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Doctor Reacts to NHL WORST Injuries - Part 1

Jan 26, 2022
if that puck had been just an inch in a different direction you're probably blind if you didn't lose your entire eye welcome everyone i'm dr brian suter and this is your number one source for learning about the unique medical side of the world of sports we are finally taking a look at some hockey content and so in this series i am going to react and break down some of the most notorious

injuries

in nhl history now make sure you are subscribed because this is only the first

part

there are too many Injuries to cover in video The first is Mark Stahl in 2013.
doctor reacts to nhl worst injuries   part 1
Let's take a look at the team in a look that hit a body. oh boy He hit a ranger overhead. the injury of course was due to the puck going wide on this shot eventually coming up and stopping on the face if you look at this angle here when the slap shot comes in the middle of your screen changing direction it's tough actually see where the puck is here we're going to look closely this might have been able to spin fast enough to catch it on the cheek that might have been so that's where we can see of course the puck and the post ends from being hit.
doctor reacts to nhl worst injuries   part 1

More Interesting Facts About,

doctor reacts to nhl worst injuries part 1...

This image really captures exactly what happened here. We can see the puck that clearly went up and honestly in this view it looks like it made direct eye contact with stahl. Look at this slow motion clip, where we can see the puck come up here and hit him right in the eye. as if you were lucky that the disk appeared to hit a little higher up just above your eye, if this had been about an inch lower directly in front of the orbit you are probably blind, if you are unlucky you even keep eye stahl suffered an orbital fracture so let's take a look at our biodigital anatomy to understand more about that by looking at the skull here and what i've basically done is highlight all the different bones that are considered orbit all the bones there's not just an orbital bone, it's basically a collection of bones that make up the entire socket where the eyeball is located, a fracture in any of these bones in that orbital socket will be considered an orbital fracture now one of the big dangers with this is that we have many muscles that control our different eye movements that are here in this space and those muscles can be damaged or pinched along with the nerves which can drastically affect the motor function of the eye as well as vision itself.
doctor reacts to nhl worst injuries   part 1
Fortunately, when Stahl returned, he at least wore an eye shield to reduce the risk of future injury. Next up, 2008 Richard Zednick, let's take a look. There's a Joachim hit on MacArthur. we can't really see much in terms of what happened here on screen if we just look at this guy here at first glance it didn't really look like anything that bad happened in terms of trauma so now if we look at a different view here, we can see what happens so here's zednick skating into the game here and if you look at the other player on his team basically his skate blade comes out and essentially just cuts him. almost like the sharp exhaust that goes right into that

part

of zednick's neck zednick suffered a laceration to the common carotid artery we can see the big scar he had from where that skid essentially pierced his neck and hit that carotid artery he also supposedly got five pints of blood when he was in the hospital and just to give you some reference the human body is basically between eight and twelve pints so he essentially had to replace almost half of his blood with this resuscitation the common carotid artery sits right in the front of our neck next to the jugular vein the jugular vein was what clint malarchuk had cut when he had his injury something important to remember about veins versus arteries is that the arteries are carrying the blood that is oxygenated from the heart to the rest of the body instead of the veins are delivering blood that has been depleted and oxygen has been taken out of the body back to the heart this means when this cuts off the artery that will prevent blood from getting to the brain which will certainly be very serious when such a serious injury occurs literally every second counts and therefore the fact that number one Zednick was able to skate off the ice and number two the medical staff was there ready to apply compression, he definitely put things away here until the medical staff was able to come in and stitch up that cut in the artery.
doctor reacts to nhl worst injuries   part 1
Next we flash back to 2004 and certainly one of the most well known incidents in single period hockey history steve moore and the hit he took from todd bertuzzi his shoulder has a little chat with him grabs his sweater he hits him and it piles into that rainy collision and everyone's in on it. Now we have a lion fight, so we can't immediately see exactly what happened here. todd bertuzzi basically grabbed steve moore from behind and hit him full on the side of the face when he wasn't expecting it and that brought the other part of this down as well, not just the punch but also when moore's head just hits against the ice who will also be just as likely to cause a major head injury now, unlike Anderson, who just suffered a neck ligament injury. and c4 so c3 and c4 mean the third and fourth cervical vertebrae so the atlas here is the first second this is going to be the third and this is going to be the fourth the transverse process is a specific area of ‚Äč‚Äčthat bone that was fractured now, in the case of these little cervical vertebrae it's this little kind of hole this little extension that we see to the side that's the transverse process now this might not seem like a serious injury but there's a reason why our cervical vertebrae they have these holes that go up are because there's an artery that lives in that area, it's called the vertebral artery and it basically travels to the brain through that little cross hole so you can imagine if you have a fracture here. even higher risk of injuring this artery which can cause strokes and all sorts of much more serious lasting

injuries

Next up is our first cardiac event of this video 2005 and the yuri fisher incident occurred with seven and a half minutes left in the first period yuri fisher suddenly slumped while on the bench immediately the wings started calling from hard to see where he is on the bench here critical help fans and players watched and grave obvious concern as the medical staff administered so now we can see what's down here and pay attention to what it looks like the medical staff are doing because it looks like they're administering cpr cpr and a defibrillator was brought to the scene listen to your trainers explaining what happened let's listen and then explain what you mean what happened basically is a fish was out on the turn he came out of he was standing there with his coworkers team from sitting on the bench and had a seizure and fell forward and then okay so the first thing we look at every time we see an athlete collapse on the bench or on the field the first thing we think about is the heart because that will be the most life threatening and worrisome is also important when you talk about a seizure here sometimes when people have cardiac arrest they may actually show some seizure-like movements which can sometimes confuse medical staff so that people nearby not realize it's cardiac arrest and then not start CPR so it's important and we're trained to make sure that when an athlete falls we ignore the seizure-like activity and make sure to first assess the heart by checking the pulse because it could actually be coming from the heart. arrest next to him and immediately, as soon as we realized what was going on, we stopped him and immediately received medical help. in your chest and giving those rescue breaths basically when you have a cardiac arrest your heart has stopped beating and therefore you're not getting blood you're not getting oxygen to the rest of your tissues so when you do CPR and push your chest basically you're squeezing and compressing the heart to help it distribute blood throughout the body.
It's harder to stop and there was no pulse, but that's how we know we checked for a pulse. If we don't feel it, we start CPR. auto defibrillator is what it's called and they were electrocuted so the electroshock is basically trying to restore the electrical activity of the heart when someone is in cardiac arrest they usually have some type of arrhythmia where the electrical activity is abnormal and it's preventing the heart. By squeezing it, by shocking it with the defibrillator, it resets the system to restore those normal patterns, and luckily, in Fisher's case, they were able to do that next, in 2013, Dan Boyle, we're going to get out of line, but now Somoka does well.
Back to the shark end, if we look at a different view here we can see the blues player skid and basically slam him into the boards, you can see his head basically hit making a contact boom right there with the side of the ball. So in this case, Boyle had a concussion which is certainly not a minor thing, but considering the injuries we can see from a hit like this, he's very lucky any time someone has a concussion. What can often happen is that the brain is basically floating in the cerebrospinal fluid and therefore can move inside the skull, so with this impact Boyle's head basically makes contact with the wall and stops his skull. very abruptly but the brain still moves the brain slides off and hits the inside of the skull causing an additional part of that brain injury the last one conor mcdavid let's take a look i'm telling you cause a big impact where you would touch. the whole target out of place there that's terrible mcdavid had a multitude of knee injuries here probably the biggest of which could have been pcl but there was a big story we'll take a look at that sometime to the documentary he did but this is really an interesting comparison to one we'll talk about in the future which was steven stamkos breaking his tibia with a similar mechanism let's take a look from this view as mcdavid slides in here so watch that basic leg ally how you make direct contact with the boom right there on the goal post now the pcl works basically the opposite of the acl so the pcl will prevent the tibia from moving backwards relative to the femur so here when your tibia hits the goal post that post is going to produce a force that pushes the tibia back and in this case it was excessive enough to cause the pcl to tear It was now he could have very easily kind of broken the shaft of his tibia in this play just because of how much contact there was of course we know he had other soft tissue associated injuries with the other structures of the knee but it's really surprising that he didn't was severe enough to require immediate surgery.
We'll talk about Steven Stamkos. He had a similar mechanism like this. where he skidded into the pole and actually broke his tibia, so that's it for the video. Everyone is very excited to bring you some hockey content. It's another great opportunity to teach you more very unique injury patterns. I said I have at least three more of these planned so please let me know below what injuries you want to hear about etc so I can provide you with the best educational content thanks as always for watching and I'll see you next time bye

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