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Forged iron skillet - blacksmithing

Mar 05, 2022
It's mid-May and even though it snowed last night and it's freezing cold and winter in the shop today, summer is coming up and that means it's campfire cooking season and what better thing to use over the campfire than a small hand

forged

skillet

that's already i have a piece of round plate that was cut off I think this is something that was cut off from a larger project and at one point my steel shop had loads of this kind of thing so you might want to look around to see if they have it , it's nicely cut I don't have to worry about grinding it to shape it this way it's eight inches in diameter or about 200 millimeters in diameter and it's about 12 gauge thick so it's about three millimeters thick something so now this will fit on the door my gas Forge and that will be absolutely the easiest way to heat everything.
forged iron skillet   blacksmithing
It's much easier if it's completely hot when you forge it. The eight inch stock is a bit heavier than I would normally use 14 gauge. It's pretty good. It's done on a 16 gauge but that's a bit light and the larger pans on a thin one should be really nice now as part of today's video. I'm running an experiment with some newer camera equipment. I bought a 22mm manual focus manual aperture lens that is on. the little camera I'm using right now so I'm trying a few more manual settings trying to explore that and I just want to see what it looks like if this doesn't look great you might see me on this camera over here which is your regular Sony Handycam, in case it doesn't get a good picture.
forged iron skillet   blacksmithing

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forged iron skillet blacksmithing...

I'm also experimenting with a different microphone. I'm testing the road go microphone, which is a very small transmitter-receiver microphone. I don't need the cable I've always hung on but just in case I still have the lavell err mic for the road link wireless lab which is a little fancier mic system but I'm having some issues with the cable snagging stuff and they get pulled out and sometimes it causes problems so we can go back and forth between these a bit today right now we recorded both and i'll see an edit if one is really good one is really bad I can still go back the other one if it doesn't work very well now to work on this I'm going to go over the bottom end of an old oxygen cylinder and I'm going to start by combing it I don't start by creating a plane down this is a technique I learned from Jim Hoffman there's a lot of colonial reproduction work you just want to go slow now this It has a small flaw on the bottom and I wanted to make sure that's on the outside and not on the inside where it will cause food to stick you can set up a mechanical hammer ico to serve these up I press or hydraulic press be careful not to go too far too fast or you'll end up putting waves on it and then you'll get little cold hits and it's a real problem to deal with but the heavier plate alleviates some of that, so it is Getting there, I think we can dig a little deeper.
forged iron skillet   blacksmithing
We're not quite deep in our form, but now a point. I had experimented with a shape that actually had a shape for the pan and you have worked the pan on the outside of the shape it had a great C-clamp type arrangement you would heat the edge with a torch you would lean a bit but that always left little creases that they left little creases it was really a lot of work to make it work once Jim showed me this technique there was no going back to that old way because not only is this quicker and easier it results in a better product but it is one less piece that you have to leave on the shop floor to trip over so many things if you just take your time, unload the scale and find a time when there is no reason to forward that then ideally this would be smooth and polished but rarely they get a little hotter and then we'll be good to serve now while we're doing this.
forged iron skillet   blacksmithing
I'm going to talk a little bit about the different microphones. I am or should I say that I am going to switch back and forth as we edit between the different mics at this point. 4G noise better worse is annoying or more than the other mic so now let's switch to the rodelink filmmaker kit which is my old lab mic let's see how it performs under the same circumstances that's pretty good so this is still the long way the wired lab mic that goes to a transmitter and then to the camera and now let's go back to the route that just has a mic on the transmitter that goes directly to the camera that's really a big difference between the route now going back Hit the road Lake Wireless which is a bigger and more expensive system and I have trouble snagging the mic cable from time to time and it has disconnected multiple times has caused some real issues on videos so now back to the march because it does not. you don't have a cable it might solve some of those issues but you do have the slightly larger transmitter here and the mic probably isn't as high quality so we're just looking at what's the difference between these two mics which one?
I'll continue with the video, I'll decide when I'm done with editing. I discovered another advantage of the small path. I can still look at the diopter on this camera to check my focus on the anvil and with that. bigger mic the transmitter is about this big it hangs over the back far enough It wouldn't be a big deal this gets a lot of heat so even with these hot cum mitts my knuckles would get hot before we were done with this. of your pan they're going to be and that's just as far as what you want in your pan you also go in here like this and start to stop that RIM a little bit more it's one of these things that as you work on one area you'll end up needing to correct another area and back back and forth back and forth back and forth you can go back to the bottom of the cylinder to refine some of that we need to be careful not to deflate what we've started now you want to try and get this edge even by all accounts whether you need a straight sided pan or not really depends on how you view your skills, it's much easier to stick a spatula in there if it's not straight sided I guess if you were making pans by the hundreds.
I only have a fly pressed die for this or a hydraulic press die. They probably just stamp them with a single push. I'm just trying to soften the edge. I'm not trying to put it all back. here again it's getting pretty close we're also looking for signs of this lip it's a little curved and flattened in a way that it's hot

forged

than it is to try to grind the inside of this out I just want to clean up the bottom a little bit more and we'll be ready to drive the First thing is to make sure it looks like you have an even lip across the width.
It's not going to hurt anything if you don't, but it looks better if you do and then we want to make sure the bottom is nice and flat and then use. the flat side of the rounding hammer here a round flat would be nice you don't want to use anything with really sharp edges these things the surface is probably rougher than you'd like on a pan anyway I think I'm pretty damn happy with it, i think it's time to put a handle on it, ok i let our pan cool and cut a piece of quarter by three quarter flat bars so it's about a 6mm by 20mm flat bar it's about eight inches. long so it's the same length as the pan and it's very important when you're making the handle think about leverage if you get a really long handle that's good for keeping your hand away from the flame you'll have enough leverage that you could making the pan tilt, being a heavier pan I use sometimes is going to be less likely to do that so this handle shouldn't over balance it, but it's something to keep in mind. right there, that will be the part that will be attached to the pan.
I'll cut it down to about a half inch here and then we'll tuck it back a little bit having that shoulder. I can hook it over the edge. of the anvil makes it pretty easy to work with that's really all I need to do right now I'm going to clean this up a bit and then we'll extend that back part leaving a little thicker than the original thickness but not very clean that shoulder up a little more symmetrical and even s are before you start spreading better spread all over and around the edges of this so its more comfortable ok you want to hold a pan here by this part of the handle though next thing i want do is extend the small end. this is actually this will be a place that i put two rivets next to each other on the pan, so it makes a nice stable handle for that.
I'm just going to go to the cross and you can put a little shoulder on this. don't think it needs it, you'll need just a little bit of filing or grinding to clean it up, but that will be enough support for the pan, switch to some ja-slaughtering tongs and we'll pull the other end out, I just want to continue this taper and then I'll offset this, draw a little tail and make a little curl so you can hang it if you want to use a pair of JA slotted pliers that fit a little better it seems I don't have a pair of the prong always going to try these worth having a bunch of tom options let's s read a bit made a very similar handle several times in the past roll out the nice square taper and then we'll round it out take our square and forge it into an octagon octagon and round it out I also want to go ahead and strongly chamfer the corners in this also because this is the part that you will be holding you really need to feel comfortable there is nothing wrong with going back and filing a bit on this it starts with just a little curl at the end here.
I'll set that up a bit, we can start this here on the anvil, do it over the horn where it feels most comfortable, have the ring go ahead and put my touch mark on what looks like it should be the bottom of the handle I want to start this with two punch marks in the center to pierce the rivets. Now I'm going to drill these four-eighths rivets. I think it's strong enough for a pan this size. Now even though I'm going to put this on the outside, it's easier to drill my holes from the inside so it's g I'm going to mark them on the inside.
Just see the silver pencil mark. If you're not comfortable with your mark, just drill, rivet, and then go back and drill the second hole to do it, but since I want to do this. from the marking from the inside and the rivets from the outside doing it this way now I'm just going to hand hold this under the drill but I know from past experience that I can stop this drill the strap slides on very easily and I I'm not worried about you grabbing me and pulling this out of my hand if you're not that familiar with your gear or you know your gear is much stronger than you are, find a way to hold onto it or use a hand drill on this.
It will probably be more secure but I'm not concerned with this drill press it's a little annoying it's just that it stops so easily the eight inch rivets are light enough to leave it cold no need to heat it up and I just want it to start the first one and then i want t to put the second rivet in which i think i just hit the ground somewhere in there i can't believe i found that in the dirt floor now if you look at this because it's curved it doesn't lay flat and if try to put that rivet in like this, it'll cause problems, so with the rivet in there, just make sure things hold up. use a little monkey tool to make sure it's really set then I can do that rivet I'm just doing this by hand I like the headset look at a rivet you want a really nice head go ahead use a rivet setter now that's a functional pan but I think we need to put some shape on the hand board start with I'm going to heat it up right here where it transitions just give it some shape that might be all you really want for your hand.
I think I would like to put a little curve on that pill and for that we will go to the forge, I just want the handle not to be hot. I don't want to heat the place where I just clinched. This depends on your personal aesthetic. I think that's all I want to do. Our

skillet

ended up with a five and a half inch base. the inch and a half sides so it's that metric which is about oh about 140 millimeters around with a flat section at the bottom and about 35 millimeters high somewhere somewhere that's not exact and varies just kinda it's hand forged it has a unique character we like to use little pans like this to heat up tortillas when we make tacos and I'll probably get a chance to try that in the next day or two but in the meantime I hope you can head out to his shop be safe wear your safety glasses see you next time

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