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How to be wise: Simon Cohen at TEDxTransmedia 2013

Mar 11, 2022
you may have noticed i'm not a conventional speaker on how to be

wise

this week i played in a soccer game and tried to tackle someone with my face 21 points it's so bad it's on this side you see when i was 2 years old i was playing in the garden with my sister and i found a pack of cigarettes from my mum so i ate them all you may have noticed i am not a bearded old professor i am not one of the three

wise

men and i am not a wise owl, you might be wondering what the heck am I doing here to talk about how to be wise, other than the last 10 years working in the field of wisdom.
how to be wise simon cohen at tedxtransmedia 2013
I deeply believe that each and every one of us wants to be wise as we want to lead a healthy and happy life people who are wise are able to see life they draw meaning and if they share it they leave a legacy a legacy of hope a legacy of ideas now growing up I was deeply frustrated that the information age, new media, had come a long way, but our ideas about what it means to be wis He seemed stuck in the dark ages clearly with this face. I wasn't going to be a bearded professor any time soon, so I decided to investigate some of the generally accepted ideas of what it means to be wise and there are three particular characteristics.
how to be wise simon cohen at tedxtransmedia 2013

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how to be wise simon cohen at tedxtransmedia 2013...

I would like to focus on one is this idea that wisdom is knowledge accumulating knowledge, so a CERN wise can look at a situation or a person and extract a certain kind of meaning from it, so the conventional wisdom is that we accumulate knowledge so i went that's why i went to university i studied theology but all that happened was instead of answers all i got was more and more and more questions apparently wisdom was more elusive than ever before the second feature is this idea of Aristotle that wisdom consists in avoiding pain I clearly didn't understand it too well for a wise person to be able to look at a situation and somehow know how to avoid pain and I wanted to avoid the postmodern pain of financial hardship so again I followed conventional wisdom. om start a career get job security so i started a career in advertising and got a good salary got awards and recognition and all these great things that come with starting a career but i wasn't happy if conventional wisdom doesn't lead to a happier life how wise is, then there is this third thread, there is a third quality of what it means to be wise, this idea of ​​worldly wisdom, if only we can go to distant lands and distant cultures, we can draw meaning from it, so naturally, i established it. an international communications agency at the age of 24, now 10 years ago and this gave me the opportunity to go to these faraway lands to these different cultures and work with some of what I perceived to be some of the wisest men and women in the world. world. people on the planet like Raj Mohan Gandhi, the grandson of Mahatma Gandhi, His Holiness the Dalai Lama Desmond Tutu, so I wanted to see what are the patterns and characteristics among wise people and how we can access.
how to be wise simon cohen at tedxtransmedia 2013
Is it true that wisdom equals knowledge? Wisdom equals avoiding pain. Wisdom is, as Augustine said, reading every page of the book of life to travel far and wide, so I have been very privileged that in the last ten years I have been able to go all over Europe and much of the rest. of the world, but our journey starts here in the mountains of Montserrat, 30 kilometers northwest of Barcelona, ​​a beautiful place and I was there to train some young people in journalism and there was a gathering of 300 of the religious and spiritual leaders world's foremost but knowledge keepers and it was at this meeting that I met this guy, Dharma teacher Jintao, a complete and utter guy, this guy was a former child soldier in Burma, he went through this amazing process spiritual, he lived under a vow of silence in a cave for many outside of this enlightened being his wisdom can be told from Konya's smile and he told me in conversation Simon how many hands how many hands how many fingers am I holding for oh I know I bet you know this one too because your cheeky buddha put up with you but i thought it was ok four fingers and a thumb thinking i was really smart no no no no no no nine nine nine don't forget the spaces between one two three four five six seven eight nine now what the dharma teacher was saying is that wisdom is not just about what we know but what we don't know the wisdom of not knowing as a society really doesn't like them the gaps in the middle because the conventional wisdom is about accumulating knowledge good grades to go to a good college a good degree to get a good job a good job to get a good salary and so on the gaps in our knowledge are seen as a sign of weakness as a sign of ignorance, when was the last time you heard a politician say I don't know?
how to be wise simon cohen at tedxtransmedia 2013
The beauty of music lies not only in the notes, but also in the space between them. talks and lunches from work sessions to the person sitting next to you and wise people know that with everything we know there is a whole world we don't know this is where the mystery the magic happens so wise people know that some one of the wisest words any human being can say is that i don't know, that's wisdom and knowledge, not only about what we know, but also about what we don't know, and bridging the gaps between what about wisdom is to avoid pain, as well as a really interesting city.
I thought I'd study this as new The city of York, a city like so many others, has undergone profound pain and suffering in recent years, particularly with 911. Is it possible that wisdom could come from a city like this, not in spite of of pain and suffering as Aristotle would say, but because of that? I was invited to New York to facilitate a global youth peace summit, a gathering of young owls and it was in one of these working sessions one of the spaces between the fingers that I met this woman, Dr. Jenny Stepanek, a woman amazing, she told me her story about how she passed a rare neuromuscular disease to each of her four children, unknowingly, she had no idea how she watched them all die, she told me how she used to play, jump and dance with her. children and now suffers from the adult variants of the same neuromuscular disease that killed all four of her children and now has to breathe through a straw she told me about her eldest son Mattie pictured here being held by his mom who died a couple of weeks before 14th birthday birthday Mattie was a prophet a poet a peacemaker had a message of a just peace a message of playing after every storm and Jenny tells me all this with such emotion such vulnerability in her voice it was inspiring compassion in me I realized that as a society we don't really do emotionality particularly not in Britain as journalists or consultants or doctors or many other professions we are asked to leave our pain at the door to be objective to be passionate I realized that journey that when we are asked to be goals dispassionate leaving our pain at the door that is a dehumanizing request we are being asked to be less than what makes us at Instead of avoiding pain, I learned from the journey that wise people recognize that pain is an inevitable part of what it means to be human, but that wise people choose to channel it to inspire compassion in others to be vulnerable to learn more to live longer for love more to be more human and this is a pattern that is seen in all the wise people I have worked with in the last 10 years, so wise people have the courage to be vulnerable, not to try to avoid pain , but to see pain as an essential and inevitable part of human existence. then there is the idea of ​​the worldly wise now that the last 10 years are over, but particularly in india.
I spent a lot of time in India. It was then that I had the privilege of working with the Golden Dalai Lama. Temple in Amritsa r but this time last year I was in New Delhi and my wife was five months pregnant and I've been away for a while and I was about to fly again this time to Uganda to do some work for the State Department from USA State I really miss my wife my wife and that's when I heard an ancient story from Indian mythology that challenged and changed everything I thought I knew about wisdom and what it means to be wise in the 21st century The Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati have a fruit sacred to the gods of their two children, the elephant-headed deity Ganesha and skander, whose long, long life they desperately want this fruit, so the parents devised a game that they say that anyone who travel around the world three times and come back first win the fruit so skander who is all handsome jump on his magical peacock and fly around the world making sure to stop at different holy places on the routes to pay his respects to the elephant-headed deity Ganesha looks at his own vehicle, which is a mouse and pauses to Think after a while and with great devotion mounts his mouse very carefully and circles his parents three times his parents they say my son, what are you doing? his parents say they are supposed to be looking all over the world my parents Ganesha replies you are the whole world to me he wins the fruit as a society we constantly fly around the world when we are not going on planes we are on facebook or twitter or texting when we are missing conversations in the world Right in front of us I realized at that moment that I was in charge of an international communications agency spreading peace throughout the world.
I was skating on a magical peacock missing the world in front of me and realized in that moment that pattern with all wise people you can't rush them why speed it up paul they go slow this is the mindfulness part they take on each person, at each moment, one at a time, so I realized I had to go slow, so I decided to put my company on a company-wide one-year Saturday and coincidentally coincided with the birth of my daughter Sarah so here I am just a couple of months ago in the garden thankfully not a pack of cigarettes in sight with the whole world in my arms and I As I walked every day in the garden with her, I realized that children and babies in particular are probably the wisest of all.
She tries to rush a baby. They go slowly. Each tree, each leaf, each face, one at a time, there is no greater gift than being present, they are so vulnerable, I have pain, I have a need, I don't think I do that, so where are we in this quest to understand what it means to be wise in the 21st century the truth is that I just don't know, but my experience tells me that in the age of new media and technology, wisdom is no longer limited to the bearded old professor, as wisdom is accessible to all and each one of us, each one of us can say no. we know we can embrace the wisdom of not knowing and t The space between our fingers each of us feels pain and we can choose to channel that pain to be vulnerable and inspire compassion in others to be more human and each of us can slow down if only be for a moment. bend down and choose to see the world in front of us and I think when we do that we see the world completely differently and if we can see the world differently and we can take meaning from it and share it with others then we start to leave a legacy a legacy of love a legacy of ideas a legacy of hope for those who follow us you have the power to be wise here and now if you decide to use it is up to you thank you

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