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Channel 4 News Death of Willie Rushton, December 11th 1996

Channel 4 News Death of  Willie Rushton, December 11th 1996
and now I look at the weather and tonight most of Britain will have another overcast night with patches of mist or fog there'll be outbreaks of rain in northwestern parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland and the chance of sleet or snow on the hills tomorrow the cloud and rain will spread to the rest of Scotland and Northern Ireland becoming brighter later the dull weather will continue elsewhere and the outlook is for more changeable weather with rain on Saturday followed by sunshine and showers one of Britain's most talented and best loved satirical comedians has died

Willie

Rushton

who was 59 became ill after undergoing heart surgery he appeared on television in the 1960s show that was the week that was and co-founded the magazine Private Eye coming to symbolize the anti-establishment satire of the time later he also became celebrated as a brilliant writer and cartoonist colleagues described him as a very very funny man who'd been universally loved Nicholas glass looks back at his career

Willie

Rustin was many things cartoonist illustrator actor novelist children's author and wit he was famously a fat man who got slim but crucially he was simply funny and likeable the sort of entertaining companion anyone might easily have a drink with he'd been part of the English comic landscape for almost 40 years starting out on it's surreal satirical edge in the early 60s well we Rustin was one of that gang of Shrewsbury schoolboys him Christopher Booker Rashid...
channel 4 news death of willie rushton december 11th 1996
Ingram's and Paul foot who set up Private Eye and made it work from the 60s onwards he of course was an extraordinary cartoonist I mean right from the word go and he was particularly brilliant at political caricature nearly all the figures in public life from the 60s 70s and 80s were done by

Willie

and done I think as well as anyone else has done them as a cartoonist Rustin was an eminent company scoffs Steadman and Trog to name a few but he more than held his own he was a gifted caricaturist you could almost hear his own voice mimicking the characters he drew at the London cartoon gallery where he sold his work he had a room to himself he seems to been able to draw virtually anyone this has always been

Willie

's room since the shop opened in 1994 and he came in for our opening party and settled himself down on a little chair in the middle and fondly recalled it as his his grotto and how will you be remembered at this cartoon gallery hey fondly jovial Santa Claus and of some reading when I was a child he used to read the we need to poo stories and the voice of your is hell around him Rustin was a regular on the 60s satirical show that was the week that was as a writer and performer expresso Bongo opened in Cambridge the proctor mr. Richard Bainbridge whereas to approve all University shows watch the dress rehearsal is that's right there and in one scene for girls posed nude from the waist up mr. Bainbridge said afterwards frankly I prefer cheeks down Oh your wish...
channel 4 news death of willie rushton december 11th 1996
is our command the cast of tw3 once the purposes of a sketch that I had to produce had a race and there were lots of listen lads like Lance Percival now man Cheney and not so listen ones like royal Kunia the surprising winner of the race was Willy rushed in but it is true that he gave up alcohol because he contracted diabetes and he became slimmer then but no more athletic you're going to start Willy and I'd like you to suggest some extracts from a sequel to Moby Dick as written by Raymond Chandler when I came around I was lying face down on the beach Santa Barbara then I heard a voice I'm looking for a private dick she said I looked up she was beautiful a body shimmered like fish skin she had lips like Andrew Lloyd Webber and gills like Prince Charles really Russian always retained an essential Englishness he loved cricket for example and off and on the field he made a lot of Englishmen and others laughs Nicholas glass we were joined here in the studio by the humorist John Wells who's worked with the

Willie

Rushton

throughout his long and varied career I mean he was part of an absolutely brilliant team whatwhat do you think set him apart from the rest well I think he's he's absolutely genuineness

Willie

I mean wherever you saw whenever you are you saw

Willie

he was always grinning and he gave you a great wave and he immediately started being very very funny but he did it absolute everybody and you saw him in the street in Kensington he'd anybody...
channel 4 news death of willie rushton december 11th 1996
came up and asked him the time or said he would he rushed no do you have to rehearse and things he'd never you know waste any time thinking that was what he liked doing he loved just being himself and being tremendously funny and I think he was unlike other people and he was absolutely popular he loved loved the public in a sense he and you for that matter and the rest of you were very very lucky to live between Macmillan and major weren't you well I hadn't thought of that really I mean it was a good time to be doing what he was doing I mean it was we were all launched on this ridiculous chatter boom but

Willie

was absolutely a real he wasn't an actor he wasn't a performer he just was really like that was he politically motivated I mean the satire really had a fantastic aid yes I mean he really what his great their own he was around the Kensington in politics really he would you say let's get this he liked Nick Scott I think that was that was his ideal of what a Tory should be he but he always you saying let's get the Tories back and bash him that was his idea of her because he didn't think Tories were very very funny can you distill which of his great talents in the end was the greatest because he was a really very fine artist wasn't he i didn'ti marvelous cartoonist incredibly good draftsman and he just loved sitting there he's sitting there chewing his lower lip just sketching when these wonderful pointy feet and he was he he was...
a great illustrator but the fact that he came out in everything you know he was constantly bubbling in the ideas you want to do some want to do a thing a version of The Odyssey called the return of major odd he wanted he made up songs about Kensington High Street is my street he did the famous kneez kneez Dhin where the birds sing in the trees didn't nice day oh yes he said it was song when he invented the song but he would just sort of so him the you know it would have come out in any format or what the main thing was that it was absolutely spontaneous and he really he was very very fond about people and I can't anybody of our generation who's gonna be as much missed because it's just although were laughing about it's the most awful shock that's happened to any of because he just seemed the great source of energy and he had a tremendous courage he hadn't didn't have it easy and he was always funny and he always made other people laugh and he kept going to a pub he probably roaring within 5 minutes it must be very difficult I mean Peter Cook Roy canaras was mentioned and now Willy rushed and to be part of that tribe and to see them dropping away yeah cuz we really never appreciated then they've got old I mean we all think we're about 25 still we feel that yes I mean we haven't really grown up but it was no I mean Wes there's still one or two old spectres about like poor old Richard Ingram's I've never seen him but I mean...
there are I mean it's been Peter at losing Peter and losing what is a terrible blow in such a short time simply because he seemed such a great source of energy that you never saw him gloomy he never allowed life to get him done John we're talking about him thank you very very much for coming in