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HHC-Alzheimer's Disease and the MIND Diet-Part 1

Jun 06, 2021
As a speaker for this evening show, he has been the executive director of the Houston Southeast Texas chapter of the Alzheimer's Association since 2002. Richard received his undergraduate degree in human nutrition from UT Austin and his master's degree in biochemistry and nutrition from Virginia Tech. He is

part

icularly interested in health promotion and prevention strategy strategies Alzheimer's

disease

is a

part

icular concern to mr. Elba on his maternal grandfather lived with the progressive

disease

for five years before his death in 1998 and his paternal grandmother suffered from Alzheimer's for many years before her death he is currently caring for his aunt living with mixed dementia please welcome to Richard Albine good good evening I don't know if this is working welcome I'm delighted to see you all here and you were able to get the truck through that's great so you've already made it and one of the brain hurdles we offered tonight so So before we start with the presentation, I wanted to draw your attention to two items that are on the table in the lobby that you may have seen, one is a card about the Alzheimer's Association professional conference that will be held on May 5th. it's an all day conference and we'd love to have you attend and the other is sign up for our public policy it's very important to us to keep advancing

alzheimer

's disease in faith deration. at the level requires support from the federal government through the National Institutes of Health, and while the Alzheimer's Association is the largest private funder of Alzheimer's research in the world, it doesn't compare to the US government. and the way we continue to increase our funding. is to sign up and become an advocate so that our voices come together and our elected officials know that we care about this, they do a better job funding Alzheimer's research and that's critical to us so we're going to talk tonight about Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's. as well as some

diet

s, in particular the

diet

of the

mind

, and it has a bit of information that I hope you've picked up with an overview of the diet of the

mind

and a bit of an overview of the facts and figures about Alzheimer's on the back of that so i just want to preface everything that was talked about tonight that there the information is meant for healthy people so all the research that has been done and that has been done something related to lifestyle in healthy individuals and has to do with postponing the impact of disease in healthy individuals, so what might be appropriate and applicable for a healthy adult as they age might not be the same for a person . you are currently living with

alzheimer

's so don't expect that if you apply this to people with alzheimer's i guess that's the disclaimer your results may vary so please understand really all the research of the What we're talking about tonight has been done in healthy people and the impacts are whatever benefits have been seen in those people, so we're going to talk about some things about healthy aging in general and some of the aging strategies and, in In particular, how lifestyle has an effect on healthy aging and then we'll divide the concept of lifestyle into four groups and look at cognitive activities, physical health and exercise, social engagement, and then diet. and nutrition and then we're going to talk in the diet and area about some different diet strategies and I hope you have an idea of ​​how to apply them by the time we're done and if not I don't know I don't know what to tell you because I will have failed so when we talk about aging one thing we all know is that we all age differently and we all have different aging experiences partly based on our genetics so we know people that everyone and their family seem to live into their 90's and seem to be very vibrant and then we have people we know, for example my family, where people are lucky to live to be 70 because they are prone to a number of diseases that are debilitating and ultimately knock us down and are largely genetic and not we have a lot of control over that, so we age differently because of that and they were predisposed to some of those things regardless of who we are. predisposed to although we can influence how it impacts us based on a couple of other things, one is the environment and part of the environment that we have control over and part of it that we don't have control over and then lifestyle, which I would say that most of us have a lot of control over our lifestyle and you will see that intentionally on these slides you will see the word possibly or may italicized because it is very important for all of us to constantly remember that while research may suggest something, it does not prove it and when we talk about lifestyle there is very little evidence and so mostly what we see in the research is an indication in one direction so it's mostly directional and not conclusive so the word can is very important and also of course there is a difference between risk reduction and prevention so just to give you an idea example of that and i told you in my family people tend to die as fast as possible we are like weeds or something and so my brother who is four years old or was four years older than me and was a maniac who was actually in the health field, he was a doctor and he dealt with diabetes so that was his area of ​​expertise and he was very sensitive to cardiovascular issues as everyone else in the family dies of heart disease so he handled everything related to his heart health. he was an avid biker and runner he wouldn't let any fat cross his lips i mean it was almost a game to see if you could hide something so he would eat something fat and he died of a massive heart attack at the age of 56 , so it's an example of you being very sensitive to your risk factors and doing all the appropriate lifestyle activities and yet you died of a massive heart attack so risk reduction is not the same than prevention there is a limit to what we can do so let's talk about the brain for just a second and basically the brain controls all of our functions, bodily functions as well as our thoughts, our emotions, our movements and it does that through this huge network. f brain cells or nerve cells that are called neurons and there are a hundred billion of them so that's a lot and those brain cells create a giant tree shaped network in the brain that branches off and communicates through electrochemical signals electrochemical and those signals are actually where all our thoughts and memories exist is in the signals and alzheimer's disease does two things one is it actively kills brain cells so that's not a good thing and the other thing is to block those electrochemical signals so they don't get from one nerve cell to another, so those two things make it very difficult to build new memories and also create those thoughts or deals, there's a lot of distortion that happens, and as the disease progresses, interferes more and more with the capacity of the brain. to generate those memories thoughts feelings impact movement all the things that we see in people with progressive Alzheimer's disease or some other their dementia, so in the Alzheimer's field, particularly the Alzheimer's Association, we always say that what's good for heart is good for head so its like a watchword if you start thinking about something good anything related to lifestyle if you have heard something is good for your heart you can assume it will be good for your heart too head for your brain so the brain the reason for this is the brain is a rich network of blood vessels in fact it's the richest network of blood vessels in the entire body and those are necessary because that's the way where nutrients and oxygen get to all those hundred billion cells and that's critical to the health and success of your brain, so you need to keep yourself nourished every time your brain your brain every Once your heart beats 25% of what's ejected goes to your brain so that's a big thing you can see the connection between the two so when we think about dementia and we think about your brain or what we know it's the body ages and the brain ages, so there are changes that happen, i mean, i think any of us who are getting older, like everyone in the room, knows that your body isn't doing what it did when you were 20 years unless there is someone who is 20 here I don't think so then your body is behaving differently and so is your brain and there is a change in your ability to process information as you age so you are probably a little slower in Processing information, you were probably a little slower in your 100-yard run as well, so that's not necessarily a bad thing, but it's different than diseases that affect our brains, so we need to think about the fact of that there are a number of diseases. that affect our cognitive abilities and those diseases progress as we get older and that's why we think of them, like we connect Alzheimer's or other dimensions with aging, even though it's not normal aging, there's the difference between normal aging and it . slowing down of some of our brain abilities and the disease state that would be Alzheimer's or dementia and so when we think of dementia in general we are talking about some type of change or decline in cognitive function that affects the everyday life that's really what happens when talking about dementia that's what we're talking about we're often asked what's the difference between alzheimer's and dementia so I'm going to answer and I'll tell them after I answer no You'll remember I answered this this way because for some reason we really want there to be a different answer, but I just told you what dementia is, which is this kind of general concept of a change in cognitive function that affects everyday life, like this that's dementia so they probably want to ask well what is causing dementia and alzheimer's disease is a disease so in the united states it accounts for 60 to 8 0 percent dementia and it's just one particular disease there are other diseases that people have that also affect cognitive function for example people with Parkinson's disease as it progresses it can cause dementia but it would be Parkinson's dementia , not Alzheimer's dementia.
hhc alzheimer s disease and the mind diet part 1
I think you heard that I am my aunt's caregiver and she has mixed dementia so she has a number of different things, Alzheimer's is not one of them, but there are other things that are affecting her cognitive ability and so I can tell you that She's often confused about things the rest of us wouldn't be confused about, but she can remember a lot of things I wish she'd forget, so just a touch of dementia like Alzheimer's would be somehow easier, so we thought in Alzheimer's disease, there are a number of risk factors, the biggest risk factor is age and I don't think any of us are interested in correcting that, so that's not really an adjustable genetic problem, it's another that we don't have much control over head injury is a significant risk for Alzheimer's d Please, that's something we do have control over, so if you have children or grandchildren and they s Whether they are bicycling or horseback riding or playing some type of sport, it is important that you encourage them to protect their head because that head injury in youth could increase. its risk in adulthood so also cardiovascular disease is a risk so you hear the connection between the heart and the head and that is something we do have control over and then education so the formal education is related to risk of Alzheimer's disease and it's not more formal education, it's Less, so people who have more advanced formal education have a lower risk of Alzheimer's and again, you know I say that and because just keep in mind that it's a risk, which is why we have a lot of people who come to the Alzheimer's Association with double PhDs and develop Alzheimer's disease. its a risk issue not a predictive issue let me say that as well and i will say it several times there is no proven method to prevent or cure alzheimer so let me repeat that there is no proven method to prevent or cure alzheimer for what if you hear someone tell you differently they're lying there's no proven method so i know you've read about coconut oil not true magnets not true I mean there are all kinds of things out there .
hhc alzheimer s disease and the mind diet part 1

More Interesting Facts About,

hhc alzheimer s disease and the mind diet part 1...

We get calls every day asking about a new cure and there still isn't one and there isn't a drug that will cure Alzheimer's either, so we're still in the position we're in. trying to treat the symptoms, but we're not curing the disease yet, so because we know there's nothing we can do about a lot of the risk factors we talked about, we justwe're going to focus on the few we have control over which are all lifestyle so we're taking genetics and moving it to the side we can't do anything about the fact that we're getting older so we're left with some of lifestyle issues and we'll break them down into four groups and think about each one individually and we're going to take a look at what the research tells us in each of these areas so this isn't an opinion, it's based on the research that there is, if there's no research, I'll tell you there is also, and in general, there's not a lot of research in an area of ​​Alzheimer's disease, then we still need a lot more information about Alzheimer's disease than we have, so that we will do what we can regarding lifestyle.
hhc alzheimer s disease and the mind diet part 1
It's important that you do things you enjoy, so that's a key concept. you don't want to be completely interrupted and so you want to do things you enjoy you want to add new strategies gradually you're more likely to incorporate them gradually rather than just when we talked about diet mind and you'll see what it's like if you adopted that today by Friday you'd be back at McDonald's so let's not do that and so what I would say is no matter what starts right away regardless of how old you are, start right away because the lifestyle the impact is over time you can't do it one day a week you have to incorporate these things over a long period of time so let's start talking about exercise and there's a lot of research on this area, this is the most researched area of ​​lifestyle. on exercise and physical health is strongly associated with a lower risk of cognitive decline and most researchers doing anything in the area of ​​Alzheimer's disease and cognitive problems will say that exercise is the most important thing you can do to improve brain health, so I want to make sure you've heard that exercise is the most important thing you can do to improve brain health. in weight loss or weight management and surprisingly this is the same research that you're hearing in each of those areas as well so if we're talking I would say that overall it's a lifestyle activity that can really affect your health In general, whether I'm talking about heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, weight management, or cognitive health exercise, so you know we can all just take a walk afterwards, but it's also the hardest thing for Americans to incorporate. .
hhc alzheimer s disease and the mind diet part 1
I think someone walked here today. I've felt like you could have gotten here faster if you had walked, but we don't live in a community where physical activity is easy, so you know we really have to do everything we can to be physically active, not just straight exercise. It can affect cognitive health, but it also affects all the other risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, so all those other diseases that we think of as risk factors, so when we think of risk factors as diseases heart, high blood pressure, diabetes, are also affected. positively by incorporating more exercise so you think about what you can do and you can build a habit in just 10 or 15 minutes a day so start with just trying to build a habit of doing some kind of activity and you should be as active as you can possible. can then the key is to reach your highest level of ability from an activity standpoint if you can jog don't walk jog if you can only walk walk if you can sit in a chair and move your arms and legs sit in the chair and move your arms and legs but whatever, stay as active as possible and research shows that walking 20 to 30 minutes a day if you did it three times a week still has a significant impact on sitting watching TV those 20 o 30 minutes a week it really should be cardio so you see a cardio activity is important so weight lifting is ok but cardio get your heart pumping where it's moving blood to your brain it's very helpful you need to avoid injuries and so we know we're talking about cycling of course putting on a helmet is a good idea but even injuries where you might fall or slip are important and then make it social if you can check more than one box at the same time one of the items is being socially engaged and so if you can do something that is both social and active that's great and that would be a way of know that maybe it will increase a little bit, you can go dancing, join an exercise group, do a sport that includes other people, so then we talk about physical health and what are some of the problems related to physical health and the biggest one is smoking so smoking is a big problem it's also definitely associated with increased risk of dementia l like a number of other diseases that are risk factors for alzheimer's and dementia this next one is going to be a Uncomplicated so you'll see it says limit alcohol and most researchers would say if you don't currently drink then don't. don't start drinking, that's generally the way research looks at this topic, so in general the sense around alcohol is one or two glasses of red wine seems to be beneficial, but if you don't currently drink, don't get started, there's also good research to suggest that red grape juice may have at least some of the same benefits as red wine.
I can tell you that, having done both, I prefer red wine, but you know that there go your concerns with alcohol and the reason why this is particularly a problem is that alcohol also affects memory and balance. and emotional problems, so some of the same concerns you would have about cognition and cognitive decline may be present with alcohol use and may also increase the risk of falls. especially in an older person where there are depth perception issues and also just walking around and putting your feet up enough to use rugs and other things that can increase the risk of falls so that would be a concern and then interactions with meds can too as people are on more and more meds the impact of a little wine can make a difference sleep how many of you have heard the latest study on alzheimers and sleep did anyone hear this about this latest study some people see they have so sleep alone is a problem and of course interrupted sleep is a problem for people in terms of cognitive function so for example people with sleep apnea tend to have some cognitive problems and need to be treated , but the most recent study looked at sleep and the impact of interrupted sleep on cognition and there are suggestions that it increases the risk of or Alzheimer's disease and one of the ways that it does is if a person sleeps less than five hours a night they are probably very tired I think but or if they have interrupted sleep and wake up throughout the night either they tend to cause beta-amyloid to accumulate in the brain, and beta-amyloid is associated with Alzheimer's disease. disease, so at this point we don't know from that research whether amyloid beta buildup is causing reduced sleep or sleep disruption or whether sleep disruption is causing amyloid beta buildup, we don't know which is , but there's definitely a relationship between a good night's sleep and cognitive decline, so it's something that should at least be monitored and then stressed. something to think about and then depression if there's depression it needs to be treated and then we always say you should know your number and knowing the number just means you should think about some of the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease like high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar levels which may be suitable for diabetes, weight management, cholesterol, so the way the research indicates these work is that midlife obesity is associated with higher risk of Alzheimer's disease. so midlife obesity i think we'd all argue when is midlife and he's 10 years older than us but you know guess where midlife is and that's probably when i started to have to loosen my belt a little bit and then middle age hypertension.
Same thing, so high blood pressure in midlife seems to be a risk for Alzheimer's diabetes regardless of it being a risk for Alzheimer's disease and then with cholesterol, there really is a jury on this, for So there is some research to suggest that high cholesterol increases the risk of Alzheimer's and dementia. and there's some research that says it's probably irrelevant so I would say I can tell you if you have high sterol cholesterol you're at higher risk for heart disease and of course heart disease puts you at risk for Alzheimer's disease so there you have it and then particular populations, especially African Americans and Latinos, tend to have all of these risk factors more than the general community, so it's an even bigger problem in those communities, then we come to cognitive activity, the key with cognitive activity is to use your mind in new and innovative ways and to challenge your brain and the idea is to create new new pathways in your brain so you then actually basically know that's why it hurts a little bit when you start doing something new trying to learn a new language or if you have tried to learn to play an instrument as an adult or learn a new dance step at some point you are exhausted, your brain hurts from having to do it and it is because what you are doing is creating new paths and that is exhilarating, but being stimulated can sometimes be exhausting.
Research suggests that any type of formal education is very good for forebrain health, so formal education is different than simply reading a book at home; It's actually going to a class online or in person and overcoming those challenges and being tested, it seems to be a benefit so how do you exercise your brain? You do things that are mentally stimulating, which means you could do something artistic or creative. Something that challenges or inspires you. You should be solving complex problems, so you have to put yourself in a position where you have to think. in new and innovative ways now that I've said all that let me say that there is no proven activity that slows down Alzheimer's disease so I know there are some programs online that are presented that way but there is nothing that is proven let him do it. delay alzheimer's disease or prevent alzheimer's disease these are all things we know there is a benefit to cognitive activity but that doesn't mean it prevent nts alzheimer's disease so any of you are using lumenocity someone is doing lumenocity i the big problem is that the question is what is the problem with the lightness so yeah when i sit in the airport i look around and many people around me are doing lightness so it is it is a series of games and activities that challenge the brain and I would say that there is a basis in some research to suggest that it is a way to stimulate the brain, but there is no evidence that it is actually beneficial.
I'll tell you there are some researches a UCLA researcher Gary small says you should do if you want to try and stimulate your brain as you take a piece of paper and fold it in half this is not the part that stimulates the brain it's ok so fold it in half and you draw a line from top to bottom and on one side you write things i like to do and on the other side you write things i don't like to do and make a list of all the things you like to do in the one side and all the things you don't like to do on the other side and then if you want to stimulate your brain guess what you do the ones you don't like to do because the reason you don't like to do them is because you're not good at them and the reason why the one that you are not good at them is because you have not created the pathways in your brain so just for example you heard that my grandmother developed Alzheimer's disease and I can't imagine a person with more abilities than my grandmother because when I was a child sat down with people in her living room and knitting a sweater while talking to people in 3-4 different languages ​​whatever language they spoke she would join in with them she could play the piano she could probably finger knit off her feet while doing that I mean she was very skilled writing Braille and writing Braille books for people who needed to read Braille so I can tell you that for her knitting and speaking in those languages ​​was not brain stimulating she tried from teaching me how to knit and finally through the ball of yarn in the cat she didn't like the cat either so because there was no way she couldn't she couldn't make it happen she wasn't that interested either more fun throwing it at the cat but i couldn't figure it out , it was very difficult, however for her, she didn't even have to look down to be able to knit the sweater and that's it, that was not brain stimulating. for her it was tremendousstimulating to me for the 5 minutes i tried it similarly my father was fabulous at crossword puzzles he did the new york times crossword every day monday to friday he finished them every day it was not brain stimulating for him because he was very good at that.
He hate crossword puzzles. I can't understand the first three words in a crossword puzzle, so I should because they stimulate my brain, but they weren't for him. He should be doing Sudoku or something. otherwise this is how you think abo but how to stimulate your brain that's what it sounds like not good news for those of us who don't want to be aggravated so the question is how old was my grandmother when she started manifesting so that you know by the time someone on the outside recognizes that there are cognitive changes the person already knew they were there for much longer but when I recognized that he was probably in his 80s when I saw it but he may have known there were problems long before he is ok so social engagement this area has the least research there is the least good solid data on social engagement and the impact of social engagement but what we do know is that people who are engaged with others tend to have higher mortality and disabilities reduced, so the research is out there, but it's just an epidemiological point of view, we know that people who continue to socially Engaged people have less mortality and less disability, it seems to be some kind of buffer against cognitive decline, so being socially engaged seems to be beneficial, we know that people in general don't do well in isolation, so getting people out people, getting people activated, getting people involved seems to be a good thing and just generally finding purpose in life, so we've all heard of the person that was viable. fully effective human beings who work every day somehow got convinced to retire or retired and a year later they weren't alive and there's actually research that suggests that's true because it's important to have a purpose the kind of things to stay socially committed of course spending time with family and friends doing things that make you feel good with other people and creating that network and maintaining a healthy network staying involved in the community you will see one of them volunteering outside your home so if not Are you sure what to do?
The Alzheimer's Association is always looking for volunteers and I promise we will give you a purpose in your life if you want to come and volunteer with us. We move on to diet and nutrition and again we know that what is good for the heart can also be good for the brain and we know that there is a lot of research on heart disease and diets that benefit heart disease and reduce the risk of heart disease . disease so we know there is research out there and in that area let me say when I say diet and nutrition I know often people think of supplements so often people say well you know I'm not going to eat that well, but i am going to take some supplements to make up for it Supplements are not the same as diet they are not the same and the research just isn't there to support anything in the area of ​​dietary supplements so it almost doesn't matter what we talk about , there is very little research to support dietary supplements, so when you see research that talks about a particular nutrient being linked to a particular disease, whether we're talking about Alzheimer's disease, there are studies that have looked at vitamin E or the combination of vitamin e and vitamin c or b12 and folic acid so there are a number of nutrients that have been tested in alzheimer's disease and there are some practices in the city ad and across the country where those supplements are given to people diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. disease that does not mean they are effective in preventing or reducing risk, so the fact that it can be given to a person currently diagnosed with the disease is not the same as the benefit you might get from it. that same supplement if you were to add it to your diet so I'm just warning you that they are drugs but they are drugs that are not and are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration so you are taking them as a drug, if you just think about it, it says it's just a nutrient, but when you eat an apple, the nutrients you get from that apple are different than if you were to select a nutrient and think it would somehow have a healing effect and take it for its healing potential. it has a risk reduction effect, now you are using it as a medicine and expecting a result, but you don't know what other results you can get, so i would definitely add supplements with great caution.
I would talk to a doctor before adding any kind of supplement and I would make sure they understood all the other medications I was taking because a lot of these nutrients interact with some of the medications you may be taking so the comment is if you tell your doctor that maybe you don't care or have some comments to make and you know that can be a good indicator that you might want to think about another doctor so that I can let you know when I say things to my doctor. I'm making you care so I encourage you to talk to someone who cares so they can see in this one of the things I'm saying is the word can be italicized so the benefit of the diet can reduce your risk but you also may not know there it depends on how you follow it depends on a lot of things so dietary interventions are potentially beneficial but there is no guarantee so diet first and i think everyone has heard of the mediterranean diet , whether you know all the details, have heard of the Mediterranean diet and the Mediterranean diet is just the lifestyle that exists in the Mediterranean basin, so if you are in Tunisia, Turkey, Greece or Italy, that It is the Mediterranean, the south of France would also have this type of diet and it has been studied. extensively in particular on the impact on heart disease and it clearly reduces the risk of heart disease, making it a very effective intervention for heart disease.
I can tell you that my cardiologist every time I go encourages me to follow a Mediterranean diet when I tell him. I'm a vegetarian I'm already on a mediterranean diet ok I still think you should follow it ok so you can see the key to a mediterranean diet is that it's plant based no. w is not vegetarian but it is plant based so the emphasis of daily intake is on plant based products so they are whole grains and you will see that in all of these whole grains is a fundamental concept that the grains are in their natural state. legumes so that's beans and peas nuts fruits vegetables olive oil is key so you can pretty much bathe in the stuff i mean it's a you know there is no restriction on olive oil intake the same way you can talk of other fats and then red wine, therefore in the Mediterranean diet red wine is a routine part of the diet if you have traveled to the Mediterranean basin, particularly Italy and Greece, you know that almost every meal has something of wine, but it is not like that. get drunk with it, but it's part of the meal.
Red meat isn't completely off-limits, but it's definitely discouraged in the Mediterranean diet only a few times a month and the serving size for that serving of red meat is around four ounces, so my hand isn't a good for hounds portion but a woman's hand if you just look at this part of the hand which is about a four ounce portion so it's a small piece of meat fish eaten regularly so almost every day fish is part of the diet and fatty fish are generally the salt of choice. it's rarely used and the way to offset those tastes is through the combination of spices and then as I say there's very little dairy olive oil, it's almost always used instead of butter so we can butter a piece of bread there would be a little bowl of olive oil and you're dipping it and there's usually spices in the olive oil and then for dairy it's usually low fat or fat free so that's the Mediterranean diet then it developed a diet that was to address hypertension to lower blood pressure there was a diet called dash is an acronym for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension and it also seems to work or seems to have the same components that would be needed for osteoporosis cancer heart disease stroke and diabetes, so it covers a lot of bases beyond hypertension again, it's a plant-based diet, so it heavily favors plant products over what s animal products, with an emphasis on vegetables and fruits and low-fat dairy, moderate amounts of grains, so this one is also a little more concerned with weight management and therefore is a little more, I would say calorie-oriented, thinking about the total amount of calories in a day, so there is concern about the intake of grains and animal products. add this really horrible limitation of five sweets or less a week.
I'll just tell you it's painful, but still five or less sweets a week and then it's all about lean meats, so lean meat, lean poultry, lean fish, unlike the Mediterranean diet which would have a lot of fatty fish, this would be lean so the mind diet was developed specifically to address cognitive issues and was a hybrid of what we saw to be beneficial from the mediterranean diet and d what was recognized to be beneficial from the DASH diet so also is an acronym. You know these people. You wonder what they are doing. and D delay, that's why you say mind because it's too much, it's a hybrid between the Mediterranean diet and the diet - and it was developed by a group of epidemiologists at Rush University and what they did was they collected questionnaires over a period of four and a half years out of close to a thousand people 923 adults and then they assessed how they were compliant with this diet and what the results were, so they filled out questionnaires and had periodic neurocognitive tests to be able to monitor what their cognitive health looked like and these 923 people had ages between late 50s and 90s but the average age was 80 so again keep in mind this is an observation One of the people who are already behaving a certain way saw that if they adhered to this diet mentally, they reduced their risk by 53% that's a huge reduction of developing Alzheimer's disease yeah so just to be clear I didn't include it here but if anyone sticks strictly to the Mediterranean diet or strictly adhere to the diet, there is also a reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's disease, it's not as strong as this, but it's significant in both, where this is perhaps more interesting is that for people who only moderately adhered to the diet, there was still a 35% reduction, which is significant because most of us aren't really good at strictly adhering to anything and so if you have to adhere strictly, your success may questionable, but if you can stick to it moderately and still have a significant impact, that's great, so what would come to your attention is that cognitive function was like a person seven and a half years younger.
That's very significant, so their cognitive health stayed quite better if they adhered to this mental diet, but then we get to what the diet is and that's where it gets a little bit more difficult, so I told them this is a hybrid between the Mediterranean diet and the DASH diet and I also mentioned that both diets are plant-based diets, which means that most of the food eaten in a day is plant-based and not animal-based, so they are organized in a very simple way, which means that we can all understand it, it is not a problem of understanding the diet, it is a problem of following the diet, but the quotas, the first one is green leafy vegetables, and that is why it says that every day we must eat a salad not an iceberg salad because iceberg isn't a leafy green it's crunchy err so this is talking about a dark green leafy vegetable like kale or romaine lettuce so a dark green salad it's one and then another vegetable on top of that every day and then nuts we're supposed to include nuts in our diet every day and sorry it's six times a week so we're supposed to include nuts in our diet almost every day. nuts, then berries are on this list, you didn't see berries on either of the other two lists, so berries weren't mentioned as a separate item from fruit, so there are a number of really powerful studies on the impact of berries and compounds in berries on brain health and Alzheimer's disease, so this is an area that's actually been researched quite well, in fact, one of the researchers was from the University of Houston Clear Lake, who was part of a national study conducted outside of theTufts University and it was specifically on blueberries and the results of that study were very strongly in favor of incorporating blueberries.
I can tell you that many people in summers feel blueberries every day no matter what I can tell you. I am one of them. I just bought m. pray blueberries today so there is pretty strong evidence on berries so it says berries but I can tell you the strongest berry is actually blueberries which have been well studied so daily beans are supposed to be included we are supposed to include beans at least every other day whole grain so basically i hope you have a question so the question is about organic vs inorganic which would mean they are rocks but so organic vs non organic and first of all place, the Alzheimer's Association. tell you that you don't have a position on this in general in other diseases that I have been involved with and have worked with often, the challenge in general if we think about the American population, adherence to the diet is difficult and for many it adds to that a financial shock makes it harder, so if you were to tell me if it's better for me not to eat blueberries if I can't get organic blueberries, I can tell you that the answer would be to eat the blueberry. ries if you have a choice and if you can easily afford to go organic, no doubt pesticides probably bring their own deleterious impact on the body, but you are more than offset by having those things in your diets so you know it's more You likely get some of the poisons in the environment from fruits and vegetables, and yet every diet I've featured, our plant-based, and plant-based products tend to have more of these pesticides and herbicides than you know. eating meat but eating meat will kill you faster needing all those plant based products so it's a balance and for most Americans organic is out of their ability to buy so sorry it's an, you know, it's like I'm just dancing, I guess. yes ma'am you don't see AIDS anywhere eggs I was going to say I know I don't think diet really helps with that but okay eggs you know isn't that interesting?
You don't see eggs anywhere, yes, and you. I didn't see it in the Mediterranean diet and and you didn't see it in the DASH diet yes and when you look when you look I was going to say that when you look at the daily diet it's there, but it's definitely not something that is encouraged. I mean it's there because people in the West tend to eat eggs, but I think it's just there. a couple times a week maybe

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