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How to PROPERLY shift gears on a bicycle?

Jan 14, 2022
hello welcome to gremlin youtube channel and today i will talk about how to change gear on a bike which is something many experienced riders know and some inexperienced ones don't know and also this video might show some information that even experienced riders don't know i don't know or I don't know in all the details so I will create in the timeline of this video little chapters so you can see it in the timeline and jump to the parts that interest you so you don't have to go. through the whole conversation and let's get started the first thing i'm going to tell you is a shocking fact that you wouldn't believe pretty much every bike has only about 10 different gear ratios ok i'll put this in i don't need it right now ok what do I want to say with that? let's take a look at this bike this bike has three chainrings in the front and i think nine in the back one two three four five six is ​​ok and nine in the back and when bikes are sold they are sold as multiplying the number of chainrings in the front with the number of chainrings or sprockets in the rear so this bike would have like 27 speed well that's not really the case sounds good for marketing but it's not really the case because when you use a combination of the largest chainring in the front with the largest chainring in the rear you get about the same gear ratio.
how to properly shift gears on a bicycle
I'll put a link to my article that explains gear ratios and how hard it is to row, basically, to put it simply, I'll put that article in the description of this video anyway. ok but the same gear ratio can be achieved if you put the chain on the smallest of the three chainrings in the front and also the smallest of the nine chainrings in the rear you have similar difficulty turning the chainrings pedals when going with uh b and similar speed so you don't have the full number of combinations available to give you different gear ratios there might be a slight difference but it's not really relevant another thing to consider why I chose this example is if you want to achieve that kind of gear ratio in both of the examples i just said the chain would be at a very severe angle from the inside of the bike to the full outside or if we're on the larger chainring on the front and the larger on the rear then it goes the other way, but it's at as wide an angle as possible, which isn't very good because it causes excessive chain wear and the chainring warps as well.
how to properly shift gears on a bicycle

More Interesting Facts About,

how to properly shift gears on a bicycle...

Wear excessively and your chain is more likely to jump or come off the chain or rear sprocket when riding that way, especially in force and if you're riding rough terrain, the best way to achieve that gear ratio It is on a bike with three front training to put the chain on the mid chainring in the front and choose one of the mid chain rings in the rear that gives the closest gear ratio you want compared to the examples I I have given now trying to explain this, it is very simple when you understand it, but the first time this was explained to me.
how to properly shift gears on a bicycle
I had to sit and think about it and then test it on my bike at the time. I had the 3.3 times 6 drivetrain and even that was still confusing but what I'm explaining is the same way. three times 11 or 2 times 11 or 2 times 12 with newer shimano drivetrains uh my mtb and also for fuel rears on the rear also runs twice six or three times six or three times an hour any combination the principle is the same and I hope this helps you understand it. You can completely ignore these numbers. Okay, now let's look at this image in the middle. the rear when you're in the innermost chaining on the front you'll be using the innermost part of the cassette so if you have six cogs in the rear you'll avoid using the two smaller ones on the outside of the cassette if you have 11 or 10 te you'll avoid singing the outer three because the overall width of the cassette is relatively similar, the number of sprockets increases and when that happens their spacing decreases, but the chain angle remains the same, so now we're only concerned with the angle of the chain here I don't know if it's visible outside just a minute ok let's try now ok let's try to draw the angle of the chain ok not the best drawing in the world but I'll post a link to my article that explains this as well with a better picture anyway so we're trying to avoid having our chain severely crossed as if we were to go to the smallest here this is not the realistic size ratio years or distance, but it's like looking at the bike from behind parallel to the longitudinal length of the bike anyway but in even real life you can expect severe cross-chaining combinations to start to catch on the larger chainring adjacent or start scratching the front derailleur cage or so you can have your chain start scratching here in some combinations especially when you're on the bigger front and use some of the bigger ones on the rear , that's why you don't have to worry about the number of

gears

, just avoid using the outermost rear sprockets when you're in your innermost chainring and let's also look at this picture ok sorry this one should also avoid using the innermost like 30 of the sprockets no matter how many

gears

it has if it has six it's the innermost if it has ten it's the two or three innermost but it should avoid using the innermost sprockets in the rear with the outermost front chainring. x system one only has one ok but for now we're stuck with three so that's what you would do and when you're in the middle chaining let's say take this shot you have to avoid about ten percent of the outside and you n percent of the inside again we look to have a relatively parallel chainline we don't want the chain to go at a severe angle that's the whole philosophy now with two two chainrings on the front when they're lined up correctly what's called the chainline the chain, it means the center section of the front chainring is lined up when you look parallel to the bike with the center section of the cassette which has the correct chainline, sometimes it can be a few millimeters off, sometimes you do it on purpose .
how to properly shift gears on a bicycle
I also have an article that explains the chain, the chainline, I'll link to that in the video description as well, but this is the basics, we'll show it later on the bike when you only have two chains. sounds so it's similar just you don't have this middle and these two outer ones are a little closer together closer to the middle and in that case the philosophy is the same with the outer you don't use about 30 percent of the innermost ar sprockets and with innermost chaining you don't use about 30 percent of the outermost brackets now my videos are all very long and very detailed in opinions are divided everyone thinks it sucks and i think it's brilliant so i'll do it now uh discuss uh warning that's uh very uh how to say uh it's modern now it's happening it's current and that problem is the modern uh to buy or especially road bike trainings that have the largest 50 tooth chainring and the smallest 34 tooth is designed for allow for a wide range of gearing but with the use of only two front chainrings now I won't discuss why I think it's like a goal in itself or a triple chaining of the ntero does the job and I'll link to an article on my website about that but it's not modern it's modern to have less chaining ok so they did that combination but the problem with that combination is that for the vast majority of people huh , when they're out front chaining with 50 teeth, they usually have to all go. the angled trail on your cassette because if they use one of the smaller sprockets of that larger chain front chain they can't turn the pedals easily enough on the flats only downhill on the other hand if they do when commuting on flights if they put the chain on the smaller 34 tooth chainring this time they would have to move the chain on the rear up to the smaller fuel sprockets to make pedaling hard enough that they don't spin in 200 rounds per minute like a rabbit so that combination is not very practical and a better solution is to have a 46 by 30 front chainring combination which is now a little less available at least in my country but I think it is a more reasonable combination with the cassettes that are available what do i mean cassettes start 11-12t usually then go to how many on mtb cassettes now its all over to 40t and on the cassettes road bike etes is 32 or 28 or something hi and the problem with that 50 by 34 crank would sell if the cassette was done with some common sense like starting at 14 and then having 15 16 and then two cog spacing and then all the way up to I don't know 32 or even 34. that would bring a little more weight, but it would also bring because there's more hooked teeth, better durability, longer life of the chains and cassette, especially the chainrings of the cassette, and it would make those cranks more useful and things a little longer. durable so this would be a good solution but cases like this are very hard to find they are sold as junior racing sometimes for road bikes and they cost a lot more than regular cassettes so every cassette every chain you it has less than 13 teeth it has more mechanics. losses because the chain is bent at a very awkward angle and when force is applied and very few teeth are placed on the cassette they are doing the job just fine so now we will try to show how this works and also explain another er important thing about

shift

ing gears on a bike and especially when we're talking about bikes with derailleurs the other important thing is not to put too much load on the pedals when you're

shift

ing so if you're loading your pedals to pedal to go more and more fast or to maintain speed when you want to change gears you need to make the twist of the pedals a bit slower so that you don't feel pressure on the pedals against rear wheel drag, I'm not clear if I explain correctly , but here we are wrapping up and then if I want to change gears I'll slow down a bit so the pedals turn slower than they need to to further increase the speed of the wheel so there is no load. on either the front or rear chainrings and then after I'm done shifting I can continue to put more force on it.
Let's see what happens if I'm loading the pedals while trying to change gears. ok i'll hold and push the rear brake and now i'll try to shift and let's see what happens if i destroy my friend's chain i'll get a new one it's very hard and it's getting stuck not just because here you can see you can capture this on camera i hope from this angle maybe better here especially it's critical this is critical when shifting up shifting in the front you see how the chain is stuck here and trying to move into the bigger front chaining and when you apply force everything is down tension and you can easily break the chain by doing this so its not very smart to do a similar problem that happens when you are going up a hill and you forgot to downshift in time and you need to reduce the gear ratio so we are trying to switch to the bigger chainstays on the rear but if you put a lot of force it puts a lot more stress on the chain and on some systems it can do r that the chain breaks even when shifting at the rear.
I wrote the special article on my website about systems that have only one chaining up front and of course with those systems this whole early story about angled chain and how to avoid cross chaining to get gear ratio Desired is of course mute, it's not relevant because you're bound to have your chain very lean when you're using the fastest cog or the slowest cog in a drive train and that's one of the disadvantages of a drive train, I like to joke that they are solving a problem that doesn't exist but hey, in some uses they are useful, like if you drive in extremely muddy conditions, etc., it's all explained in that article, so I'm afraid this video is probably too long already and I'm not sure how well I've explained it. but the basics is to avoid cross-chaining and avoid putting too much pressure on the pedals when pedaling to avoid cross-chaining you just have to be aware of how many uh to be aware of and avoid using the innermost rear sprockets with the outermost front chainings and vice versa sa to avoid using the outermost cassette sprockets with the innermost front chaining and for those who have three chainrings on the front for medium training you will be using the center section of the cassette so I could have made that This video is only a minute long, but why?
I do not limit myself to that, I will put thelinks in our video sections on the timeline so you can skip it hope this has at least helped someone not so badly explained and thanks for watching and see you bye

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