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Civil War Ketchup Recipe Battle - Confederate vs. Union | HARD TIMES

Civil War Ketchup Recipe Battle - Confederate vs. Union | HARD TIMES
greetings my beautiful lovely it's it's Emmy welcome back today's video is sponsored by American

battle

field trust a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to saving American

battle

fields from the Revolutionary War the war of 1812 and the

Civil

War be sure to click the link down below to learn more about their efforts and big thanks for sponsoring this video now today I'm continuing with my

hard

time series a series that I've been doing of historical

recipe

s from

times

of

hard

ship today I'm going to be making two types this is actually for two types of

ketchup

yes the ubiquitous tomato condiment that we dip our fries into these are

civil

war-era

recipe

s I'm going to be making a

Confederate

recipe

and a

union

recipe

and I'm going to taste and compare them so the idea of

ketchup

actually is an old one it's believed the name

ketchup

actually comes from a Chinese hulking word called ketsup which was actually a fermented fish sauce which is actually believed to come from Vietnam and brought to China via Chinese traders so then the British brought us the UK in the 17th and 18th century and an effort to replicate it changed it so then you start seeing ingredients like mushrooms and walnuts and that was called

ketchup

so I will put the link down below to the National Geographic article that I read where much of this information came from the first recorded

recipe

of

ketchup

containing tomato was in 1812 a

recipe

that was penned by James mies and...
civil war ketchup recipe battle   confederate vs union hard times
it contained tomatoes and sodium benzoate a preservative so then it was understood that sodium benzoate was not considered healthy in 1876 a company named Heinz came out with a tomato

ketchup

that contained more vinegar rather than sediment benzoate to preserve the

ketchup

so the rest I guess is history isn't it so American

Battle

field trust asked me to reflect on how I got into historical

recipe

s and history in general and this is a great example of how I've learned history through food I'm actually not a big history buff at all I'm just not that interested in dates and timelines but when it comes to food I am super super passionate curious and interested so through the lens of food I've learned so much history and I find it absolutely fascinating because food has allowed me this kind of portal back in time I also love the idea of creating a

recipe

and then having a tangible means to kind of go back in time I can imagine what it was like to struggle and to have to make a steak cutlet out of a grapefruit pit or having to make a meal out of banana peels I think that's one of the most important things about history is that it gives us a context it gives us a place to learn from so that we can hopefully make better decisions for our future generations so big thanks to American

battle

field Trust for sponsoring this video be sure to click the link down below and check out their website and their many apps to help people learn more about history and why it...
civil war ketchup recipe battle   confederate vs union hard times
matters alrighty let's go ahead and make us some

ketchup

so I'm gonna be making two versions of

ketchup

a

union

recipe

and a

Confederate

recipe

and I got both of them out of this book called a taste for war by William C Davis and I've referenced this book once before when I made my

hard

tack and I will put a link down below where you can find this book I just checked this out of my local library it's pretty great it's the culinary history of the blue and gray and in the back here it has lots and lots of

recipe

s so other books that I've looked at are more of

Civil

War era

recipe

s and include

recipe

s that

civil

ians might have eaten lots of baked goods and things like that as a soldier you wouldn't necessarily be making pie so this I really appreciate because there are lots of

recipe

s including the

Confederate

ketchup

and the Boston

ketchup

so these are the two

recipe

s I'll be making today both these

recipe

s of course are post 1812 and both contain tomato so it'll be a little bit more similar to what we consider

ketchup

today okay let's go ahead and get started so both of these

recipe

s are perfect for this time of year because they call for using fresh crushed tomatoes so I tested out two different versions of crushing the tomatoes first I scored the tomato skin and I boiled it and the skin and then tried crushing it and that actually did not work as well as simply taking your clean tomato and rubbing it over the course holes of a grater...
civil war ketchup recipe battle   confederate vs union hard times
and just keep grading it and grading it until you're just left with the skin okay so to prepare the

Confederate

ketchup

we're going to prepare our spices next now this

recipe

calls for both mace and nutmeg and did you know that mace and nutmeg actually come from the same fruit it's super super cool so this membrane part on the outside of this nut is the mace so you're gonna remove that and inside of that you've got a kind of nut and you crack the nut open and inside you've got a pit and that is your nutmeg so two spices are from the same fruit so I took my mace and I placed it in my mortar and pestle and I ground it into a powder then I cracked the shell and took out the Nutmeg pit and then I just grated that over a fine-toothed grater three-quarters of a teaspoon of whole peppercorns next I added about a third of a teaspoon of allspice three-quarters of a teaspoon of ground mustard one heaping teaspoon of salt gave that all a good grind so to a saucepan we're gonna add one quart of our freshly grated tomato then we're gonna add 1/8 of a cup of white vinegar next we add our spice blend we're also gonna add three red peppers and then we're gonna bring this all to a boil and then reduce the heat and just cook it down until it's nice and thick and the consistency of

ketchup

so that is the

Confederate

style

ketchup

next we're gonna make our

union

ketchup

so we're starting from the same place we're going to use some freshly...
grated tomato and in this case we're gonna add 1/4 of that to a saucepan along with a half teaspoon of salt we're gonna bring it up to a boil and reduce the heat and simmer it for one hour so then we're going to pour this into a strainer and use the back of a spoon to press all the juice out we want to leave all the seeds behind if now we add the strained tomato juice back to our saucepan 2 tablespoons of finely grated onion and a big pinch of mace about an eighth of a teaspoon then we're gonna add 8 peppercorns I'm gonna bring this up to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer it until it's nice and thick so here are the final results 2 jars of

ketchup

union

or just

Confederate

and just for kicks we're going to test it against modern Heinz all righty let me go grab my french fries all righty got myself some freshly air fried french fries this is my new favorite of a to make french fries these are just frozen french fries it just works brilliantly you don't have to add any extra oil it Chryst's them up nicely really nicely and it's super fast so if you have an air fryer french fries so so great I'm pretty sure this is not how soldiers in the

Civil

War had their

ketchup

ketchup

was more of ubiquitous sauce that was used to season dishes and meats but since we're going to be comparing it to the modern

ketchup

and this is how we typically have it I'm gonna try it with french fries the

Confederate

ketchup

I can smell the...
pepper in there a little bit of vinegar definitely the spice and this is the

union

this one smells more like tomato soup this one be here this one's a little bit darker red in color and not as chunky and just for kicks we're gonna put the modern version in this bowl right here got our two styles of

ketchup

let's finally give us a taste got myself a french fry deliciously hot I love french fries okay I'm gonna taste this one first and this is the

Confederate

style

ketchup

immediately I noticed the texture is different than the

ketchup

that were used to it's much chunkier although pretty homogeneous and consistent and this is definitely lighter in color than the

Union

style so let's give this one a taste here we go eat the lucky mozz mmm but like that the spice in there is not that strong I thought was gonna be really aggressive it's really nice and complex and actually reminds me a lot of the

ketchup

that we eat today a little bit of that kind of spice flavor but what I really like is the inclusion of the actual fresh peppers a little bit of pepper in there is definitely noticeable it's not just tomato base you've got some vinegar in there too which gives a little bit acidity it's not overly salty by any means that's really delicious mm-hmm let's just trap by itself ooh now I can really taste the pepper then have a little bit more of that peppery heat sensation now let's taste

Union

and I'm gonna try it just plain dry...
itself first here we go whew very different this actually tastes more like tomato sauce you have some acidity which comes from the tomato but we didn't add any vinegar so it's not as punchy the cooked tomato flavor is much more pronounced and concentrated it's more like tomato paste the amount of spice in there is a lot less as well it's in there but not nearly as prevalent as the

Confederate

version mmm-hmm is everything better with fried potatoes I don't know maybe mm-hmm so besides the flavor the consistency of this

ketchup

is a little bit different than the

Confederate

it's a little bit more homogenous and paste like it doesn't separate as readily as a

Confederate

in terms of flavor I actually prefer the

Confederate

and maybe that too due to the fact that this is more similar to my frame of reference of what

ketchup

is in terms of the modern-day

ketchup

and speaking of modern let's compare that with the moderns Heinz 57 varieties version so as we can see it's much darker than either one of these and much smoother in consistency yeah here we go now comparing it to this it doesn't taste like

ketchup

anymore how interesting this is significantly sweeter than either of these other versions yes I just double dipped but this is just for me so it's okay so the modern-day one is significantly sweeter than either of the historical ones it has a much smoother consistency and the flavor of the tomato is very cooked and processed tasting...
that doesn't taste kind of dingy and fresh there is some spice flavor but not nearly as distinctive as the spice flavors in either one of the historical ones yeah it sounds like a modern-day processed food which it is but we love it with our fries and our burgers don't we mm-hmm despite the amount of effort that goes into making these condiments I think it might be a worth the effort because I think they'd be great as an accompaniment to meats or fish I think these would be delicious alrighty so there you have a little historical comparison of

Union

versus

Confederate

ketchup

s of the two

recipe

s as I said I preferred the

Confederate

thanks so much for watching and big thanks to American

battle

field trust for sponsoring this video if you liked today's historical

recipe

be sure to click the link down below and check out the Tres upcoming videos on

Civil

War coffee and rations thanks so much for watching I hope you guys enjoy that one I hope you guys learned something please share this video with your friends check out the

hard

times

playlist this video subscribe and I shall see in the next one Dillons take care bye during I'm starring I'm starring in my proof