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Genocide In Rwanda - Lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years

Dec 24, 2021
so we call the

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genocide

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lessons

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forgotten

after 25

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as you know we are right at 25

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after an incredible world event that we want to talk about tonight a couple of quick announcements and then i want to offer a prayer as we begin this session Some of you mostly single-minded already know that we originally planned this around General Romeo Dallaire, the Canadian general who was in command of the UN forces in Rwanda during the

genocide

and as a great story to tell unfortunately due to personal issues that he can't to be here we have a great person to tell the story from another perspective and I have a couple of respondents and then I open up for some questions and answers.
genocide in rwanda   lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years
You can see how to text questions if you want to send some questions or comments. I am fully aware that this is a very touchy subject and has deep feelings on all sides, as I have thought of it to the medical world, the deeper the cut, the longer the healing process. d the most difficult to scab off and it may be too soon to even scab off after 25 years for some because of the depth of pain felt on all sides of this tragedy. I'm probably more concerned, though not about telling the story. from what i am about looking to the future, what can we learn from this?
genocide in rwanda   lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years

More Interesting Facts About,

genocide in rwanda lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years...

Because unfortunately, as you know, the story could be told on one scale or another in several other countries around the world. This is not something unique to Rwanda. over and over again in many different countries in different ways, including quite frankly some of the polarization that we have in our own country, so I hope that the way that we can move our direction is towards how healing takes place, how we help and we instigated that process and how we learn from the

lessons

of the past I would like to begin by offering a prayer a prayer for healing a prayer of gratitude for those who have survived and particularly for those who are now working in that country and developing its future let us bow our heads together our merciful Heavenly Father we gather tonight to remember a horrendous period in the history of this world cornered in a country and neighboring countries deeply felt by many of us we seek your presence father as we seek healing you seek understanding as we seek a path to the future that can help us all to become the kind of neighbor mo, the kind of friends and colleagues you expect, thank you for being with us, thank you for bringing this group here. to spend time together we pray amen let me do a couple of personal reflections on rwanda as many of you know i have pretty deep roots in africa and have been out of ronda many times i remember getting a call for the ministry of health i think probably in 1995 or six I don't remember for sure only a year or two after the genocide Can you come over please?
genocide in rwanda   lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years
Coloma Linda come please help us restore our health care system so I traveled and it was short enough after the battle that there were still signs of the trauma in the country there were 32 hospitals in Rwanda at that time they had 100 doctors in the country who served around 8 million people and from that base one recognizes the enormity of the reconstruction that had to be carried out because many of the professionals who had the opportunity to leave the country left before the genocide began or escaped during the genocide and when you have the opportunity to walk away from the tragedy, usually you have family you have friends, you have obligations, so no one can blame those who walked away from that census for me to watch and listen now, because those who left They are not considered true survivors because they were not there during the tragedy and that is understandable for those who went through this, as you know, it was precipitate.
genocide in rwanda   lessons learned and forgotten after 25 years
Affected by a plane shot down on April 6, 1994 that killed the President of Rwanda and the President of Burundi, yes, they are still in debt. ate how that plane went down, which side actually shot it down, were there those who were looking to precipitate a crisis, or what exactly happened to that plane, but it was clear that planning for this episode was well under way at the time it happened, but that it was a precipitating event that started us on the path of this genocide estimates vary but approximately 800,000 people were killed over the next six weeks, both Tutsi and also moderate Hutus seeking to protect them seeking to care for them and so on and we will listen some of those stories tonight of what it took to resolve this tragedy, the government quickly put a reconciliation program in place and I've been privileged to participate in some of them and see what was happening as they tried to achieve the reconciliation that it was supposed to take place between the two tribes there is a long history they should go back and see how the tutsis and those of q who became different people goes back literally centuries and how a tribe became a particular kind of thing and another and another one of the tragic stories and if you are an interesting book if you want to read it is the one entitled I wish to inform you that the Tomorrow we will die with my family written by an Adventist pastor hiding in the chapel of Genaro blue hospital well at any time one of the chapters of that book tells the story of a group of even after the genocide was ending the terrorists if I call them who entered in a girls school in Kabul, the district capital, not far from ooga Niro, and they say okay, what is the year to season, what are their Hutus and they knew they were going to kill the Tutsis and the girls were they stood up. tall said we would order and they refused to identify themselves as a tribe and they all got shot but there was this level of pathos that was going on in this country and of course building in Congo you want to go to Tanzan? ia Burundi that tragedy has shocked the world in my opinion it is a tragedy in the face of the western world we refused to intervene and we said no no this is a local conflict let's not do anything the US government the French government the Belgian government my the lord said no no let's stay out of this this is not our battle not unlike some of the questions we face today in tragedies around the world how do you get in if you're going to get in how do you get in in a way that she is appropriate and understanding of all the variables there Melinda has been involved with the new Genaro hospital now with what is called the Adventist University of Central Africa how can we call it a beautiful new campus just outside of Kigali the Adventist University of Africa Original central was in western Rwanda and as the site of one of the massacres, so the church, when the massacre ended, that silent dormant for many years, did not have the heart to go back and re activate that campus and eventually sold it. to the government and each establish a new University near Kigali the MU Genaro Hospital Chapel the tradition for years was that when the tragedy came after the increase in tribal tension go to the churches you will be safe in the churches they will not enter the churches and That's what happened.
His people flocked to the churches, but they were no longer safe and in the Bucanero hospital chapel they estimate that approximately 3,000 people were murdered in that chapel and for years as we traveled there were rough wooden boxes. skeletal boxes of bones that were left in front of that chapel as a market and various other memorials have now been set up I remember very clearly being there a few years after the original genocide and they were in the process of setting up a memorial about probably half an hour after looking at a hospital we went to see it and it wasn't ready yet but there was a guard there so if you want to look in my shed it was a raw tin shed. there my bowls throw and you know the style which is not often in africa and so we said sure i think we gave him a coke to get into the building and as we were going on tables or by 8 pieces of plywood covered with skulls and then another part of the building were tables covered with femurs.
Why they had femurs and skulls was never clear to me, but that was what was there waiting for the monument to set up to tell the story. There is an amazing memorial building in Now Kigali, if you ever get a chance to go to Rwanda, be encouraged to visit it. It tells that story and everything that happened in that country today. Rwanda is probably the fastest developing country in Africa. It is sometimes called the Switzerland of Africa as a country and Kigali the capital is often now referred to as a Singapore of Africa clean streets modern buildings skyscrapers rising from the threat a great deal of progress is being made and yet , it's still that story that haunts that country try that, I think it will take several generations before we can get beyond that, it's a charm that lingers in cultures for years and years, so tonight we're here to cook to acknowledge and certainly not to celebrate to acknowledge, remember and learn from tragedy. from 25 years ago and we are delighted to have Emanuel Hobby Monica with us he will start Emanuel is a survivor of the tragedy out there he is a young man who has been featured by National Geographic and we would like to invite him to tell his story, then I will have several respondents and I'll open up for Q&A at the end so Emanuel thanks for being with us it's all yours before it starts I just want to show you a part of a film that was my first film actually that I worked on related to what The doctor.
Jeff seid and it's summed up I wish I could have a moment to show you all but I'm sure I have another time to have a screening night and see where it goes and I think people should take it and then I'll be back kakuzu gasps I got over Terre Haute it wasn't kamae no one would have done it there is a Ginobili in the imitated restart in 1994 Rwanda lost about 80% of its minority Tutsi population in one of the most successful genocides in human history absolutely we were not there in a role to protect civilians, in fact chapter six mission is not allowed to protect civilians almost 1 million innocent lives lost they drowned everyone including my mouth all of a sudden Rwanda this little african country got the highest.
The percentage of orphans in the was a really tough format as a population, but I'm sure I can say that the recovery was amazing. It sounds and makes you feel sorry for the orphans and you pity them. You know horrible things have happened to them and yes their situation might look that way, but when you have time to spend with them and you think no, this isn't bad. and too bad this is Wow very brave in the summer of 2010 i started a journey with my friend Emmanuel i felt if i became like his toilet era they would make it about the moment and what it means to survive in a world he grew up in and one that was experiencing for the first time we set out to learn what recovery really means for a population that lost their parents to the world's worst crime a population that they have been a part of since childhood what we started as a simple documentary project soon became a world journey to find the answers to the questions that Emmanuel had been waiting his whole life to ask his companions to our possession and ohanga in a Nintendo manga editor walk baron and baron de anza call upon Ottoman and equity names them to his family in your court you are a year old, but the headline catches the bullets, which are the ones who saved simon cordoba, resigned and escaped, okay. well, me to try to find help and those who participated in the genocide, you know if I have a friend in the week in a society or all those people must coexist with it.
Wanda's orphan community as the youngest demographic of people who keep memories of the genocide that took 1 million lives in just 100 days my daughter come and ask me why I don't have my grandmother so it's hot when they reach young adulthood and they begin to raise the next generation their recovery and the lessons conveying well to a large extent the term in Rwandan discourse the question is how do we prevent it from happening again that's where the survivors come in that's where the orphans come in and you explained how you saw this to rebuild a nation. I think that's one of the main things we have. learning from the people of Rwanda and orphans in particular is how you can really survive no matter what, so tonight is it.
I'm very happy to share the stage with the color Wilkins and to be in a Romeo Darrell spot. also, who is now also in the movie, i think this is not just a coincidence, i hope some people will say that he pretended to be, maybe you will explain to me how i ended up here tonight and then stopped the genocide story. I do not claim being an expert just because sometimes especially when you know there are so many aspects that again involve political and social scholars but I think tonight I thought maybe I'll just tell you the story that's going to be heard since it's a big audience and I as an audience interactive how i remember it because i was too young not toreally forget but to understand what was happening and 25 years ago today possibly was like this today May 20 22 I was somewhere in the middle of the country in Qatar Amma and 25 years ago t Today I don't remember any day.
I think the only day I remember for sure is April 7th and the only reason I remember it is because we've all been told, so you've all heard April 7th. oil shale and then people start getting killed but I think I am NOT going to go into historical background but this is what the colonial power used to measure their noses to distinguish who is going to be the Tutsi who is going to be the truth the Hutu I'm not going to talk about it but I was born to these people this is my mom and this is my dad and I think I look a bit like everyone of the two so this is just a clip or that I cut out and try to find No I think we have a lot of photos of our family.
So these guys met in the '60s and my dad was studying to be a priest in what we call a seminary in Rwanda and my mom wanted to be a Catholic nun, a very interesting mix, right? And one on my phone in my father, his brother in my father's family, I'm sorry, it was only two children, so my father and uncle actually three. and one of my brother was too young but one of my uncle was killed in Bujumbura back then and then my grandmother my grandfather I decided to call my dad to stop being a priest and get married banan so it's very interesting like that and then um the kids 90 between 11 so i was born on december 25th or 1984 and so i was born in a very small town called Charan G outside of the capital city yockeygal II so i grew up there and when i was around 7 this It's 1992 and we've heard things from the neighbors who know we're starting to be people who are starting to be skeptical and some people, my dad had a reputation of being a really tough guy, a bad guy and in 1992, I remember he was close to Christmas, I got home from school and then, as usual, and in the afternoon, we'll take the cows to look for food in a bush. and we saw the body, many bodies of people who flow in the neighbors go to the river, so this is the river and the river is really daddy, as you can see, but at this time it did not just smell of blood and then the cows could Ni we even drank the water, we ran very fast home and then we told our parents what we saw, they already knew but we didn't know because we were too young and they didn't want to scare us a few days later and then our neighbors who didn't share the same ethnicity as they would do to be precisely some Hutus they were too extremist and they hated us a lot and they were nice singing around our doors and that one night they threw stones as a roof and one night my father was a school teacher in the area and he came from teaching and then they caught him at you beat him up and then another guy who was a Hutu a very good friend of mine a son of this lady here Catherine and he jumped to save my dad and they also bit him and threw them into the containment plantation we had and then at night my mom was going home and she heard some people screaming and she took them inside the house the next day where my dad was going to the hospital and he, Catherine and Catherine's son, can you tell house? she said you know i heard you will be killed tonight and so please do what you want manager its my english understandable so far and she said please go away i dont want you to hear yelling because catherine in the past and this is what they told me to be before she had a repeat forever hide families my own family and in earlier days when i was born and so i came i came and this time it was me and my brother benjamin and my cadet sister and my my my sister my cousin sister and so my mom said ok guys today is different so choose what you want and then go to catherine's house she will tell you what to do and then please don't even you know do not show I knew what was going on because I knew. my dad was bitten and a day before my younger brother and younger sister didn't know and so we want to go to Catherine's house she didn't hide us in the house but took us tonight to the sugarcane plantation near the river that I just showed you and we stayed there one night, we could see the house far from home at night, the fire, we can hear the destruction of the house and everything, so my mom and dad managed to move and they got to Catherine's house again. they came to pick her up from a sugar plantation before he went in the morning and we moved we went to a community like the mayor's office because my dad knew the mayor before and we asked if he can serve us and the message not this time so that we took, we went to the nearby hospital that was running. by the catholic nun and we pretended to bring my dad home in a hospital since you know they beat him up and then we stayed there for one night the next day my older sister Claire who was in town was going to high school in town and she came looking for us and then we went together so i'll go back to those photos so we moved from this place we went to this teacher here oh and then our life between 1992 and 1993 was moving from place to place because when the killer couldn't find it in the house, the well followed us everywhere and then my dad's name got huge and so in 1993 a small area for those is random in the room. that they are a little older yes one two two three yes so that you remember the had your ear turn so it is a radio of theorems that is known as the radio of hate and so on but also so many advertisements were happening in a newspaper I was nine years I did not know anything all these things that I look for on the Internet just to give you clues and these are the ten commandments of which just to tell you how many things are taught about hate everywhere they publish the figures of local authorities or to teach in the newspapers is to preach hate and make us look very bad and particularly this this this newspaper is called Canberra wake up and stay but the truth jimana's book is basically saying these tutsis who considered themselves as God's people what are you going to how are you going to survive this machete and this is how raffia can translate and so and from what they said that they were like doing some things that the truth possibly where I came from someone from e Abyssinia and so throwing people into a river I was sending what they called the short cut to send them where they came from, but I'm not going to go into those details, so we moved to Kitchener and, as I told you, my family moved was moving back and forth, we ended up being in one of the church Nikita shot and Then at the church we met a lot of people mostly joking but also some others who weren't part of it extremists up to our toes and then we were huddled in his room and we couldn't breathe, so that's weathering. we both want another place another place is more home that's what my brother had just bought and the older brother stayed an egg in a cathedral and the night of the sick we had a big explosion for those who know Kigali it's part of the key complicated local kagama you can see the airport from home so we went outside to see what happened because you had an explosion at the airport and then we saw the fire flame and then the next day my mom said y'know what? ready to move go pick up whatever you want b Because the next day we can leave and go somewhere so this time I knew clearly that I was 9 years old but due to the routine of previous events I knew we were going to go to again nowhere, we really didn't know where to go. so i went and picked up what i liked and then we had lunch after a great but the night was really crazy because we have like a shot and a kigali those who and the kagera still remember that and the next day the 7th time i think its the only day I remember how I told you and we had a great afternoon we saw the soldiers' truck come in it was in our neighborhood and then a few minutes later we started to hear a shot Papa Papa approaching us and my mom is getting ready she is dealing with the dishes in the kitchen and my dad was listening to the radio on the other side of the house and we had a very close neighbor shot and I was in the backyard I'm trying to see what you know when you're like 9 you need all those things you know what i was already scared but not really at that point when i got shot and then i tried to meet my mom in the kitchen and i tried to go see my dad i'm trying to see who is going to be more protective and fight with these guys and while I'm trying to do exactly that and I saw this guy pushing my dad in the backyard when I was out and I'm like, you know, yeah, it's over and like everyone else, you know when a has old sons you know you see your dad is a hero he goes to you you know how the american psyche kicks everyone you meet sorry for the expression but i said my dad is going to kick ass no one will touch me but this time i see him being humiliated and being pushed like they can't save and then they put him aside on a bench that was in there and at the same time I approached the kitchen window where my mom was and I have millions of ideas of what is going to happen if this guy happens got like ak-47 and then with a knife on top i wonder if i'm going to get killed carried by the knife to the top or get shot and wonder if maybe he'll go to heaven you know many million thoughts and then he did many you ask a lot of questions my dad he gave him whatever he had three asking and I gave him his ID gave him some money that I had in a pocket and he tossed it and then he said no this has been done enough and then while all this is going on some they are still torturing one of the neighbor's wives the husband was shot but we can hear the neighbor kind of yelling whatever he asked Mel C to finish and apparently they were torturing her and then the guy came back but he came with the Mohammed guy and Mohammed was a local leader who was showing them Tutsi witch houses or even some cases who is not a prick who is not on their side who is whatever mainly who is the house of guardians and Mohammed was in a corner of the house holding a spear and then he looked at us he looked at my dad the soldiers he threw down the defense of the fence it wasn't that offensive t or trees and then he came back and then Muhammad went again and where did they take my dad from and then my dad says that c You drove the car and then I ran through the fence and wanting the bushes really met his other two boys Andrew and Michael.
I'm putting names in English and I'm saying hey boy come over. I went to them and then we walked out a few minutes later. We had a shot and then we saw them go through the bush around the bush we were hiding it. I went to the next house. and then mike and andrew took my arm to go and then i say let me go see my dad im not going to see my dad i meant blood down and i say dont let me go and i came home and i never knew anything about the rest of our family since then so i keep moving with them at some point we ended up in another school far away from home and from that day to this day in a genocide i lost the truck the only thing that was against in my mind a day before suit suit a wide rosary where I put it for a second so you know it's a rosary right chalet right so my mom gave me Rosie I come from a Catholic family and so she gave me a lot of things but you know the rose already gave me a rosary so you know catholics sometimes tell all this kind of stuff i still don't know but the only thing i was saying god please help me see my mom before i die or please god and because the thing is we knew i was sure that he knew he was at some point going to be murderous ado, but I really wanted to die near my mother and because I didn't know, but again, because I was a kid, I didn't know how the bullet really works.
I thought maybe after he killed my dad he went through and then you know, kind of remote so he beep and then find my dad and kick him and dad and pick everyone for that and so I said maybe he's dying maybe not. I wasn't quite sure and another day I forget and then I'll ask God I really don't know if or maybe in the next hour they'll find me and kill me and through this p articular school and this is what maybe the end of a would say post is when andrew and michael gave me to another family and then the school was attacked and then they shot in the air everyone runs in a school and then the killers killed everyone in the field and the sinister static in the classrooms so in the classrooms , you know, you have records and you put the desk so we can have a free space to put the mattress to keep everyone I was the last class and they kicked in our door they tell everyone to get out and while everyone was getting out I was trying to get in the same door and get out but I can hear people outside some are being choked by machetes very creepy sound and I say you know I don't want to I don't want to get macheted let me wait a bit well, everyone is dating.
I got out behind and I want to hide under the mattress, but I was breathing and I thought maybe these guys would come and and and and see that I'm breathing and th find me and then I try to move from under the mattress. I tried to jump out of a window because there was also a girl in the room who was probably my age. she was so braveshe just jumped like a superhero and a jumper outside and she came out but i mean i tried three times and fell on the ice and i'm not going to do this and went to hide in a hole in some records so i could just put these on and annihilate the shoes and legs on a bench so it's clearly seen that i'm hiding here but the rest of my body is easy so i spent there one night the next day the assassins came to take the properties and they took everything and i still have my rosary counting, oh god please help me i don't want to be found and somehow i feel like a god hasn't always answered my prayers. from my son and then I say oh my god and he came and pulled my shoes and then I pulled my leg and then he called Moringa Moringa had a monkey of coca catechins like there was a snake that's still alive here and well, but hinga comes, I appear and put my hands.forgive me, I say, okay, forgive me, I say where you are from and spontaneously I say that I am from the north and from the north or from Rwanda, maybe that other one here is known, as you know, very extremist , so I almost tell them and one of them. and don't kill me so they would believe it they took me with them as the genocide progressed I ended up in the Congo when I sentenced these guys and with them they keep going with them the journey goes on and on but when the genocide came, we finished, I went back to Rwanda sometimes in 1995 and now i update the memories and everything in dates and times and then i reunited with my sister who raised me ever since which keeps me going and i am sure i share this with many orphans after i the general said that's another story too if i tell or take possibly another but most of the time the very mechanism i think i share with a lot of randoms for a year today was to build some kind of strength and i hope you know i hope or such time he started out of hope and the strength and the strength to keep trying to keep pushing and pushing and the hope that maybe one day life will be better and then in my experience life was better and that's why and I'm here today sharing in my story and thank you very much.
I'd like to invite our panel members to introduce themselves now and while I'm introducing you, dr. I'm culpo ganda hamana is from Rwanda also a young man who lived near ND near where the university was and comes from a mixed heritage one of the questions that always comes in handy can't you tell who is a Hutu who is a Tutsi? no you can't many times and oddly enough I come from a mixed background and we'll hear his story briefly below Carl Wilkens served as director of the extra row in Rwanda during this time he chose to send his family home and write genocide in Rwanda saving lots of orphans and others distributing food and taking care of them there and then Carl will share his story towards the end so let's go and have a seat here. thank you dr.
Hutt and thank you Emmanuel for your bravery to come here and tell us your story and Emmanuel's story is very representative, it really shows the kind of experience that people are going through for about three months, from the month of April 1994 to the final. I think until June, so I'm not going to say much, but I'll give you a little introduction of what the situation was just before the genocide briefly what the situation was during the genocide and what the situation was after the genocide and I'll tell you a little bit about some of my relatives who were lost during the genocide so i was about 12 years old in 1994 when the genocide started again i remember what precipitated the events was the shooting of the president it was down at that time i mean there have been episodes of genic violence before but nothing on the scale of what happened after the president's plane was shot down so my take is that even though the president I know was shot down it shouldn't have been an excuse to start attacking people of Tutsi descent and kill them, that was just a lame excuse, so today we condemn without any excuse that the plane was shot down and that was the excuse to kill people, p or what we do not accept it. that reason why we condemn the murder is wrong no matter what precipitated it so I just want to make that point clear and right before the genocide as I remember it there was so many political activities in so many political parties that were in opposition over there. there was some kind of power-sharing negotiation between the ruling party and so many opposition parties and that ended up turning into genocide when there was no compromise and the Tutsis started getting attacked. being killed and finally what was a process to make our country democratic that turned into a genocide against the Tutsi so the unfortunate story of one and we can't do anything about it so right after the plane was shot down there was a war between the Rondon rebels and the government forces at the time the war escalated and the genocide also escalated and then there was a mass exodus of refugees from the eastern part of the country you also know it was the waste and you know there was war there was a mass exodus of refugees there was total chaos lack of order lack of law and then people just kill others and they won't come to notice it shouldn't be noted that i won't be responsible for that so those were the difficult moments of our country as I remember it and I can remember my family going through that period in which we had to kill our relatives, so they killed some us of my first relatives.
It was my grandmother, her name was Maria Calera, she died because she couldn't run away, she was old, that's how my grandfather is, they all died in the first few months, there was also my, my, my grandmother on my father's side. uncle in us was killed and today the way i choose to remember them is to remember their values ​​you know what they believed in what they hold dear? So starting with my grandmother, she valued education so much. hard to make sure your kids were educated and today that motivated me to go to school from, you know, bachelors to now and my other person who inspired me was my uncle yeah he was a high school teacher so today i am so happy to be a teacher here at loma linda and other places i have been teaching before because that keeps me going his spirit his love of teaching keeps me going so that is the way i choose to remember the world what were his values ​​and how can I keep his spirit moving so that the genocide ended in Iran in July 1994 and some of us, you know, went through the ordeal of Emanuel this year as a survivor and we're trying to get our dignity back, our value so the most important thing we need to do is be able to work together and unite and that is the theme in Rwanda remember to unite and we want to foster peace so I am very happy to meet Emanuel ho and and and I am very happy with your work and I support your dream of reaching many other projects to be able to join a dance thanks thanks to your honor Mobley you may have caught on that you started as a high school science teacher but ended up doing a PhD at the Purdue University and pharmaceutical chemistry and now he's on our faculty here in the Faculty of Pharmacy I was thrilled to have him the next one I had turned to Carl Wilkens Carl has an amazing story I chose to write about the genocide in Kigali and protect whoever I could protect food and others, he was the later director at the time based at the development agency in Rwanda we have had his story several times here at Norma Linda's chapel it is an inspiring story of courage in the face of incredible challenges so Carl thank you for being here with us thank you understood me connected me Thank you very much everyone for coming tonight, many of you can appreciate when I say that 25 years is not like anything.
I spend a lot of time with high school students, high school college students, and of course, 25 years can seem like an eternity, but to many. of us can remember 25 years ago very clearly very clearly and to know that they have come together tonight in an act of support and solidarity means a lot means a lot to me means a lot to my brother Emanuel mob you know it's interesting, I always say that in Rwanda all the world is connected dr. the mafia was my father he actually worked with me as a nurse in one of the clinics he was a little man he was telling me tonight at dinner he remembered when i came and spoke at a church there and said boy you're making me feel good now if you could tell me what i talked about that day then me but not Rwanda that interconnectedness in Rwanda is really a little snapshot of how we are connected as a human race what do you say? 7 degrees, you know. meet someone and then someone and they'll know and this shared humanity is, I think, one of the most important things to hold onto when we're trying to understand something like genocide because genocide speaks powerfully against the idea of ​​genocide. of shared humanity speaks powerfully to the idea that my world would be better without you in this kind of exclusive problem solving and in Rwanda people try to figure out how and what and you've heard the different stories that you know some people wanted I, simplistically, would like to say: Oh Rhonda, isn't that where you Jews were killing Tutsis and no extremists were killing there?
But I loved the photo they put there of Katherine Emmanuel and the legacy that this lady had there, unfortunately, she was not in the majority if she had been in the majority, the genocide would not have happened, but we do not lose sight of those people that they really understood what shared humanity really meant. Rwanda is the country where there are these groups called Hutu and Tutsi, but they are not. Hutu and Tutsi are the ones who intuit that they are married together Rwanda is a story of political turmoil tearing relations apart and today we don't have to talk long or hard to try to explain about the political turmoil tearing relations apart so what can we learn from this story from rwanda where 25 years ago almost a million people were killed mainly tutsi tribe there was no question in mind if you were tutsi you were marked as the enemy but if you were married if you sympathized somehow you wouldn't agree according to the murderers they also marked you and then my wife and I moved to Rwanda we had one more photo there you are going to show us Emmanuel I love to ask you that during the question and answer time I love to look at these photos although Emmanuel sent and some of them they are really hard to see also this is one of the churches you know dr.
Hart, you mentioned people coming to churches, mainly Catholic churches, that's where people ran. I was there with the Adventist development relief agency of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. I used to ask why they don't come to Adventist churches. outnumbered, but there were also these Catholic fathers and sisters who didn't come to Rwanda for a six-year mission term or came for life, they spoke Kinyarwanda and there was that combination of spirituality and God and the international community that was often portrayed in these churches where the people in 1994 were no longer there, we are no longer safe, this is a funny image for me because today I am my father's age in that image, that is our family in 1994 we thought that the war was over we had had three years of war in the country in addre we had received $300,000 from Canada we were rehabilitating health centers saluting in the hope that people almost a million people lions who had been driven from their homes by three years of war in Rwanda who wanted go home and when they came back they would find medical care and other facilities so my father had a financial background and he was there help done with that project it was a lot of money in a short time my mother came to visit there and the sunday before they shot down the plane we went camping in lake evil that sunday was easter sunday this is this it is very difficult to understand how sunday easter sunday easter you know over 80% of the country is in church many of the genocide planners are in church and on thursday some of them will be killing those who were sitting next to them in church on sunday but this is not something that it's going to happen in 3 or 4 days like that and Emanuel alluded to that process of changing our ways of thinking.
As I try to find out how someone is doing because in Rwanda, super generous, you come to their house and they. I'll give you literally they took off their shirts they offered you drinks that took days to earn just to pay for a bottle of Fanta and they gave it to you generously how they went from generous to murderers how does that happen and today where would I like to go with you and then and then we'll open for a little question and answer session, how do you come back? Is it possible to go back from being an overly generous killer again? interesting to be here at Loma Linda University is this idea of ​​neural pathways how we build the pathways that build enemies we see the people who were once our neighbors we now see them as enemies we see people in the idea of ​​shared humanity but then we see them as a threat and our ability to buildroads to finally take the life of our neighbor can also be used to build roads. and we listen to the stories what we often question what I often question is can they come back if possible or some people have gone too far so tonight I won't I won't take the time to go into the history of what we were doing I'll just just say that when all the embassies decided that everyone should go, all the foreigners should go and they said, hey, the president's plane just sat down.
I don't think it's a good idea for us to fly out of here. don't bring any Rwandan s-- well, those who are planning the genocide we rightfully condemn them for killing people based solely on their ID card, but we, known to many as the leaders of the free world, are making up our minds that we can you if they are Ugandan ok if they have a document showing via Uganda they can get in your car but if they are Rwandan no and it will be up to you and your questions who could have stood up to these genocide planners . if it is the United Nations with 2,500 soldiers there if r their church leaders have massive influence in the country who are the leaders if it is educational is who could have stood up to them but which one is my My wife and I knew a young woman who had lived and worked in our home for almost four years, who loved our children, who we all loved.
A young man who came at night as a watchman. he would be killed and we were sure there was no doubt in our minds so when the embassy said no you had to go but you can't bring any Rwandans so my wife and I went into the room we talked we prayed and we came to the decision that I will stay, there is a huge privilege that foreigners had in this country, maybe I can use that privilege for the sake of these two people in our house and I will present it to my wife in a moment here because me like i was thinking today and sharing here and this time to come together and remember what happened in Rwanda this time to come together and examine how we come together how we come together this time to come together and renew those are the three words that the Rwandan government is raising specifically Allied this year but every year remember to join and renew I wrote a little piece I love my wife's piano plane she is an amazing pianist so I have to find a piano here tonight because I want to Know that she always wants me to be a part of it and since I don't sing I wrote a little poem that I'll share with you in a moment tonight here I say as we go into our question and answer time but Theresa is taking the kids to Nairobi eventually. i will stay in the country those two people in our house will not be killed i will start working with some of the people who are now in prison for genocide i will work with the potential for good and evil in all of us i will work with some of the people who are planning genocide I will end up working with my Rwandan my direction Rwandan colleagues two men who had Tutsi wives their ID card would allow them to get through the barricades I will work with them two men to bring food, water and medicine to three groups of orphans ns but where I wanted to go with you tonight before we start our question and answer time was to go back to Rwanda every year usually with teachers last summer I was there with teachers and high school students this is Charlotte standing in front of 40 men you have confessed to killing to their neighbors and they want to go home, so they're in what I would call a reinvention camp here this is where my limited understanding of neural pathways is starting to kick in and help me try to figure out what's going on here is it possible you know we have paths very strong paths they say the more we fire a path the stronger it gets stronger than the outer coding you know my coats lead the mile in the siding the stronger it becomes and for years i shot genocidal rapist road killers but now that they are given the chance to do projects in the country to rebuild the country to build roads to make radical terraces to make bricks to build schools other little roads are f born and we have a choice let's burn down those little roads and let them get bigger these guys there isn't a fence there isn't a wall around this so i can't really call it a field of forced labor the guards have no weapons rwanda said ok we have three levels after the genocide those who plan tier one those who really were mid tier make it happen the organizers of tier two and the common people of tier three so these camps are just tier three people ok and we don't have time to get into the other parts, but these people are there after having confessed after going through a process called gotcha the director of the largest orphanage there on the right others some of you perhaps who follow the humans from New York who presented him last October lo blew up They did about seven articles on other people's posts about him and his story during the genocide. earn the truth those tapes that have been playing in your mind for years how my family died what were the details that brought some more truth to those tapes and helped people begin to process that the young man to their left was a young child who was there will probably be your age Emmanuel I guess he could have been around nine years old at the time of the genocide and he was one of the kids in the biggest orphanage we worked with today he is a music teacher there after-school programs that happen in that orphanage but the men back here i was telling you about are free to go to church on the weekend if they want they have ten days every year to go home for a wedding or funeral this little roads idea ma'am maybe one one of those guys when he comes to church he is an amazing singer huh little way in my brain or am i just going to shoot the way no he is a killer i have much more control over the cam Let us know that I can build one of the children who wrote to me, which of the schools I can go to, he says, while looking at the history of Rwanda, I realized that if we only define people by one path, aren't we strengthening that path? and slowing down all other avenues for Rwanda to be giving people who committed genocide many, many different opportunities to reinvent themselves and the people who survive to reinvent themselves as well and I'd love to explore that with you but before I do I just want to share this little poem and Theresa if you wouldn't mind just some music and I usually have an offer for a while just to let her play.
In fact, I shut up just to let her play for me. We'll see where the volume settings are there as we do. explore these three these three probably have the volume and the PA booth for you go ahead and start yeah he's coming he's come if they got the power they'll turn the volume up maybe a little bit but I can hear you these three realms we might call them remember unite renew I want to strengthen that path every time I shoot let's remember unite renew remember unite renew but I don't want to remember it's too painful you know I have to move on I have to leave the past in the past unite unite with who the people who killed my family they killed my best friend's wife impossible Renu I would love I would love to renew but but since I have nothing it's much worse than starting from scratch it's impossible these three remember to unite renew they can actually combine their voices in a trio in a harmony of three parts a harmony so masterfully woven so powerful it has to be heard across the planet a planet that is howling in twisted pain going into conflict wasting away in despair remember unite renew remembering we know why coming together is our best choice bring out the best in ourselves in unity we form a foundation for healing for hope for renewal and in renewal we honor those we remember their legacy continues Alive and Shine Remember Unite Renew These three have been elbowing each other since the dawn of time, weaving in and out of each other's realms, both in silence and in searing proclamations, and when we close our eyes for the last time, we'll only have begun to understand. the power in this woven cord of three.
I just started to see how the impossible became possible because of our choices. I believe that this love, this love that feeds, empowers and nourishes, remembers, unites, renews. We find it in this process of finding the good. Remember, unite, renew. path of choice go ahead and renew my yes renew for me is set and find the good thank you honey ok we like to spend the next 20 minutes taking answers questions comments i think you got the message up there how to text where my team gone but somehow i'm going to get those text messages and see if there are any answers up there go ahead hi dr.
Hart, so I'm going to start with the Jays' biggest question: where can we find the movie? The movie is on Vimeo. If you go, google Kimora. you will find it there is a full version everyone has to kimura to heal kom ura to heal is a vimeo movie you can pick up and see what do you think we can learn from this today when we see something so strong divided in our country u.s. politics who would like to answer it would you repeat the question one more time? what can we learn from her in the US? today from this experience which is Tefillin well I think as I was wondering you know the first time I think it's like a perspective of us Africans how we see America as the role model in a democracy in human rights so for me it will be very catastrophic if you go down the same path as the runners because there is kind of a trend I'm sorry I'm not judging you Society that you here in the West see the legacy of civil wars or violence mass atrocities as the ones that are in Africa but I think there is an area with dr.
Hill and Jim and if they can learn that what happened with Wonder happened before us fifty years before us in the Holocaust against the teachers, even after Wonder, there are so many other civil wars and mass atrocities, mass murder within Africa. Oh, in other places, I think there's a very strong lesson for lambda2 what happened to us is not a crisis of our own in London, it's another crisis that ended, therefore it's another crisis in Syria, it's a human crisis and therefore Therefore, we cannot prevent it from happening elsewhere, including here in the United States. I think that's what you Americans need to learn from those conflicts, thank you, you know, I would add to that, Emmanuel, that one of the tools to be able to do what I

learned

in Rwanda is that we don't have to be defined by what what do we do.
I often feel that we are operating from a position of scarcity and in Rwanda many people have said if I operate with what I don't have I won't operate so I look at what I have and I will be defined by what I have and I think what we have in common is much more powerful than many of the things that are dividing us and that idea of ​​looking at what we have is not defined by what we don't have is for me another really powerful tool that comes out of the history of Rwanda and in the The last thing I would mention is this idea of ​​singularly defining someone or some institution that Rwanda has shown us in its process of moving forward that it doesn't have to be defined by its past, it can be defined by what it does next, but that needs that needs an environment that is open to the next step and it takes all of us to not just trigger that one solution, but that one bad memory that we have associated with someone and we fixate on that we don't ignore it but when we shoot when we search It's the good we're not belittling we're just opening our eyes to what we have instead of just being focused on that one negative thing and so yeah That's worth throwing two cents at thanks Emmanuel.
Have humanitarian efforts been allowed to help rebuild in many ways? Yes, some have been arriving, but also like other places. history of humanitarian or rights interventions, but they don't really help a party other than taking advantage of a crisis or making things worse, but some have been able to help it and do some good things. they have come they have returned though to a very different Rwanda those who were there before returned to a very different Rwanda not only in the way it was decimated but also in a new strategy in Rwanda they said we are the leading partner which is the way that it always should have been and we have a strategy people would like to come and say oh we were working here and maybe we'll build a school here we'll do something there and the government says you're welcome and we need your association but we're the senior partner.
This is our country. We are brilliant people. We have human resources so come join us in rebuilding but understand who the lead partner is in this process and I think it's been really very good healthy really very important because when we go intooften as foreigners like we're the lead partner and we leave because we always leave followers instead of leaders and Rwanda has said that's not going to happen here and one of the ways that we're also involved during this rebuild and we're the lead partner in the empowerment of women. They said that in our new constitution 30% of our decision-making body starting from Parliament and going down will be women today in Rwanda more than 64 percent of parliament are women in Rwanda so it is rebuilding this intentionality intentional empowering women is a very different Rwanda than Rwanda people are coming back and finding their today to partner with currently there are several medical schools in Rwanda and Linda is involved to start another one in Kigali at the University there and supposed which will open in September, so education has been prominent. village in Rwanda, you know, those of you know Africa, you know the challenge of that, and yet it's a very concentrated country with a high population density, so it's probably the most connected country in all of Africa right now, yeah , i also think the medical spell i think there is still some need i believe in my big huge especially when it comes to trauma or any survivors i have so many in my own family my own brother is kind of an alcoholic well yes alcoholic yes anabolic and so much trauma so much i think people so many things i mean therapy we therapies a new concept for us just started one sorry i don't know if i'm supposed to say Bob is ok ok but he is really fascinating actually feminine but in Rwanda I don't think if any We once had therapy when I was younger I don't have today it's a wonderful book that just came out called wild about a young woman who was about your age Emmanuel during genocide and has written about the trauma afterward, but also about healing and therapy and bringing to light that this has nothing to do with shame and in the same way, we wouldn't know how to deny people medical treatment, we wouldn't. we would. deny that and diabetics his insulin we have to be aware of this segment of our lives as well and in mind state another question how successful have community courts been in mending and repairing relationships after the genocide as well as i remember after the genocide that did the government have no resources to carry out the truth of justice so they came up with a system called ChaCha which was a traditional court not justice in the modern sense so in church people go to together and they will try to remember what happened who killed who and then ask for forgiveness you know it would be on thursday afternoon did you as a young man witness this?
I remember at least often I heard that they would close the school on Thursday afternoon they closed the shop, they would go to the local soccer field and some who were willing to confess would confess in front of the community, did you attend any of those katachi, yes I attended, I attended a couple of them, of course my situation is different because I. I lived outside of Rwanda for a long time since 1996. We moved from London because my family wanted to go to a country where we could speak English and be able to get educated in English, so I'll go back and forth from Kenya and run and every time I come back, yeah, I was attending some of those, and reconciliation happened at the community level through the church because there just weren't enough resources to help people get justice through the modern sense of justice. ice, so at this time people have been able to reconcile.
I don't think a Daan at this point really that animosity isn't there anymore, maybe a few cases here and there, but generally they aren't, no animosity and little chance of genocide happening again because people have learned that the consequences of a genocide can be very, very bad so i think there is some level of reconciliation an appreciable level of reconciliation another really important part about katachi was people learning where family members were buried in their final hours they have this idea of ​​what we don't know we think of stories and so we fill in what we don't know with our imagination and gotcha helped bring the truth out you know those who confessed were given half their prison sentence halved, so some people would say oh, what's great that you know they're really sincere in their confession, but but there's more to the confession than if?
Simply, whether you believe the person is sincere or not, those who want to know the truth about what happened to their family members are a really important part of that healing process of stopping that tape that has been playing incessantly in your mind as you begin to learn something of the truth. about it and moving on are the first steps to moving forward in this healing process it's a brilliant thing you know restorative justice isn't easy if it was easy we'd all be doing it huh it's complicated and it's open to - what if when you take advantage of something, it's open to abuse in different ways it's not neat and tidy but Rwanda is powerfully showing us how it's possible for that to happen another cup of course what are some good ways to support those living through genocide? there I think there are many many many ways to help I think most of us some of us who are children are now growing up creating small projects especially in the towns you know providing good medical care gu That is where they can or the means to access good health care if you guys have a project to go and Rwanda take a little place in Rwanda set up something that maybe helps them make a little income for them because they know a profit is still something I mean yeah I mean that life needs to be improved in many ways especially in survivor communities but i think in my personal opinion the main danger that we see that we face is trauma and memories and there is no proper way to deal with trauma or you know because I mean we are now, I guess when we talk about Rwanda, we tend to give a broad picture of how the country has come along, but when it's Inside the families that are confronted, by the way, not only for the survivors but also for them. perpetrators that is confused because I think we are both a partnership as we all engage ourselves in a new way and both sides need healing, both sides need proper therapy.
I don't I don't know but you know this genocide even the death of a person and a family something really yes but now the whole community we have lost the sense of humanity now we are trying to be human not because we didn't but I think I guess while doing the interviews I never thought that I would face someone who possibly killed my family, but I did it anyway, so I realized that these people suffer the way that I suffer and these people who think before Before they came to kill my family, they were already dead, so you can look them in the eye.
I didn't want to judge them, but you can see when someone tells you that I killed 12 people in a family and then I said to say 'I'm crying because they lost mine. I cried because I lost my parents, but this guy killed him and now he's living with it. Just think about it. I don't know what drugs that is for. I don't know if it's something we said. now its 25 years and this person has been cured oh me even them speaking today that they have been cured. I have my own to face it. I have opportunities taking advantage of most of London in the rural areas where I am from.
I never got even with Kigali. to make every human being function again I don't know, but I remember the first time that Emanuel expressed words of empathy to me for those who perpetrated the genocide and it is one thing theoretically to say that but it is another thing for someone who has experienced the pain that you have experienced to sit here and tell us that they are suffering the way that you are suffering, that is, that is beyond that, those are some of some of the most humane things that someone can say and I think you are part of that medicine in the healing part when you can - honestly from your heart say something like that that's not a cliché little phrase that's touching to me maybe one or two more emanuel what is your dream for the future and C and tell us the story of how you were able to study in the usa being an orphan my dream my future dreams i want to be someone different i want to be someone you know i love marvel movies i'm 34 but i dream of having a super power and saving the world it's crazy, so i have a very childish dream but mostly it's to see myself try to be a superhero serving people in danger fly somewhere i serve someone and do all these hollywood movie clichés but i want to be someone established i have a family of my own i think having a child of my own or making myself happy i guess the way i came to america there is no practical way to say but to fantasize i have always loved america so much and i started to learn english i didnt even get down to what i was going to be, but I meant through a lot of people through what I've been doing and wandering around really good people, American people that have been supporting me since that day in and day out and I'll be one of them it's no secret and in many o Plus I have so many American dads and moms and aunts and and and and it's a very long drive so I don't know how to sum that up yeah thank you one thing I might add he said the film school in Los Angeles gels and the neighborhood is not. always the easiest and there was a moment during that time when someone held him at knife point and I thought to myself seriously, you know, seriously, but Emmanuel told me the story that he talked about this man who was a vet who I was suffering, I'm sure, from PTSD and the empathy that I heard you share with Emmanuel is that you told me that story, it just struck me because most of the time, for me, I'm thinking about myself and my safety and maybe the injustice committed against me or something, but I hear you say you know you want to change and I'm like no part of me, right?
We love your spirit of empathy and compassion and that is just an incredible inspiration. I had the privilege of being with Emmanuel at a high school. before and the children asked him h how are you doing you know and what is your response Emmanuel when people ask you how are you doing how are you doing just have hope that is moral a bit different pray I am a great believer so I hate to think that my family suffered and it's going to a bad place and i always believed that god loved my family that's there in a better place and i hope i get to meet them one day so yeah thank you i don't know if i ever plan to do something you did and i might not remember that we don't always remember what we said, but I remember you telling those high school kids every morning that you have to make a decision absolutely every single day.
I guess I have to remind myself that today is going to be different from yesterday. and then when I started it was very difficult because it was like believing in a false hope, how are you going to move when your brother is an alcoholic and your neighbors and everything in your neighborhood, all the same, poverty, but again we woke up. you myself in the mirror myself in the mirror and tell me today is going to be good today is going to be a different part of my life as i go along and it has been a part of my life ever since thanks to the senate.
Be a quick announcement for you guys. This is part of the world affairs council. We have a local chapter. I like Peggy and Jim Hill. They both stand up. Peggy is our program manager for the world affairs council and she helps put in to get a number to make sure that on record we'll put you on the list to get notices of future meetings and then there's one why don't I let you tell the next week there will be particular interest, we knew in advance that the idea of ​​restorative justice would come up and that we would have people in the audience who were interested in working with others with these issues in mind, so I spent some time looking at Who are they?
People with a lot of wisdom in that area and they talked to Facing History and ourselves who recommended talking about restorative justice and working on that together so if there are people in the room who are working with others I would highly recommend coming to the The Next Thursday's program is called Genocide Strategies That Heal Societies After Conflict and I have some handouts that were at the front desk when you signed up. Some of you may have picked it up there. I'll leave some here. the reception and we invite you to come and join, thank you and thank you to dr.
Hart and the group that we had here there couldn't be a better world affairs council program than to have one with people who were involved at these different kinds of levels and brought this kind of knowledge to the table. It's very rare so I'm glad a lot of you participated let's thank our panel thank you all good evening

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