you're ironing you want to press so press don't iron but press and I'm pressing. first and this is setting that seam and it helps heat up the fabric and then it's going to want to turn so that's nice that's pretty nice so basically I'm going to press it and if I change my iron and move it back and forth, in I'm actually pulling it up so there isn't that pressure there what we don't want to do is push and push the fabric because being fair we could skew them and then they won't be they won't be the shape anymore they won't be straight another thing you might notice is that when we're going to cut the seam allowance here I'm just going to use my rotary cutting ruler and my rotary cutter and just trim that you can also use scissors because it doesn't really matter if this is straight or not because it's on the seam allowance and if it's not perfect that's ok but don't get too close to the seam line because then it might come off so I'm going to trim it now if this seems like a lot of waste which it does to me there is a very very easy way to create additional units I give them that so watch our video on squaring triangles to see how it's done so I'm going to press up the rest of these units and trim them and then I'll be right back as well as being very mindful not to stretch the seams when I pressed these units I also pressed them and when you're doing geese you want to do this you want to press the seam skyward away from the goose and the reason for that is when we come back with the other hand you're going to end up with multiple layers of fabric here and actually , you're going to end up with six layers of fabric right at this point, so it would be really hard to force the stitch to be nice and crisp. if it was trying to fold in on itself so press those seams up to the sky now I'm taking this next piece and over to the other side and lining it up and again it will meet in the same top center position as the last one and then we're going to sew this piece of the sky down and again this side.
Now I'm going to vent this side of our seam allowance. It's still in the seam allowance, but this time it's in this direction and then I'll keep my kind of tip. lined up with this quarter inch marker down here on my grid slider and I have my needle down turned on so now we're ready for the next piece and I'll just grab the next one and place it and make sure that be in place and then we'll sew that seam making a flying geese unit if we act allied very very simple to do and if you work with rectangles and squares like this it's not as stretchy as working with a triangle so as I mentioned, now it's bias so you have to be careful when you press it just think about how stretchy it would be to sew if this was cut here and had a triangle it could be very very stretchy so every time you sew on the bias you should be careful what you can doTo help prevent any stretching when you're sewing on your quilt, whether it's straight or gray or definitely on the bias, first, before you cut the fabric, spray it well with the best press or other type of fabric reinforcement.
I like the press better because it's not really a starch alternative to starch it doesn't contain any plant based materials or sugars so it won't attract bugs which I find very very valuable and then I keep a little bottle of that in my too ironing station here by my machine so as I go I can press those so I'm going to trim these in between cutting my chain pieces and then I'll go and press them now we have our three units of flying geese finished so this is a sky which is a sky which is a goose when you put them together when you put those pieces together they create a unit so we have them and now we can sew them together no matter what style of method you use to make your units of geese.
Sewing a single goose to another goose is pretty much the same way we're going to stack them like we're going to do here, so what we want to do, our goal is for the seam allowance to come and just kiss the toe of our goose, we don't want that the thread goes into or the seam goes into the goose down and we really don't want to sew right into the toe of that goose down even though while sewing it feels absolutely perfect but remember the actual thickness of the fabric and thread when turning and then turning press it would actually cut off the toe of our goose down so what we want to do is stitch right towards the seam assignment of that intersection and if we look at it from the back you'll see our little X here this is the toe of our goose down we're going to sew and aim just above that when we put them together when you're putting your geese together you can attach very easily use quick quilt clips or I like to use my glue stick and this is a call to select stick of glue and all I'm going to do is just make a little fold right there as far as where my center is and I'm going to put a dab of glue because I have to get the glue out a little bit right at the seam allowance that I'm not going to sew there I'm going to sew that it's just going to be encased in my seam allowance and I think it would probably be easier if I did it this way and then I can see now I'm going to line up that little crease there's my point and there's my crease and I'll just slide up and just put my finger there and hold that just for a second it's a quick dry glue that will wash off but hold put that spot in place now if you're not comfortable doing your geese and it's your first time you can always put some glue in the corners and make it stay in place and back on this side and then that will just help keep it there now of course you can use pins you can use quick clips whatever you want to do , yes I just like to use the glue stick because for me, the pins tend to get distorted when I put them right.
I am sewing with the goose side up. Let me cut this little thread to make it easier for you to see. I'm going to sew with this facing up and just aim on the seam allowance side of that intersection to tell. where i want to sell and once you've made a couple it won't be a big deal you'll be used to it now that we're sewing I'm actually running my fabric pretty much a dotted line and just inside if this is also a foot of a quarter inch and the distance from the edge of this foot to the needle is a quarter inch i have ac i finally moved my needle over a little mark and that will help give me that scant quarter inch even though i'm lining up here and here already that my needle is about a pinch it's a scant quarter inch if you want to test that go ahead but do a hand test to make sure you're not going to impact that but with the needle it's always a hard way to start stitching to the day breaking a needle. from snuggled under there i'm going to take this and make sure it's nice and smooth and then we can start again oh okay let's take a look at that my seam is just a hair above my intersection and when i open it looks very well look that's absolutely wonderful so let me press that when you press this and it comes and blends perfectly it's like a little gift you just opened it's so much fun when you press it although remember that you want the stitching is going to want to go naturally towards the smaller resistance so I pressed the seam allowance at the top of the goose down if we tried to fold it this way we have those six layers of fabric and they don't want to go that way so we would be fighting and there's no need to fight let me take my next unit now and I'm going to press it with my fingers and make a little crease here so I can see it and everything.
I make my glue stick again and give it a little touch there and I'll put a little touch in each corner because it worked so well having those corners line up and then I'm going to see where my crease is and then slide it up to match my seam allowance press a little bit to hold it and then I'm going to align that corner and now we're going to align this corner nicely which looks like it's just press a little bit and now they're ready to sew and again we're going to get right into the seam allowance to the and in this case to the right of that intersection to make our goose toe now I'm going to be smart this time and before I get hung up on it I'm just going to make sure that seam allowance is down and I don't have to fight with it and then As soon as I'm done I'll go back to the iron and give it some better pressure and some pressure and my unit will look absolutely wonderful.
We had another happy day. beautifully and since we took the time to press our finger on our goose to know where the point on the bottom of the goose was going to line up the block, the block we've made is nice and square. I don't see anywhere. that I need to go and trim this or make it consistent we have our quarter inch when we sew our quarter inch you'll see it's just going to tip the little ring on that goose down and then I still have my quarter inch up here on the nose so this goes to work absolutely perfect.
Another style of flying geese units is done using the a Q qui. lt and the quilt a Q is a cutting system that uses dyes and a machine to cut the pieces absolutely perfectly and you'll notice there's a couple of different dyes I have here and when you cut the pieces you'll notice the triangles have their corners cut off which which is perfect because then you don't have cutouts when you finish sewing them and you press them with you so it has a really nice clean finish if you have a nice logo you probably got the flying geese Lock in with your go big if you don't have a go big this is available to buy alone and it's made from the goose down with two pieces of heaven and one thing that's absolutely fabulous about using a Q quilt system is that not only are its the pieces cut exactly every time, which is fabulous, it's more fast but it can also cut through six layers of quilting cotton at a time so it's very very fast and efficient if you don't have the flying geese block if you have the bucket system which it comes in many different nt sizes but all the basic cubes have the pieces you need for a flying goose unit so the flying goose is made up of the half square triangle that is your goose and one quarter square and two triangles of a quarter square which is your sky so you would need one half square triangle for every two quarter square triangles which is what we have here so you could get two geese and four skies with one pass and one layer of fabric but again you can put up to six layers of fabric so it's really very efficient in Now it's time this is the fourth square of one of my larger cube sets but I just wanted you to see how it cuts , so I have my piece of fabric and then that's all the waste there is and then you're left with these perfectly cut pieces and that's pretty, that's great.
I love using my aqua quilt, ok again each basic cube has six, nine, eight, ten and twelve and they all have these pieces or you could use the whole unit. die for flying geese, so when these go together, let me put this aside. I do note that I have a couple of different sizes here to make up my flying geese units, so I would need two skies each here and when I put them together. if you notice that the ends down here meet exactly and we can sew our quarter inch and we're going to basically go from one point to another that would take care of one side and press it back, then we'd sew the other one so we go to the machine.
I'll show you how that's done now. Let's take a look at joining the flying Gatien we cut out using the Accu quilt so again the big one is our goose and let's take a sky piece right sides together on the align that bottom corner and the bottom edge and of course to along this outer edge and we're going to sew our quarter inch all the way so let's put our line at our quarter inch mark there and just sew and then as soon as you get to this add one since I stopped with the needle down My machine foot will automatically come up and just slide the next piece in and again this is called chain splicing and then we'll get our next piece and we'll also do three of these now this is so easy to do and the cool thing it's you don't have to cut off dog ears which is so nice not having to deal with that it's like having a party you do all the work to get ready for the party and then everyone leaves go. i have to clean up no one likes to trim the snippet after you're done it's nice to have all that business taking care of it before you even get there so now i'm going to trim the thread in the middle and then press so again I'm going to place the seam first and then turn it and press it now we're ready to sew the other side so we're going to take this and we're going to join the right sides together now we're lining up with this other corner down here and lining it up and you'll notice when we fold this open there was no dog ears to trim the only thing we're going to trim if you want and you don't even have to is this little peek at the top okay so there's one piece and now we'll take our next right side unit together using white fabric on white, sometimes it's a little harder to tell which is the right side, but if you hold it up to the light a lot of times, that will give you the information you're looking for and then the last one.
Again, all right sides together by matching this corner. It's a lot of fun to see how these pieces come together so well. There are our units. to just cut off his little nose i guess that would be a bad sounding pick isn't it cool so now we have those threads and i don't know what you do in your sewing room but i have a right to my feet i have a little trash can for my Threads can get into that as I trim them so we're going to g Push a big advantage of using your cuticle to cut the pieces that are precision cut and then as long as you're sewing an even quarter inch or quarter inch seam sparse, then you should end up with a perfect quarter inch up. here and then your unit should be the right size so you're finishing it's six and a half inches that way and it's three and a half inches this way so no trimming or aligning my little pieces are ready to use this method making flying geese is really a lot of fun and one thing that is really amazing is that while doing this you will end up with four flying geese for every square you have here in this case the white is going to be our goose and the pink is going to be our sky and we need a big square for our goose and we need four squares for our sky so let me show you how to set them up because we need to mark them we are going to mark this very similar to how we did in our first example of our flyi ng geese I am marking a line from corner to corner on our goose Sorry to our heaven and I'm just trying to stay inside that corner so my feather width still hits corner, whoops from corner to corner and the last one here so you're going to fit all four corners and when we sew this we're not going to sew on this line but this is a reference line because what we're going to do is take our big square and place one of our sky pieces in one corner and then take another and place it in the opposite corner and we can pin them together so they don't move and we're going to sew a quarter inch of this line on this side and then on this side as well and we're going to finish cutting on that line so that our seam allowance is right on either side of that and then we're going to press and go to step two that I'm going to show you on the machine I like to share with you this book it's called the all-in-one quilters reference i recently discovered. do it myself I don't know how I missed it all these years, but it's really fabulous.
Here you'll find resources on quilt sizes, yardage, yardage you need for backings, all kinds of different things, and when you're adding. things at different points measurements for blocks and how to make them and here on pages 50 and 51 there are math charts for you to follow one is for our standard style withthe one where we start making our geese and it tells you what size a piece to cut for our finished unit so the size of the goose and the size of your sky then on this page this is for the flying geese to finish four at a time and then gives the reference of what sizes you should cut to get the desired unit, so this book is truly amazing.
I was very excited that it had information of two flying geese in there but again that's not all there's just tons of information and it's not written in paragraph form it's wrong and dirty the information you need to get to this quickly is a lot of fun it gives us for flying geese in a configuration here so we have in this case our goose is white and our sky is pink which we have drawn from corner to corner on all four of our sky pieces and lined up our squares in the corners on the opposite side and then you can nail now. and i tend to wrinkle the fabric and then i'm stressing the fabric so this is the selected quilt or glue stick and i'm just passing it you can see the line i drew from the back so i'm on the side right of the fabric because I drew the line on the wrong side of the fabric and that gives me the ability to anchor it in place without having to pin it and I know it's not going anywhere now what I want what I do is sew a quarter inch on each side I have my quarter inch foot which is a quarter inch to this right side so I'm going to line that up with my foot so it's right on the edge and then I'm going to sew all the way down and then turn and come back up the other side so this is really fun you do a lot more at the same time so it's a nice multitasking way to do your flying geese and it feels so good when you cut them up and then you end up with as many as you have now, but or I'm down here I stopped needle down and I'm just going to sew to the other side and it stops needle down and then I can sew the other side so now if I was doing more of this if I needed another set, I would chain a piece of them like we did the others but now what we're going to want to do is you can either take it to a rotary cutter or we can just take our scissors and just cut it in two halves now. when you're doing this, the math is a bit tricky.
Now let me talk about math for a minute if you have that reference book. it's great it tells you what size pieces you want but what really excites me is the flying geese time for the ruler and it's not a math ruler it lets you choose the size of the finished goose you want and shows you or flying unit of geese I should say and then it will allow you to line up the goose fabric and you just cut a square which shows and then it will show you the comparable or coordinating piece of sky that you need to cut so that's all you need to do it's really quite fabulous, It's alright, they're both under pressure, isn't it cute?
It looks like a little fox. I think if you put a little nose here in some little eyes, wouldn't it look like a little fox? so cute anyway so now we have this part and it's half of we have half of four geese here so we're going to take this and place it there and then we're going to do the same thing here and then we're going to sew one side and another one just like we did with our starter pieces so again i'm going to flip this over and just put little whoo dots on it and hold it in place again you can do whatever makes you happy this makes me happy it's faster and that glue washes out and dries very quickly and if i was sewing it which obviously i'm not today but if i were it wouldn't stick to my needle which i really appreciate as well so i always have that why my machine is fine, now we are going to come and we are going to sew our quarter inch and me.
I'm going to start over I'm in the pink back here and I'm going to sew all the way down and then I'm going to go ahead and chain the pieces together because that's a more efficient way to go and then I'm going to bring it here I'll take a couple of stitches in the middle and then when I come down here I can just do the same thing that I did before because remember this in the middle is our seam allowance so I can sew the end. and then flip it back and just sew the other side and I'm aiming for that line with the edge of my foot but since I've got my needle hit in one position then I'm sure I'll have that ant order just fine so now let's take our scissors and we'll cut out that drawn line we had and you can do as many of these as you want but you're out of time so if you need an odd number you'll end up with an extra mile you have to do one more otherwise you're ok so let's delete that ok they are nice and pressured. they look great, but now you'll see what we need to do to trim.
I have dog ears on three sides so they need to be cut to have a clean seam so you'll want to do this. on all three sides of all your geese and once they're all trimmed they're ready to assemble and it's not a bad idea to check that you're the right size you can measure them and make sure they're the size they need to be thought I'd show you one one more thing or to remind you of one more thing while I'm chaining this member we want our needle to come just inside the seam allowance side of that intersection and I'm stitching that up so I can see it and I know I'm hitting it correctly and that works now with this.
Since I have multiples, I was able to join two of the units and then another, so I chained them together and now we can go back and open it up, double check that we have a good intersection on our little units there and do this. I gave him a small tip. No, he's right there, but I'm happy enough with it. I'm not going to move that over one hair, so we just bring the other one together and sew it back together. i am using my needle down function. I am looking at the lines on my mat to help make sure I have it straight and in the correct position. flying geese piece if you want so let me push this and then we'll move on to our next one.
The technique we just finished doing for flying geese is a system that allows you to cut and set up the geese and the sky very quickly. Each flying geese unit is made up of a quarter square triangle which is the goose and two half square triangles which are the sky, these are rulers which are actually those measurements and have the markings on them which make the unit very, very simple and the size I'm using right now is four inches so that's the maximum size of four inches so let me put this aside and I'm going to start with my goose down okay I have my strip here and this is that these strips are actually cut to three inches and I'm going to take my ruler and I'm going to line up the edge of my strip with the three inch mark and you can see that that matches up very, very well and it doesn't come to a point, but shave that point and I'm going to use my rotary cutter and it just cuts that piece and that's wasteful and then you're going to either twist or cut with both hands so I'm going to come in from the other side and trim that way and there's my unit and that's something I like about this rotary cutter is that i can cut with either hand its left and right handed ok so now i'm going to do the same thing from the other side and just flip the ruler so i have my wide part on top and then i'm just going to cut so let's go a Keep going back and forth until we have everything we need to cut and I'm cutting two strips at a time so right now I have the least cut so that would be enough for six blocks and I'm going to stop. there right now and let's take a look at setting up our sky now with the sky we need to have the right sides of the fabric together and that's not the case with these guys it didn't matter because you flip this over it's the same this way it's same thing that way so there's no left or right or up or down with that but when we're working ing with sky units it's a little bit different so I'm going to go in here and align my ruler with the proper mark and I'm going to cut off the end and then I'm going to go in on the side and I'm going to trim that, then when I flip it over I can't just flip it over you see how it worked so we're going to have to flip it all the way around , does a reverse. messy so don't just flip don't flip flip that's better so now we're going to go back and we can do this side again and notice I just have a couple of fingers off the ruler over the surface here which helps to avoid slipping off so i trimmed them then i said flips over and i'm wrong turn the other flipped over it's ok so i'll continue to trim until i have enough. and actually i have enough well no that's 2 4 6 that's 2 4 1 2 3 4 so i need 2 more sets to finish my geese and just put it there and if you have your finger and a thumb on the map that helps prevent that from changing you and we'll do one more game but this is pretty handy because now you're going to get your tips cut off you know he's small he's got his tip here trimmed and he's ready to go so now we can take that and we'll put them with our geese and we'll have our flying geese unit, so let's get that over to the Machine.
Here are the pieces we cut out using the half square and the quarter. square triangle x' so we have our goose and then we have four of them and then we have four sets of sky and these were cut right sides together and so they're even so there's a left and there's a right and what I'm going to to do is split them into their left and right sides so that we know when we're working with one side, we can just grab that piece and we know it's facing the right direction, so I've got everything split.
I'll start by taking this one and flipping it right sides together and aligning the t. I lean down here and then that edge lines up there and then again I'm using that scant quarter inch and I'm lining up the edge of my fabric with my line of a quarter inch here in my matte stitch and we'll also do a chain stitch I'll take my next piece right side up and combine the right sky piece for our goose down and line that edge up and then stitch to change the keys all together and then we'll press and then we'll sew the other side, okay? now we're ready for the other side so these pieces are going to go in here now there's one thing i noticed i did but i didn't mention it to you because i didn't realize i did it so when i flip this.
I align this point down here because it's the smallest point, then I anchor my finger and rotate it into position, that's how I've been aligning it now just because it worked that way. I am using this dotted. line here for my quarter inch seam allowance now notice that it doesn't match my foot up here but I'm actually okay with it because I'm not I'm not even looking at the foot I'm looking at the reference marks on my mat so I'm going to flip it over let's make the bottom point match up Anchor our finger there as a pivot point okay and on the last one I take that combination of those endpoints and then pivot that all good that that's cool how that works because you don't really have much to trim here. and i have a bit to trim there but that was probably the fact that i didn't have the perfect seam allowance or maybe my finger slipped when i was cutting with that ruler but not much either way so now let's trim our ears of dog and this time we only have the two puppies to do per unit because that top is pretty good, now this is a very interesting way to do a whole flock of geese in one go.
I'm starting with three pieces of fabric I have two pieces of sky fabric and one piece of my goose fabric and we're going to cut simple pd strips and turn them into tons of flying geese all at the same time. Now I've done all three layers of my fabric and I've made a real straight edge here and I've used my 24 inch long ruler for that and again this is the quilt or select ruler I really like because it just doesn't slide now on the ruler there's a line of 45 degrees printed and I'm going to line that up with my straight cut edge here and then I'm just going to cut a bias line so I have my selvedge here so my straight green and my cross and then this is at 45 degrees and I'm going to change that and I'm going to cut myself a three inch strip and I think you would do this back and cut this piece that I just cut out.
You could also cut it into three-inch strips. You can see how once you have a game, we have all three layers of fabric. You can continue cutting as many as you need. I'm just going to show you one so you get an idea of ​​how it works now we're going to take this to the sewing machine and what we're going to do is we're going to stitch our pieces together so I'm going to sew my goose fabric flanked by my sky fabric on both sides. piece which is my goose down and then I have one of my white sky strips and I'm just lining those up that's going to sew my quarter inch ok there's that one and then we're going to do the other side and again we're going to go the right sides together with this one and we're going to sew it to the pink side okay and now we're going to sew this down and this will give us miles and miles of flying geese okay so now we're going to do something different here because we have so many seams and the way this ispresents instead of pressing in one direction we're actually going to need to press those seams open so don't press ENTER in a way that we want to press them open ok we have our strips stitched together and I carefully press my seam allowances open and be careful when you do it because remember this is all bias and we don't want it to stretch so now what we're going to do is cut this into smaller pieces and I'm going to use my smaller ruler, it's more convenient.
I'll start here so you can see this method a little better now man this is just great there's a lady called Mary Hickey and I saw her do it this way and it was absolutely fabulous so she must be an engineer of some sort. inch sections and that's perfect because this is the three by eighteen rule, sorry three by twelve, so I just lined that up with my raw edge and made sure I had the same line. You could use a dotted line or any reference line. but you want to make sure they are perpendicular and or your parallel edges of the ruler are lined up properly that way we get nice true cuts so let's see so far we have two three and again I love this ruler because it just grabs onto that fabric and does not slip I don't know if you've ever done that where you're cutting something that needs to be precise, then you get to the other end and it just comes off and then you don't have a precise cut at all looks like we're going to get two more out of this section so let's finish that and one plus I think it's enough to cheat so we'll get it right so I've got that and that so we've got seven units here. and then we're going to go and we're going to put them together and we're going to put them in order like this, they're going to let me move that around a little bit, so we're going to put them together like a Seminole unit would be, so we're going to go.
I'm going to put them together and then I'll show you what to do with them. We have all our pieces ready to go here and when we sew them we want to offset them a bit. I've got my quarter inch with the guide on and I'm going in. I put a little bit of glue right there at that intersection and then I'm done. i'm going to flip it over and line up the light and the dark and blend them together so the stitching stays together and now i can sew this now i'm going to do this in pairs because it's the same process from one to the other it's just a matter of sewing them all together .
I'm just going to sew one at a time keeping my seam allowance or the edge of my fabric right there on that dotted line so that's my seam allowance and my guy won the popup there. and on this bottom I just need to go over the seam allowance a little bit and then cut my thread and the next one I'll do the same thing you just need to start stitching right where this fabric starts or a little further on and that's a fine down stitch, it's going down a bit so let's match them up and then we'll stop right past that seam allowance and we've got one more to do and then we can just stitch them together and then when we go to press we want to make sure we press the seams open one more time instead of For one, one thing I learned from a girl, her name is Kate England, I may have taken a class from her when she came to our area.
The square square rulers that she was using are designed by Kay England. I really adore her but she taught me and we all that you don't necessarily have to push after every scene you did and go to the ironing board when it's time that's what I really prefer to do it's just in a group done and then i can compress so none of these seams interlock with each other so i'll go ahead and stitch all these little units together so i can take and just push the whole unit at once me and this is our last game so you can see that it's not really it takes a long time to attach and also gets a little bolder with my early gluing but if anything comes out now the yellow dries back to a light white color so you don't see it anyway but it will wash out but it's so fabulous and you'll notice I'm sewing right where I put it and it's not coming out or anything alright so now it's all done so now I'm going to press my seams open and trim all those ends of thread and press open , okay before I press them. open to make sure my glue doesn't stick, but if I leave the seams here, that would be kind of crazy. ends so the seam lines might open up but the sky pieces might lay flat so let me show you that so what I did first was I went into it. re and I just wanted to open that little bit of glue that we had right there holding it so now you can push it open right there perfect and then we come here and see how it wants to bend that way so hold it down and then just push that way and then when you press this everything will be perfectly flat so the same thing here I'm going to come over and push that to the other side so it's very very easy to release because only maybe a stitch a stitch and a half which is right there and then maybe this is going to be easier to open up that glue because I already had that open seam there we go so we tuck that in there and then we go down here and we're going to do the same thing this side goes that way and we go going to go ahead and do that for all the pieces and that will help it lay nice and flat so here we have our Seminole unit and we have the seams open and since we released the seam on the ends here you'll see everything lays nice and flat on th The front now we're going to need to cut them out so we're going to use our longer ruler this time and we're going to trim it down so that we have a quarter inch of this point because we need the seam allowance so I'm going to align the point with my quarter inch and over and over and I'm going to continue down to the end and then we'll trim this and then I'll flip it over okay I've got my quarter inch in there a quarter inch okay so let's get these guys out and then we'll shift them down and make sure about a quarter inch and a quarter inch and we're good so this is good to continue now all my scraps okay now what we're going to do is trim the center of the pink and go from corner to corner and line up our geese and then trim and I'm just going to do a little bit you'll notice I have the smallest ruler I'm going to do a little bit of time here so I can see what I'm doing and just line it up so Now or what we're going to want to do is just between and we're going to separate between each of our geese there and there's one unit up two units okay so from our three strips of fabric and we're working with three inch strips we have twelve units of geese which will finish at three for one and a half now this is a really fun way to make a flying geese unit it's a one seam flying goose and i saw it in one of jenny downes videos and it's made using a cake layers and charm squares so this is half a layer cake and to enchant squares of each layer cake you can't get two geese but you need to enchant squares for all the geese so keep that in mind if you are doing multiples so this goose piece here is five inches by 10 inches and the sky pieces are five by five so these are as easy as can be and this is a fun way to make a unit of flying geese and so let's take a look at that we're going to put together this this unit this is the one seam method so we have our two five inch squares and then the This piece is a five by ten and we're going to take this and fold it in half in a hamburger shape so it makes a five by five square and then we want to press this down with our fingers without stretching the fibers of the fabric that's really important and now I'm going to take this and here's the edge of the fold and I'm going to place it so that it's a quarter inch below the top of that square and it's not going to meet here at the bottom, but we're going to make it meet this side and be a quarter inch, so I'm going to line up my fabric on my mat and line that up at the quarter inch mark and then just make sure this part is right at the center needle position so now I'm going to take this and I'm going to line this part up and by the way, this is the right side, p so the right sides are together and then this piece that I'm going to place right sides together, line that up and then we're going to sew this edge, the fold is right there, we've got our quarter inch seam allowance tucked in there and we're just going to stitch that together and you'll notice on the back this is the goose hang it in there it's a loose goose and he's just hanging out and having fun hoping we'll get there instantly now that we've sewn that seam that can open up our pieces and we have the two sky pieces that have been sewn together with the goose piece sandwiched in the middle and it's going to open it up so that this intersection here where those pieces meet becomes the point so that it extends that out so that the edge bottom of your goose lines up with the bottom edge of your sky on both sides and then you've made a perfectly simple flying geese block with just one seam, so what are you going to do with your flock of flying geese? dores? you found one or two different ways that you think will really be your style of doing flying geese and i think you will agree that there are a few ways that if you only have a couple it makes sense if you have a few that you need to do or many or heaven sak it is a whole flock of geese the different styles actually lend themselves to the amount you're making too so I hope you enjoy making your own flock of flying geese for your next quilt project

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