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History Buffs: Band of Brothers

Jun 02, 2021
Hello and welcome

history

lovers, my name is Nick Hodges and we're back with another World War II epic. This time we follow in the footsteps of Easy Company, based on the book Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose, this is the true story of a company of American paratroopers during World War II, this miniseries follows their complete story from their training in the United States to the battles they fought in France, Holland, Belgium and the outcome of the war in Germany, done in the same style as Saving Private Ryan, which would send the benchmark. and show the potential of high-quality television that fortunately we enjoy to this day with the budget of a Hollywood blockbuster and the use of well-developed characters that only a television series is really capable of exploring and you are left with one of The best miniseries ever made.
history buffs band of brothers
This is a

band

of

brothers

. When you think about paratroopers today, your mind usually associates them with World War II, but the concept actually has its origins toward the end of the first. Many nations toyed with the idea of ​​this as a way to overcome the stalemate of trench warfare in 1917. Winston Churchill proposed leaving entire regiments behind enemy lines and the concept was equally shared among Americans in the final weeks of the First World War. World War. Brigadier General Billy Mitchell actually planned to execute him as head of the US Army Air Service. He had a firm belief that air power would play a dominant role in future rules.
history buffs band of brothers

More Interesting Facts About,

history buffs band of brothers...

The leftist colonel and a staff named Lewis H. Brereton proposed an idea to send soldiers from the 1st Infantry Division to the German-occupied city of Metz. they would fly over the front lines from maneuverable bombers they would glide from the wings they would deploy their parachutes and once they landed safely they would attack the Germans from the rear if things had been different this would have been the first air assault in

history

the operation was planned for February 1919, but was quickly shelved due to the armistice and the end of the war, so the Americans would not achieve the first large-scale military airdrop, the honor passing to the Soviet Union in 1930, since who had invested was very involved in this concept and had successfully carried out many airborne operations, obviously during peacetime, the world realized that in just a few years many nations created their own airborne troops, such as Japan, Italy and, of course, Germany.
history buffs band of brothers
Hitler was particularly interested in what the Soviets had achieved. and he was interested in adapting the airborne forces to the German war machine, looking for anything that would give him an advantage. Today, airborne drops are a tried and tested tactic, but back then it was truly pioneering and the world got its first taste of it when in April 1940 Germany invaded Denmark and Norway in the first hours of the attack, German paratroopers Elite fighters called FAL Shimoga captured strategic airfields and bridges, although their landings were unopposed in Denmark, they were attacked in Norway, but it was a great success for the first time in history. and the theory of airborne troops became a battle-tested reality and demonstrated its tactical necessity on the battlefield, but the fallschirmjäger were truly put to the test with the invasion of the British island of Crete.
history buffs band of brothers
They would represent the majority of the German forces that would be deployed on May 20, 1941. It was the largest airborne assault ever carried out, as in previous operations, its objective would be to take a vital airfield in the first wave. The fallschirmjäger attack They were outnumbered nine to one and faced a well-defended enemy unlike their first successes in 1940 they did not have the element of surprise and the British and Allies would be waiting for them, but despite suffering heavy losses during the launch and its assault at the airfield they achieved their objective, the German air force was now able to bring in supplies and reinforced the fallschirmjäger with a mountain division, the next day a convoy of German and Italian warships attempted to land on the island with more reinforcements, but in The attempt was crushed by the Royal Navy and Air Force, leaving about 20,000 Germans. paratroopers and mountain division tasked with taking on 40,000 British, Australian, New Zealand and Greek forces against all odds, the filthy cobbler emerged victorious and pushed the allies into the sea, all thanks to his elite training as paratroopers.
This victory demonstrated to the world not only the importance of the airborne forces, but what they could be capable of, but surprisingly Hitler did not see it that way, the numerous casualties that the scarce function had suffered were too high a cost, the first successes in 1940 they were due to the advantage of surprise, an advantage that could never again be exploited to its full potential, so the Battle of Crete would be the last time the Germans carried out major airborne operations; The role of its paratroopers would instead be used as basic infantry, but despite the reservations of the German command, the United States was extremely impressed by the excellent performance of its paratroopers in Crete and previous operations, just at this time, the United States barely He was beginning to assemble his own airborne forces and was eager to rise above Germany's high standards.
One of these activated divisions would be the 101st Airborne. accept volunteers and subject their recruits to a tough and rigorous training program, a program designed to weed out unfit recruits and prepare soldiers both mentally and physically to carry out dangerous objectives that would be carried out far behind enemy lines with little support and completely The surrounded recruits undergoing training were of a different race than the average soldier and were treated as such. The Bandar

brothers

even mentioned that one of the advantages of being a paratrooper was the extra pay. I don't know what it was, they mentioned it with the The guy who gave me the speech was Sena, but they pay you $50 more a month, so that made it $100.
Now, what the

band

of brothers doesn't mention is why they would pay you $50 more a month and the reason is pretty bleak, of course. I didn't realize it at the time and realized later that $100 per monthly jump was blood money. I will find out later, this blood money was offered because the army knew what was in store for its paratroopers, in fact, they were expecting it because The thing is, unfortunately, as with all paratroopers, their successful performances in the field They go hand in hand with their own mortality. The great loss of life that the Germans considered too high was an acceptable cost for the Americans, but that does not mean that they were intentionally sending these brave men to their deaths, they prepared them as best they could, but the strategic importance of the paratroopers did not. could be ignored.
The hunter was the first to know that they would play a vital role in the battles to come and everyone was prepared to do so. That sacrifice was Major General William Sealy, 101st commander and considered the father of the United States. Airborne gave an important speech to his men on August 19, 1942. The 101st Airborne Division has no history but has a date with destiny due to the nature of our weaponry and the tactics we will be affected by. We will be called to do it. We carry out operations of great military importance and will usually go into action when the need is immediate and extreme.
Let me draw your attention to the fact that our insignia is the great American Eagle. This is an appropriate emblem for a division. crush your enemies falling on them like a bolt from the blue the history we will make the record of great achievements we hope to write in the annals of the American military and the American people depends wholly and completely on the men of this division, each individual So Therefore, each officer and each soldier must be considered a necessary part of a complex and powerful instrument to defeat the enemies of this nation. Each one in his own work must realize that it is not just a means, but an indispensable means to obtain victory. goal of victory, therefore, it is no exaggeration to say that the very future in which we hope to have our part shaped is in the hands of the soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division, so we are now at the review part in to discuss the most interesting inaccuracies I discovered during my Band of Brothers research.
Having said that I am NOT going to go over every single one of the little ones. I know a good portion of you are World War II fans and could see every inaccuracy in the show. has as a major violation, on the other hand, I need to make the decision on which one to prioritize for this video and also judge them fairly. Tom Hanks, the executive producer behind Banner Brothers, is quoted as saying that we've made the story fit the screens we had. to condense a large number of characters, fold other people's experiences into 10 or 15 people, make people say and do things that others said or made people take off their helmets to identify them when they never would have done so in combat, but I keep thinking. it's three or four times more accurate than most movies like this and yes, I completely agree with it.
I'm not too stubborn to admit that compromises need to be made for entertainment purposes. I don't have a problem with that as long as they remain respectful of history and I'm happy to say that for the most part they did an extraordinary job of getting it right, but as with every movie or television series adapted from historical events, there are inaccuracies and in the case of the Banner brothers there will be some that will really surprise you, so I will start with the smallest ones, but as I go, they will be improved. You'll see what I mean, so let's start with that scene from episode 3 when soldier Blyde stumbles upon the dead body of baal shem Yaga after realizing that the German paratrooper is dead, blythe sees a flower on her uniform called Edelweiss, then Lewis Nixon explains its symbolic importance, it's a device that only grows in the Alps, above the tree line, meaning it went up there to It's supposed to be the mark of a true soldier, so what Nixon said there is largely true: a device only grew on the outskirts of the Carpathian Mountains and is supposed to represent the mark of a true soldier, but not a paratrooper from the get-go.
During the World War, the Edelweiss was used as a symbol by the elite German and mountain troops called de Burgh Villegas, which actually makes much more sense since they are the ones who train and fight in the mountains where they grow, but in Rather than wearing the flower itself, it was used as an insignia on a uniform and the idea that it represented the mark of a true soldier may have its origins in Berthold or Bach's 1861 novel Edelweiss. In one passage, he describes the difficulties in get an Edelweiss as possession of one is a test of unusual boldness, the white flower also represented the purity of the Alps and its inhabitants and was a statement of German and Austrian patriotism as seen here in the arena of music.
Well, the reason I think there is an inaccuracy is because I don't think any fallschirmjäger would be brazen enough to use a vise, not without getting their head kicked in by Edgar Berg's Yeager. It is very similar to the same significant importance that American paratroopers placed on their jump boots. Another thing they get special permission to do is wear these very shiny jump boots, they were called parachute boots and no other unit in the army could wear them, it was something very special and the troops loved it, they really did and the paratroopers broke a lot of noses at Fort Benning. isn't a pair of triple-duty jumpers, so next we have the scene where Lieutenant Spear shoots the German POWs now, before you get your panties in a twist, I'm not saying the scene is 100% accurate or inaccurate, what is presented on screen is intended to represent the true rumors and speculation made by Easy Company, having said that Stone Malarkey did not witness Spears gunning down this group of German prisoners.
This is based on what he said in his book Easy Company Soldier, but that doesn't mean Spears didn't do it. For shooting prisoners of war, there is at least one witness report confirming that he did it and may have contributed to more exaggerated rumors like the one shown in Band of Brothers. There is a great interview with Arthur Maurizio, a dog company soldier who was with Leftenant Space on d-day and I participated in the firefight that was d-day we had captured three Germans and I was with a tuned lead lieutenant and a master of jump it was him and another sergeant and there was nothing we could do with theGermans and the lieutenant called us together in the group and said jumbo, he says, take that one there, we are all lying in a ditch and I will take care of this one, take that one and we match it and shoot all three of them now, unfortunately, the The reason they shot those Germans is because they didn't have time to take prisoners.
They were right in the middle of D-Day. They were trying to regroup with the rest of their company and had to hit their target all the time. Far behind enemy lines and completely surrounded, they didn't have the resources to eat them, protect them, or the manpower to protect them. If let go, the prisoners would tell other Germans where they were and were also ordered not to take prisoners. On D-Day, General Maxwell Taylor, commander of the 101st Airborne, told his paratroopers that taking prisoners would harm their ability to carry out their mission. Now, personally, I don't approve of any of this, unfortunately, this is one of the tragedies of war, but I think it's important to understand the given context of that situation in terms of the other rumors about spear shootings of prisoners of war in different occasions.
I must say that I don't entirely know if they are true or not, this is the only one that seems believable to me moving on to this next inaccuracy that I'm not going to lie. This is really stupid, whether it's shoddy writing or a big mistake if you do. is. I can't believe this wasn't corrected when it aired on TV or even when it came out on DVD. It's at the beginning of episode 9 when the title clearly says. April 11, 1945, begins with the string quartet playing Beethoven and we see civilians clearing the streets of debris. The camera finally settles on members of Easy Company looking at the Germans, then goes into a flashback and stays that way for the rest of the episode. until the end, when we come back to the scene, the dead saint Hitler shot himself in Berlin, um, no duty, this is April 11 and Hitler didn't shoot himself until April 30, so, Unless they stay frozen in that place for more than two weeks, then what you just said is absolutely bad slang, malarkey, malarkey, isn't it?
Yes Mr Hitler, at this point he was alive and kicking hell, he's probably still in his bunker complaining about Mass Effect Andromeda, so the next one I have is a bit controversial and has to do with lefty Dyke's betrayal now you'll remember like the officer who panics during the attack on Foy and ordered his men to stop advancing while they were exposed and vulnerable in the open field. Carl Lipton was the company's first. The sergeant said that the dam had collapsed, this was not seen as a big surprise to anyone and Easy Company, as the left-handed dam was not particularly liked by Winters, who saw Spike as an incompetent officer who often disappeared. without explanation and he didn't look.
He followed his men and preferred to hide in trenches rather than fight, earning him the unflattering nickname of Trench Mormon. These are the stories that led to what you see on screen; However, there could be more to the story than that, according to Clancy Lisle, who was in the fight, saw Hammond left. He could have been shot in his right shoulder and panicked because of the wound and not the situation. Shortly after, a doctor took him to the rear and relieved him. Buy spare parts. The thing is the simple explanation that the dam is a coward doesn't really hold up once you look closer, for example, he received two bronze stars for acts of valor once in Holland, when on September 23, 1944 organized and led dispersed groups of paratroopers in the successful but important defense.
The road junction on young Arnhem's vital iron supply route against superior and repeated attacks while completely surrounded the dyke also received a second Bronze Star in Bastogne when on 3 January 1945 he personally removed it from a position exposed to the sight of the enemy to three wounded members. of his company while under intense small arms fire, based on my research I believe Dike was a flawed man, he certainly deserved some of the criticism shared by Easy Company, but not to the point where he has been unfairly immortalized as a coward. 40 probably haunted him until the end of his days and most of us will never know how we would react in that given situation, so moving on from that, we have the most famous inaccuracy of all the Banner brothers.
No, seriously, it's very impressive, in fact, it's a bit spectacular, it will make you go, oh, we found out, it all has to do with Albert Blythe's character, he is the central protagonist in episode three and the biggest part is dedicated just for him, so there is no doubt. about the importance of getting it now, like many of the other characters on the show, he's based on a real soldier and a lot of the things he goes through in Bandar Brothers actually happened, except for one small detail you see at the end of In episode Blythe is shot in the neck and ends up in a military hospital and then the credits appear saying that Albert Blythe never tells of the wounds he received in Normandy, he died in 1948, except that he did not recover from his wounds and died. in 1967, that's exactly how he reacted when I found out.
I mean, how the hell did they figure out that this isn't a minor character? The entire episode is dedicated to him. Well basically the real story is that when Blythe was shot by that snipe outside. On that farm, however, he was shot in the collarbone or right shoulder, but not in the neck. Blythe was sent back home to have her wounds treated and he never returned to Europe. The rest of Easy Company never found out what happened and for some reason assume that he. she died in 1948 when Stephen Ambrose, the author of Band of Brothers, was told this, he didn't question it, he wrote it in this book and that story was transferred to the television series, but imagine if Blythe hadn't died in 1967, would she?
No? It would be funny if you had lived to see Band of Brothers on TV and he's watching an entire episode dedicated to him, he's very happy, he's enjoying it, and then at the end he says that he died, so now let's move on to the final inaccuracy. In this review and thinking about it, he really isn't that bad. I personally feel that the real story is more interesting than what is presented on the screen. These are very quick moments in which Major Winters formally accepts the surrender of a German colonel as is tradition. the German officers shoot a pistol as a symbolic gesture of surrender, but Major Winters refuses and allows him to keep it, so in real life, this colonel was actually a major in the first place.
I have no idea why they felt the need to change his rank to colonel i. I don't think he adds anything to the scene other than it's more impressive that he has a higher rank in the winters, but then again, why stop there? Why not make him a general or quarterback while you're at it? It just doesn't make sense if you ask. I, the second oldest, Winters accepted the gun from the oldest and kept it until he died and the story behind the gun and what it meant to Winters is very moving and I felt like they missed a great opportunity to include it.
I was a senior scientist and when he came in he presented me with this gun and offered his personal surrender, naturally I accepted gratefully, so that would be the end of the war for his men and this is basically the end of the war for my men and the The meaning is that it wasn't until later, when he gave me this gun and I had a chance to look at it carefully, that I realized that this gun had never been fired, there was no blood armor, this is how every war must end with a bloodless deal and I assure you this gun has never been fired since I've owned it won't be fair so that concludes everything I wanted to say.
I hope you enjoyed this episode and please don't take this video to mean that I did enjoy it. brothers banner I think this is one of the best World War II adaptations ever made. The benefits of it being done as a miniseries allow us to follow this company of soldiers from training to VE Day. The time limitations of a function. The film is no longer a problem as it allows the audience to spend more time with each of these well-crafted characters, so that when some of these characters lose their lives, their losses have a much greater impact and we get a little glimpse what you must have.
What these brave men have been like and the sacrifices they had to make day by day, week by week and month by month, the successes of the Bandar brothers far outweigh any of the inaccuracies I have mentioned and I am sure that the vast majority of you agree. With me, that's all, my name is Nick Hodges and thanks for watching history

buffs

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