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How to Quilt as you go: Make a quick table runner

Feb 23, 2022
Hi

quilt

ing friends, I'm Carolina Moore, your favorite sewing and

quilt

ing YouTuber. And I'm here today to teach you about an on-the-go quilting method. I'm going to walk you through how to

make

a

table

runner

quilt as you go along, and then you can totally adjust this method to do smaller things like placements. Or you can use this for larger things like quilts. I have absolutely made quilts on the go using the same method. We're just going to be small so we can get it all in today's video. I am using my Baby Lock Jubilant today. You see this machine in most of my quilting videos.
how to quilt as you go make a quick table runner
From time to time I bring out my aria baby lock. But I do a lot of what I do at the Baby Lock with glee because I want you to see that while the fancy machines with all the bells and whistles are really amazing and maybe have more bells and whistles... things they can do, and sometimes They can

make

sewing a bit easier with things like knee raises or buttons that do certain things, but much of the quilting is really accessible with a basic machine. The jubilant is a fairly basic machine. I have to lift to put foot with my hand.
how to quilt as you go make a quick table runner

More Interesting Facts About,

how to quilt as you go make a quick table runner...

There is no button to lift the presser foot, but it has a smaller throat and today we are going to make a

table

runner

. We're going to fit all of that into this smaller throat, so you can absolutely do a lot of quilting stuff with machines like the Baby Lock Jubilant and that's what I'm going to show you today with our quilts as you go. . Before we start, make sure you are subscribed and have "liked" this video. We want to make sure other people have a chance to see it too. And when you interact with it, you say to YouTube, "Hey, that's a good video, show it to other people." So go ahead and get that out of the way and let's get set up and get started.
how to quilt as you go make a quick table runner
Okay folks, let's talk about the materials we're using today. This is a half yard of backing fabric that is just regular quilting cotton. All the fabrics I'm using today are from Maureen Cracknell's Gloria line. So this is going to be my backing fabric. I like that it has a slightly larger print, but really, you can use just about any fabric you like as your backing fabric. So 100% cotton art gallery fabrics. This turns out to be Maureen Cracknell's Gloria. Then I took another four prints. You can see all four here. They all match my backing fabric so it all goes together, and I've cut three strips of each pattern.
how to quilt as you go make a quick table runner
Two of the strips are two and a half inches. And one of the strips is three and a half inches. You don't have to remember - you can cut the strips to the size you want. Just know that if you cut smaller strips, it will take longer to finish your table runner because you will need a lot more strips and it will take longer. And if you cut wider strips, they'll stick together faster, but won't look quite as intricate. So depending on what you want, and also if you have larger prints on your fabrics, you may want them to show more.
And I have mine two and a half and three and a half inches. You can make them any size you want. four and a half. You can do bigger. Minor. Totally fine. But remember that a quarter inch on each side, just like with regular piecing, will go for our seam allowance. So you want to make sure you have that quarter inch on each side for seam allowance. So if you cut a half inch strip, it's too small. Everything will be seam allowance. If you cut a one inch strip, it will only end up being half an inch on your finished project because half an inch will be the seam allowance.
Two and a half inch strips will end in two inches and three and a half inch strips will end in three inches. Makes sense? Let me know if it doesn't come down in the comments and I'll get back to you. IT'S OKAY. So we've got our back, we've got our strips now. We have some hitting. This is a wadding roll that already comes in a good size. You can take any batting and just cut it to the width you want. We're making a table runner here. This is an 18 inch roll of batting so this will be my table runner.
My table runner is going to be 18 inches. If you would like your table runner to be 15 inches, cut yours to 15 inches. If you want your table runner to be twelve inches, cut it to the size you want. That is the batting width you are going to use. And then whatever length you want for your table runner, I'm going to go ahead and use the entire length of my half yard of fabric. It's going to be about 40 inches, and I've already cut the selvage from the backing fabric because I'm working on a selvage quilt. And that's why he wanted to save those selvages.
This last supply isn't totally necessary, but I think it makes life a bit easier. And this is just a spray of spray. There are all kinds and there are a couple that I think are better than others. This purple can. This is the spray and the link. I think it's fabulous. 505 will be sold at many different quilt shops. 505 is also good. And there's a Dritz brand, Prym-Dritz, which is a green and yellow can. I like that one too. So those three brands are all the brands I use. Sulky has one too. I find it a little harder to find, but if you can find Sulky, his is great too and also pretty good for indoors when, you know, if you're doing this indoors.
So yes, the sulky brand, that one too. And it's cool. So I'm getting a few things out of the way so we can spray the space. I want to spray this base onto my backing fabric so it doesn't have a lot of change. We're going to do this with a normal foot, not a walking foot. If you have a moving foot for your machine, that's awesome. Grab it, use it. It will make life a little easier. But if you don't have a walking foot like I'm going to show you today, you'll still be fine. Everything's fine.
I'm going to extend this and smooth it out. And then I'm going to baste. Different people will give you different instructions on the best way to basting. Obviously, you want to spray the foundation in a well-ventilated area. I sprayed my bat. Some people prefer to spray on their fabric. You can try both and see which one works best for you. We're going to spray him. Press it down. Here we go. Okay, I'm going to cut this to the length of my backing piece. And to bring this batting in now, stop raising the batting and start raising the fabric at this point.
So I know this part has already been basted. And I'm going to do one more section, and after this, there will be one more. So this will only be done in three sections. It doesn't have to be perfect. We are definitely not trying to find a specific link. We just want them not to move under the presser foot of the machine. IT'S OKAY. Now this last one, if I get an overspray, I want it to spray on the batting, not the fabric. Here we go. And if you have wrinkles or creases, just go ahead and separate it.
It's almost like a velcro grip or hook and loop tape grip, so you just peel it off and put it back together. It's a bit like a removable sticker, you just don't want to remove it many times. So right now, I have a quarter-inch foot with a guide on my machine, and that's not going to work because that guide will hook all of my batting and that's going to make travel difficult. So I have a couple of options. You could go with your standard foot. This is an N foot. Depending on the make of the machine it will have a different name, but this is just your standard foot.
But, your seam is going to be larger than a quarter of an inch. It's not the end of the world. You will simply lose more fabric and more fabric will be needed to finish a project. I have a quarter inch foot here that doesn't have a guide, so I'm going to go with that. But if all you have is a standard foot, that's fine. It's nice to have a foot where you know the edge, you can just follow that edge. So even if you use this foot, it will still follow that edge because then you know your lines are straight.
Well, the last thing is to talk about our stitches. So the last thing we would talk about is the stitch length, and I'll just leave the stitch length where it already is on the machine. You don't have to worry about lengthening or shortening the stitch length for this technique. You can use your standard stitch length and there will be no stitch width. We're not doing a zigzag, we're just doing a straight stitch. Okay, I've rolled up this right side so it's a little bit out of my way and I'm going to start with my first strip here on the left.
If you'd like, before starting here, you can go ahead and make a few parallel lines with a fabric marker, such as a blue washable ink marker, so you'll have some guidelines in case the strips become twisted. I don't mind that a lot of my strips end up crooked. This is a table runner for my house and if it gets a little crooked, it's not a big deal. However, if it's important to you, this is the time you want to go ahead and draw some lines on your batting and that will give you an idea to keep everything in order.
So lay your strips on top of each other and I'm not a big sear but we've got a lot of layers here we've got these two strips plus the batting plus the backing. So I just want to add a couple of pins, especially since I haven't drawn those lines to give me an idea if I'm going skewed. (surprised) Hello cat! Thanks for joining! Here we go. Not today, friend. Thanks. And now I'm going to take this to my sewing machine, I've got this all rolled up, it's going to tuck right in there and I put my foot down and I'm going to sew with a quarter inch.
When I get to a pin, I'm just going to pick it up or move it. Here we go. And keep going. Hey, here we go, we've got our strips. They have been sewn all the way down, you can see on the back that there is a seam line right at the back. And now we can cut them out. And we can open this strip. Now there are a bunch of options on how to push this. If you have used 100% cotton batting like the one I have here, you can use an iron to iron it out. You can use a seam roller to press this down, or I'm just pressing it down with my finger here, kind of, like I'm folding origami paper.
So I press that and now I can grab another strip. Let's see, I'm going to do this. And we are going to do the same. Just place the strip right on top. Grab your pins. We are joining the right sides by lining up the edges. There we are. And the same, just take it under the sewing machine. And so with that quarter inch seam allowance. The same goes for the extra. Open it up and have it nice and flat. I haven't used my fourth color yet, but I don't want it to be one-two-three-four. How you make yours is completely up to you.
But I'll go ahead and use my first color again just to keep it interesting. And if it makes your life easier, you can cut the strip now. I mean, if it makes your life easier, you could already cut all your boats to 18 inches because we know that's how wide the table runner is. Or if you have chosen a different width, whatever you have chosen for your table runner. So let's move on. Pinning, adding strips, pinning, sewing, flipping, finger pressing or pressing however we want or want to keep going down to the 40 inch length of our table runner.
Alright, here we go. That's the last strip. Yeah, it's about a half inch left. I'm not going to worry about that. I'm going to end up trimming that down, so that's totally fine. Here we go. I finished all the strips for my table runner and now I have some decisions and options. I can leave it like this because it's fully padded. You can see the padding lines on the back. The padding is where the top layer is secured to the back layer via the middle layer, and that's what happened here. You can't see the seams on the top layer because it's tucked under on the inside.
But this is fully padded, so at this point we could just stitch it together and voila, it would be totally perfect. And that's actually what I'm going to do with this one. However, if you wish, you can add some extra quilt lines. You can add some extra parallel quilt lines. You can add some extra perpendicular quilt lines. You can add some hand quilting as some large hand quilting accents would be fabulous here and look great. I can't think of a fabric that wouldn't look great then, because I think it would look fabulous hand-quilted. I can go ahead and add it back later after linking it, because that's another option after you've linked it.
After you've joined your quilts, you can still add a few hand stitches if you like little-handed sewing accents. If you were doing this for something seasonal, like Easter or Christmas or a patriotic event, whatever event you're putting together a table runner for, you can add an applique on top of here and apply that on below. This is a fully padded base that you can now add other things to, or you can leave it as is. You have so many options once you have made this base. And really, you can whip this up in an hour or 90 minutes, depending on how fast you are.
And if you already have your strips cut and also the size you're using, your small strips will take a little longer, but you can get a lot of variety and interest with small strips. So there we go. All this is done. The last thing is to square it and link it. I have another video on tying quilts. I'm going to go ahead and link it here so you can see my linking video. I show you how to hand bind and machine bind both totallygood for this project if you want a manual binder, if you want a machine behind.
Both are great options, but you have to square it first. I'll

quick

ly show you how we're going to square this up so it's ready for binding. OK, so I have my mat. This isn't a huge mat, but it's okay and I'm going to line up my edges. My half yard was pretty square. You'll see that I have a lot of threads here at the beginning of my knitting or at the beginning of my stitching. It's okay. I'm not worried about that. Now I'm going to align this fold with a line on my mat. And I want to bring this up a bit.
Double check that my batting fits everything within these 18 inches. You can now trim as if you could make this a 16 inch wide table runner at this point. We go. And I'm going to bring my ruler and the smaller amount a little bit closer to me. Line this up with the lines on the mat. So with that, let me have a Spot on Dot. And there we go, that will help me see those lines in the no even better. There we are. And I'm going to carefully cut all my layers here. Here we go. I'm not going to deploy it yet.
Let's convert this to make it a little easier for me. Oh, that's going to be so much easier. IT'S OKAY. And on this side, I'm going to cut off a quarter of an inch. Just to be sure. That everything is inside and that the wadding extends to that edge. I'm going to cut this last and now. When I opened this up, it's nice and to the point. Now see here I have a sample batting so I have a couple of options I can trim this a quarter inch less and that will definitely cover that or if I know my binding will cover this which it will.
This is much less than a quarter of an inch. So my binding will totally cover that. I can leave that and have it covered with the binding. But both options are fine, either trim it a bit shorter or go ahead and add some binding as long as you know it will cover all of that. Now all I have to do is square up these side ends. And that's pretty easy because I can line this up with the mat and I can line that up with the mat. And so I can easily. Square off. Yes, and there we are.
And I can flip it over and do the same thing on the other side. This is lined up with a line on the mat which should also be lined up with a line on the mat. I see that my batting advantage is actually a bit further. So I want to make sure. That there is batting all the time. And there we go. All I have left on this table is to go ahead and add some binding or if I wanted to, yes I could add some hand stitching or appliqu├ęs or other decorative pieces. But it's that simple to assemble a quilt as you go down the table runner.
And now that you understand the process of how to quilt as you go, you can make it into quilts, which will take a little longer because they're a little bigger. But you can absolutely do this with quilts on your home sewing machine and quilt and put together a strappy quilted quilt at the same time. All your friends. If you enjoyed this video, I hope you'll give it a thumbs up. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Be sure to subscribe to this channel. There's a lot more fun on the way. Also, if you're new here, take a look.
I have many quilting videos with many different tips and techniques that can help you with your quilting. Thank you very much for looking, my friends. I'll see you here very soon. Goodbye for now.

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