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History Buffs: Midway Part Two

May 29, 2021
This episode is sponsored by Curiosity Stream which now comes free with the nebula details found in the description box below. Hello and welcome

history

lovers. My name is Nick Hodges and here is

part

two of my mid-term review. Thank you all very much for your patience and I hope you enjoy at 6:40 am the Japanese carrier air group finally entered

midway

airspace with the sound of their engines roaring on the horizon the inhabitants of the island came to life everyone ran 109 enemy planes bombed and strafed the base at will, but when they decimated Midway's air defenses, the Japanese soon realized that the planes they were supposed to that were to attack were not parked on the runway as expected, but were flying towards the Japanese aircraft carriers, the

midway

islands air group was composed of 40 torpedo and bomber aircraft and at ten past seven, around the time it was reported that had disappeared, the Americans were right on top of them, but if surprise had been on their side, it was wasted as many of the American pilots were rookies and had just finished flight school and are now flying into a hornet's nest being torn a

part

by the zeros of a Japanese combat air patrol an anti-aircraft fire the B-17s did not fare much better as these heavy bombers were not really designed for naval war use because when you fly at 20,000 feet it is almost impossible to hit whether your target is moving so far.
history buffs midway part two
The Midway Islands air raid ended in complete failure without a single torpedo or bomb reaching its target, but despite his forces attacking. Nagumo was still bewildered, he had been hoping to catch the US air base off guard, just like at Pearl Harbor, but this time they were waiting for him. Some surviving American planes now fly back to the halfway point to refuel, and since the island's defenses had not. They had not been eliminated, they still represented a threat, that was when Aguma made the fateful decision according to Japanese doctrine. Nagumo kept half his planes in reserve, all of them armed with torpedoes and anti-ship bombs in case any American carriers appeared, but from Nagumo he did not expect to see any for the next few days.
history buffs midway part two

More Interesting Facts About,

history buffs midway part two...

He felt confident enough to order them to rearm them with ground bombs and attack them halfway again. Now the process of rearming these planes with different weapons is not quick. Take an hour or two before they are all ready to take off and just as they were halfway there at 7:40 am, this happened, so there is one quick thing I should mention: Nagumo's decision to rearm his planes did not was the main problem. What the movie doesn't mention is that later at 8:20 a.m. Nugumo received a second message confirming the presence of at least one aircraft carrier, this couldn't have come at a worse time because the planes he sent halfway were on their way back. and He needed to land and refuel, just like the cero that circled above his fleet on its combat air patrol.
history buffs midway part two
Nagumo's dilemma was not so much whether I lifted my planes with anti-ship bombs, but whether I launched now with what I have or should I wait to recover all my planes, refuel them, rearm them, and then launch a fully coordinated air attack against that aircraft carrier, my target. Mainly, he chose to do the latter last, which cost him time he didn't have because the Enterprise and Hornet had already launched. their planes more than an hour earlier and squadrons of torpedo planes and dive bombers were en route, meanwhile, just below the waves lurked another threat: an American submarine, the USS Nautilus, had stumbled upon the Japanese fleet during its patrol to 8:24 am.
history buffs midway part two
He went up to the periscope. she depth and she found herself right in the middle of the entire Japanese fleet and spent the rest of that morning being attacked by deadly planes and charges. Now this is all true, but where the movie differs slightly from the story is when we see the Nautilus fire torpedo on a japanese aircraft carrier, you heard you, it wasn't the hero it shot but a battleship called kiroshima and as we see here, That torpedo also missed its target, so you have a bit of creative license going on, but it's no big deal because the Northern List threat was very real and an order was given that would have serious consequences for the Japanese after defending themselves. of the attacks from midway all morning at 9.17am. m., Nagumo had finally finished retrieving his plane and it was at this crucial moment that his scout planes reported the presence of all American aircraft carriers.
Nagumo gave the order to immediately change course from midway and head northeast toward the American fleet with all of its aircraft recovered. Nagumo now only needed 45 minutes to launch his airstrike and win the war, but only a few. Moments later, at 9:20 a.m., an American torpedo squadron from the USS Hornet arrived, but as the planes approached, the Japanese were completely bewildered to see that they had come without fighter escort. The reason for this was that the American launches that morning had been a problem with several aircraft caused delays on the flight deck and as a result the squadrons were ordered to get underway as soon as they were airborne and They won't wait for the other planes to catch up, so at the end there are all these little groups scattered around. flying in different directions on their own with no idea where the other groups were, so when this torpedo squadron began their attack run they knew that without fighter escort their chances of returning alive were slim, but the captain told them that Even if there was only one plane left, I wanted that guy to come in and take a hit and that's exactly what they did.
The American pilots bravely held their course when they encountered a heavy screen of anti-aircraft fire advancing over the water's surface. These slow and heavy planes. They were easy prey for the zeros on the left and right, they fell like flies until there was only one man left. it later crashed into the water but survived, however in the film they changed this little historical moment and gave it to an American pilot from another torpedo squadron, Lieutenant Commander Eugene Lindsay, but he did not survive his career. Another change the movie made was having Lindsay. The torpedo squadron was the first to engage the Japanese when it was actually George Gay's squadron, but regardless of who was sent first, the three torpedo squadrons suffered the same fate of the 41 torpedo boats sent, 35 were shot down without none of them will get it right.
So far the Americans were losing and the stakes couldn't be higher. Nimitz had put everything he had into this battle. He had nothing left in reserve to challenge the Japanese. But even those torpedo squadrons were being massacred. They still made a difference. Nagumo was preparing to launch his counterattack, but this continued to be delayed because his flight decks were busy refueling his fighters while his bombers waited below on the hangar decks fully fueled and ready to go, but in the chaos of rearming them, the Hangar crews had not safely stowed the ground bombs to save time, they had just placed them against the bulkheads, which was extremely dangerous, while the American dive bombers were right behind the torpedo squadrons, but when they reached the coordinates given, the Japanese aircraft carriers were already gone.
Despite being low on fuel, bombardment group commander Wade McCluskey ordered a search of the box and, by chance, at 9:55 a.m. he saw a white trail left by a lone Japanese destroyer; It was the arashi that had stayed behind to immobilize the nautilus. What do you want to bet? She is trying to reach the aircraft carrier. Sir, we've been here for almost two hours. What if we run out of fuel and the entire squadron has to sail with it? Follow me guys, 10 to 20 a.m. m. Nogumo finally gave the order to take off. Their planes were hoisted out of the hangars and quickly placed on the flight decks, but just as they were warming up their engines, the Enterprise's dive bombers at Yorktown appeared out of the clouds at 20,000 feet, damn that magnificent son.
In fact, I found them distracted by the attack of the last of the torpedo squadrons. There were no more fighters left above to provide cover. Nagumo's aircraft carriers were left completely defenseless. This was the moment when all the American squadrons swooped in and began their attack. About halfway there, flak thundered around them, puffs of black smoke filling the sky with flak in the fog of war. Both Enterprise squadrons briefly forgot their training and went after the same carrier when what is supposed to happen is if there is more than one carrier, the lead squadron goes after the furthest one and the trailing squadron attacks the closest one.
What the hell was McCluskey supposed to go for the farthest aircraft carrier? Stay with me, but at the last minute Commander Dick Bess recognized the problem and with two other bombers. They separated and went after the Japanese flagship, the Akagi, as the other squadrons plummeted toward their carriers in a steep 70-degree drop, anti-aircraft fire shells constantly closing in behind them trying to keep pace, the pilots They almost had to hit the accelerators. Through the instrument panel to avoid them all the while concentrating on keeping the carriers in his sights in the water below George found himself a front row seat to the greatest show on earth, the dive bombers continued to scream towards the aircraft carriers and it was until about 1800 feet when they finally started to rise and pull the release lever, then it was the bombs on the bridge here, rear admiral yamaguchi could only watch in horror as the kaga was hit and then the sawyu by three bombs from the yorktown dive.
Not even Ikagi could escape the bombers as he desperately tried to get away from danger. Digbest and two of her companions were on her within seconds when Dick Bess dropped his bomb. He was the only one to make an impact, but he landed in the most devastating place possible: the upper hangar. What happened next occurred on all three aircraft carriers. The fires began to spread uncontrollably, creating the perfect conditions for an inferno. The flames remained in the gasoline hoses that snaked along the decks, igniting torpedoes, bombs and planes, causing a chain reaction of secondary explosions. Things got like this.
The bad thing is that Nagumo had to abandon his flagship, the Akagi, and transfer it to a cruise ship. The only transportation left intact in all of this was listening to you now. You would think with the losses they just suffered that the Japanese would call it a day, especially with the odds no longer in their favor, but no, they kept going and kept advancing towards the Americans and within 30 minutes you launched a full counterattack against Yorktown. Unfortunately, although this is barely mentioned in the movie, it's like you blink. The strange thing, the Yorktown coup, what do we have left?
And that's literally, obviously, Yorktown's fight for survival was cut short for time, which is understandable, but still a shame because what happened was very dramatic as the orc city was hit not by a but by two separate waves. since the hereu, when the japanese were detected on yorktown's radar at 1152, they immediately flooded the fuel lines with carbon dioxide, so that when yorktown was hit by that first wave, its crew was able to quickly put out the fires, so when the Japanese hit the Yorktown again at 2:30 they thought it was a completely different carrier in the minds of Agumo and Yamamoto who was 600 miles away with their fleet of battleships, they may have only had one carrier left , but so did the Americans, yes, when the American pilots returned exhausted and exhausted instead of feeling jubilant about what they had achieved.
The mood was poignant and somber. A quick look at the board said it. All the real cost of the morning's victory could be counted by the empty bunk beds in their dormitories and the empty beds. chairs in the ready room, about half of the men who entered the fray were now reported dead or missing and the torpedo boat squadrons suffered the most, but the battle was not over yet, there was still one more carrier out there and the order was given to gather. All the pilots who could still fly stayedfor a final big push at 3:30 p.m. m., a combined air group from Enterprise and Yorktown survivors launched from the flight decks to find you here and 90 minutes later, around 5 p.m. m., was when they finally did it. get ready murray we're not going to sneak them this time here they come unlike the last three carriers the combat air patrol used here was circling high above the japanese fleet the zeros rose to 19,000 feet to attack to the dive bombers, but like the The Americans were also exhausted.
They had been flying since before dawn and were barely functioning. It also didn't help that this time they were the ones who outnumbered their 13 fighters against the 25 American dive bombers. Air combat could only hold them off for so long beforehand. Finally enough broke through to begin their dives almost immediately the entire fleet opened up the sky turned black from shell explosions with complete disregard for their own lives some of the zeros follow the Americans on their dives towards the incoming friendly fire Just to have a chance to kill their enemy for the next 22 seconds, the Americans dodged gunfire from the falling planes and tracer rounds before finally reaching their drop point and watching their rising red sun shine brightly on the deck of flight, the perfect target in just a few seconds, they heard that you were hit by four bombs and burned. from bow to stern turning it into a floating wreck and from that moment the battle of midway practically ended some isolated incidents continued until the night, but the next morning even Yamamoto had to face reality, his plan had failed spectacularly and cost Japan four aircraft carriers, that is, two-thirds of its total aircraft carrier fleet, as well as 3,000 lives and 275 aircraft against 307 American dead, 145 aircraft and one aircraft carrier, Yorktown for the Japanese, this was a loss so serious that the empire would never me would recover to give you an idea of ​​how important this was.
At the end of 1942, the United States was building five new aircraft carriers, while Japan was building only one, but losing those aircraft carriers meant much more than losing the ships Kiributai had been in the country for 15 years. Making this powerful naval aviation weapons system was only possible thanks to the men who served on the boards, the debt crews, the mechanics, the technicians, the pilots, the officers, the observers, all that great experience that made everything worked like clockwork, it disappeared in the blink of an eye and that's something that can be done. He didn't replace everyone at once, the tide had turned and Japan will be on the defensive for the rest of the war.
America's midway victory also shortened the fighting by at least a year and saved the lives of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of lives. In the end, Japan obtained Trafalgar, they simply never assumed that they would be on the losing side Despite this indisputable fact, Japan stubbornly continued its conquest of the Pacific even though its states were numbered and supply lines were stretched to stop its advance by complete. The Allies now had to defeat Japan on land in hostile environments such as the impenetrable jungles of New Guinea, the second largest island on the planet, or the green hell known as Guadalcanal.
It was at this stage of the Pacific War where things got really ugly and it is covered in great detail in this documentary called Apocalypse, World War II, it is worth checking out if you are interested and if you are you can find this documentary and thousands of others like it on Curiousstream is a subscription streaming service with nothing but documentaries featuring

history

and you. You can watch them all for just 2.99 a month but the best part is that history fans have been offered a special 26th discount on their annual plan which is only 14.79 instead of the full price they have for everyone else and what's more, with curiosity. streaming, you'll also get nebula for free, another streaming service has content for many creators, including history

buffs

, it's a platform without the restrictions of advertiser-friendly policies you'll find elsewhere, so basically any video of mine that need to be heavily edited or gone missing will have no problem being uploaded to nebula the way they were designed to be viewed to begin with, all you have to do is enter the promo code curostream.com historical slash of fans, so here's something i bet you thought i would never say roland emmerich has made a historically accurate movie, i'm not even kidding, this guy, the director of 10000 bce.
C. and the Patriot, has done a 180 degree turn from making historically inaccurate garbage halfway through a movie so accurate that I struggled to find anything significantly wrong with it and Believe me, I tried, but despite my prejudices towards the man , even I have to admit that what he has done here halfway feels like an old war movie from the 60s and 70s only with CGI instead of practical effects where every character and every scene in much of the entire The dialogues are based on the real story. The kind of movie where the story is used as a template for telling a story, not as a guide.
These are the types of movies that history

buffs

love to watch, which is why I'm so surprised that Roland Emmerich made them These history buffs may be a passionate audience, but we're also a niche audience, which is why we Hollywood doesn't like to cater to us most of the time, because to get a movie like Midway right you need a large cast of characters without any focus. Screen time on essential protagonists and tons of exposition. There's no time to mess around with character development when you have this whole story to go through and most people don't like these types of movies, so it's no surprise that the halfway point wasn't well received.
When some of the criticisms came out I understand them but there are also those who assume that because Roland Emmerich is a Hollywood storyteller because there are several scenes that seem so epic and so exaggerated that it must be fiction like a The moment that comes to mind is when Bruno Guy is on the flight deck and sees five high-level Japanese bombers approach the Enterprise, the planes drop their payloads but miss and are eventually driven off by the ship's anti-aircraft guns, all except one plane which receives winged in the attack and He turns around to carry out a suicide attack to crash into the company Gaido sees this and immediately jumps onto a parked plane to shoot it down because of his bravery he saves the ship and is immediately promoted on the spot by Admiral Halsey himself What is it? your name son bruno guydo sir aviation machinist mate third class well bruno you are now an aviation machinist mate first class now we have all seen the scene a million times in other movies but this really happened and halfway through it shows exactly how it went down, the sailor actually ran across the flight deck jumped onto a parked plane climbed onto one of the plane's machine guns and grabbed the guns like that and started shooting at it like that as the bomber crossed over the deck on his right wing cut off the tail section of Guido's plane ten minutes after that was over, paralysis called and said who was that guy in the back seat of that plane shot at the attacking plane and said send them to the bridge, the admiral says which one is their name and they said bruno, what right do you have, bruno? aviation machinist made of third class, I said bruno, now you are aviation machine made of first class.
There are also some other really cool moments later where something similar happens, but for the Japanese it's when agumo The fleet is being attacked by the B-17 bombers from midway and one of them gets hit and deliberately dives down to crash. against Nagumo's flagship. Towards the end, the B-17 is shot down and as it dives downward, the pilot appears to have established a precision of this film that would leave me speechless, it would have to be this, incredibly, approximately a month before the battle. Halfway through, the Japanese were playing a war game and one of the junior officers who was playing with the Americans placed his fleet almost exactly where the Americans were going to be and his superiors were furious when he did this.
It's one of those things where it's like expecting what they actually predicted how the battle would play out in a war game. Now I admit that it is difficult to verify if this story is one hundred percent true. Most of the key people who were there, like Yamamoto or Nagumo, died during the war, so some of the reported details really are rumors, but at the end of the day it's not like the filmmakers made this up; They clearly did their research and thought it would be a great scene for the movie, which it is, and he's going in too. as for saying that even when midway is inaccurate it still manages to be historically authentic, for example there is a short scene in the film where the crew of the uss nautilus are listening to radio tokyo, these were english language propaganda programs that were broadcast through from the pacific on shortwave and were specifically aimed at american gis, they would play the latest hits to encourage them to listen and then an english speaking woman would announce that there are about 20 of these english speaking women who were known collectively as tokyo rose and they were trying to demoralize to American soldiers saying things like that their wives were cheating on them at home, that they were all going to die fighting in this war, and that they were all orphans in the Pacific now;
However, the earliest these shows could have started was late 1942, but more likely the summer or fall of 1943, so the halfway point is taking a small liberty by having Tokyo Rose play much earlier. , in April 1942, but the filmmakers do this so they can have this big transition to the Doolittle Raid. What's going on, captain? I sound like air aid sirens. For me, I have to say that if the inaccuracy of a movie is still based on the story, then that's a big improvement for Roland Emmerich, of course, there are a few more halfway than just one, but it's really not worth it complain about them, like the part where Doolittle gives his big hornet speech about his mission to bomb Japan, if we bomb Tokyo we will be the first enemy in Japan's history to attack its territory.
I mean, if you wanted to get technical about it, you could point to the Mongol invasions of Japan in 1274 and 1281. They failed, but they certainly reached Japan's territory, but you know, maybe Doolittle didn't know that, so I'll give a pass to the movie. I'll do the same for this shot as well. We line up the At the beginning of the movie, the situation in the Pacific is much worse than has been reported, we have three carriers, the hits have 10. So this scene is a little misleading because the United States not only had three carriers at this time , but in reality they had seven, there was the lexington saratoga ranger yorktown enterprise wasp and the hornet but technically what he said is correct because it only refers to the pacific theater and in December 1941 they only had three the others were the atlantic and they prioritized for that theater that's because Roosevelt had decided on a Germany first policy in which it was agreed that the Third Reich was the biggest threat and needed to be dealt with first, so Admiral King was working with fewer resources against the Japanese, so I assume which is being a bit hyperbolic here anyway.
You can see that Roland Emmerich has really made an effort this time to make a historically accurate film. I never thought he'd say this, but I'm actually impressed. There is very little I can separate halfway in terms of accuracy and if it continues like this. So I hope to see his movies in the future, something I thought I would never say. Having said that there is a moment in the film that almost undermines the good work he has done, it is a wrong creative decision that I think is inappropriate. at best and depending on what part of the world you are offensive at, at worst it is at the end of the credits where text appears saying that this film is dedicated to the American and Japanese sailors who fought in the middle of the sea , now remember yours.
It goes without saying, but before continuing I have nothing against contemporary Japanese society. I truly believe that there are forces for good in this world and we have enriched all of our lives with its technology, art and culture. There is a lot of respect and admiration from the Japanese people today. however, i don't feel the same way about the imperial japanese wwii armed forces pharaoh and emmerich putting them on the same level as their american counterparts is not touching, justit's wrong let me explain it to you like this if you remade the battle of britain today how do you think people would react to the end credits? said this movie is dedicated to the pilot of the royal air force and the luftwaffe, they would be up in arms screaming bloody murder and you know, if people If you have this visceral reaction with Nazi Germany, then why doesn't the same happen with the Japanese empire, especially when its war crimes were just as abhorrent and evil?
Well, the truth is that people in Western countries tend to generally ignore what the Japanese did in the world. war ii and one would assume the same would be the case with roland emrick if it weren't for the fact that he did a ton of research into this film and even mentioned some of its atrocities, as another text appears at the end of the credits. Say that the Imperial Japanese Army killed about 250,000 Chinese civilians for helping Doolittle and his men escape. I just tried to visualize that number for a second. That is, a quarter of a million people killed as punishment for a raid that caused very little damage.
Cruelty had not been seen by a foreign invader in China since the days of the Jenga khan and his Mongol hordes. Now some people might point out that yes, but the atrocities in China were committed by the Imperial Japanese Army. This film is dedicated to the imperial sailors. japanese navy well the truth is that the navy was just as guilty of war crimes as the army and roland nemerick even shows some of them at the battle of midway ensign franco flaherty and his gunner bruno guido the same bruno guido mentioned above were shot down During a dog fight they managed to inflate the rubber life raft in time as they sank into the water, but tragically they were photographed by a Japanese destroyer, the Maki Gumo.
At this point in the battle, the Akagi, the Kaga and the Sawyu were in flames and The two airmen were met by a vengeful crew. These Japanese sailors had for the first time tasted defeat and were eager to take out their anger on the Americans for losing face. Tell us your ship while we throw you overboard. Now in the movie, this interrogation is. much more cordial than what really happened bruno guido shamelessly asked for a cigarette and the captain reciprocated or simply so that roland dembert could have someone to say this stupid phrase to him. You know he had a lot of friends at Pearl Harbor, so how about you actually go yourself?
The two were horribly beaten and after confessing everything they knew, the captain ordered them to be tied to fuel cans with weights, but in the movie they used an anchor guide. The owner, Flaherty, screamed for mercy as they were dragged aft, but no. Fortunately, they were thrown overboard like trash and drowned. Another thing the film doesn't show is that Flaherty and Guido weren't the only American prisoners killed midway. There was also Enzyme Wesley Osmus, who was one of the pilots of the failed torpedo boat. His plane also crashed and he was picked up by the Arashi, the same destroyer that was hunting the Nautilus despite showing almost suicidal bravery during its attack.
You would think that the Japanese would like the same decision to be made after revealing the information. Commander Yasumasa Watanabe ordered his execution, a terrified Osmus was dragged to the stern and a Japanese sailor attacked his neck with a fire axe, but failed to decapitate him. Oswas was knocked overboard, but managed to cling to the ship's railing. The Japanese sailor hit him once more with the ax and the American fell. his death another atrocity committed by Japanese sailors who fought midway was on a heavy cruiser called tone which was the ship his reconnaissance plane spotted the American fleet during the battle of March 9, 1944 they had been assigned to commercial raids in The Indian Ocean When a British merchant ship named Berger was sunk, the survivors were pulled from the water and after 10 days in captivity, 70 were gathered in the stern and the Aruneo master Konju ordered their disposal.
This instruction was due to a standing order from the imperial government. The Japanese navy first issued it to submarines a year earlier, but was later modified for warships. The order said not to stop at the sinking of enemy ships and cargo and at the same time to carry out the complete destruction of the crews. The bear survivors were kicked in the stomach and testicles by the eager captors, then one by one their heads were cut off and their bodies were thrown overboard for the sharks. This sadistic behavior of Japanese sailors can be seen in all the countries they occupied and a large part of this could be explained by their training. was instilled in them from day one, the same was done in the army as well: officers would physically beat their recruits for the smallest infraction, who in turn would take out their anger and frustration on the only people inferior to them, the soldiers were forced to become slaves. mentality towards their offices there was no concept of human rights the result was that when they were sent abroad, they in turn thought it was okay to act brutally against people they considered inferior, these inferiors included prisoners of war and the subjugated people they conquered because the Surrender was dishonorable and, if they had any honor, they would have died protecting it, so every time new territory was occupied, the authorized officers even encouraged their troops to go crazy in an orgy of rape and murder after they had their money washed. brain years of racism and xenophobia.
Mercy the Japanese were considered non-entities, which meant that their useless lives belonged to the emperor and his devoted warriors to do with as they pleased. When we went looking for food we found hidden women we thought, oh, they look delicious, so we We rape, but every The only time a woman was raped, the soldiers killed her. Killing a Chinese was like killing a dog. The worst atrocity committed by the Japanese navy was in the Battle of Manila in February 1945, where 17,000 naval soldiers fought to the death defending the Philippine capital. against the American liberators over the following month, the city saw some of the worst street fighting of World War II, unsurpassed in levels of urban destruction in the Pacific War, but when these Japanese sailors began to lose the battle, they took out their anger powerless. about helpless civilians facing an imminent death sentence, engaged in wanton acts of cruelty on an atrocious scale resulting in the deaths of 100,000 Filipinos in mark Felton's book massacred c the history of Japan's naval war crimes quote The experiences of Filipino historian Benito J. lagarde when he was 18 and what he saw saw women raped and bayoneted from groin to throat and left to bleed under the hot sun.
They grabbed the children by the legs and slammed their heads against the wall. The babies were thrown into the air and caught with bayonets. unborn fetuses were bayoneted from pregnant women and by the way there are photos of Japanese troops doing this but I'm not going to put them in this video for obvious reasons, if you still need convincing you can google it right now. I'm not saying that all Japanese sailors were war criminals, but they all share the shame because they were fighting for an evil regime where war crimes were a matter of foreign policy in the same way as in Nazi Germany, going back to the middle of the road and how the film is dedicated to These Japanese sailors only think about what they were there to do.
They went to defeat the United States to maintain their newly conquered empire. Now consider what life was like for the 250 million people who lived in it and the 30 million who died in it. all the darkness of the world we knew was gone and these strange people with guttural voices that we didn't understand were in charge of our lives and they were cruel, brutal, they were the dark ages that came to us, descended upon us, well that's it. My name is Nick Hodges and thanks for watching history buffs. Remember that if you like the show, help the channel grow.
If you want to support history buffs, you can now do so on Patreon and, as always, let me know what you think in the comments section. about the halfway point and of course what historical film should I review next. In the meantime, check the history buff's Twitter and Facebook page for updates until then. See you next time.

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